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Author Topic: 1982: A Broken Frame  (Read 51613 times)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #60 on: 26 June 2012 - 02:54:36 »
1982-07-xx - Depeche Mode - Information Sheet 7



http://www.tuug.utu.fi/~jaakko/dm/sheets/is827.txt

      INFORMATION SHEET NO. 7/82

         DEPECHE MODE INFORMATION
      10 HAWKSWAY  BASILDON  ESSEX SS16 5JQ

At your request I have enclosed the DEPECHE MODE information/items. If there is anything else you would like to know about the band please write to me.  For information Sheet No. 8/82 send me a stamped, self addressed envelope towards the end of July quoting the number 8/82.

DEPECHE MODE NEWS: This month we are holding a competition to find a new design for a T-Shirt.  The competition is open to anyone of any age and the only rule is that the drawing is simple and is made up of just three colours. The prize will be an autographed copy of the new DEPECHE MODE LP and two tickets to a DEPECHE MODE concert of your choice in October.  The closing date for entries is August 31st 1982.  If anyone would like to have a go the entry coupon at the bottom of the page MUST be filled in and attached securely to the design.

RECORD NEWS: The new single, as yet un-named, will be released sometime in August.

MERCHANDISE: Although we are still continuing with the Black/Gold Enamel Badges and Poster/Programmes, the February Tour Scarf has now sold out.
We are able to add an 8" x 6" Colour Photograph of Dave, Martin, Andy and Alan to our order form - although these won't normally be autographed, the first 200 we sell will be signed.
Our last few 'Speak & Spell' T-Shirts are now on sale for £2.50.
P1, P2 and P3 Photographs are no longer available.

INTERVIEWS: DEPECHE MODE have only been interviewed by one magazine so far this month, Jackie.

TOUR DATES:      Oct.    6th   Dublin Stadium
             7th   Cork City Hall
             8th   Galway Leisureland
            10th   Southampton Gaumont
            11th   Leicester de Montford Hall
            12th Brighton The Dome
            13th   Southend-on-Sea Cliffs Pavillion
            15th   Bristol Colston Hall
            16th   Birmingham Odeon
            19th   Glasgow Tiffany's
            20th   Edinburgh Playhouse
            21st   Newcastle City Hall
            22ndLiverpool Empire
            24th   London Hammersmith Odeon
            25th   London Hammersmith Odeon
            27th   Manchester Apollo
            28th   Sheffield City Hall
            29th   St. Austell Coliseum

         Tickets for all concerts available from venues.

CUT...........................................................................
      JULY/AUGUST DESIGN-A-T-SHIRT COMPETITION

NAME:               Please complete this coupon and
ADDRESS:            return with your design to:
TOWN:               DEPECHE MODE INFORMATION
COUNTRY:            c/o ANNE
POSTCODE:            10 HAWKSWAY BASILDON
TELEPHONE:            ESSEX SS16 5 JQ
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #61 on: 26 June 2012 - 02:54:52 »
1982-08-19 - Smash Hits (UK) - Bitz

http://likepunkneverhappened.blogspot.com



The waiting is over. Depeche Mode unleash their new single next week. Produced by the band and Mute maestro, Daniel Miller, it's called "Leave in Silence". The team are also putting the final touches to their next LP (as of yet untitled) which should be out at the end of September. They follow this up with a major UK tour in October. All the dates are in Nightsout.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #62 on: 26 June 2012 - 02:55:33 »
1982-08-20 - Radio 1 (UK) - Roundtable (Dave Gahan interview)

Sadly, we don't have this radio interview.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #63 on: 26 June 2012 - 02:56:16 »
1982-08-21 - Record Mirror (UK) - ESSEX APPEAL

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]



ESSEX APPEAL
[Record Mirror, 21st August 1982. Words: Simon Tebbutt. Pictures: Eugene Adebari.]
" ‘You read in all the gossip columns that so and so was seen here, there and everywhere. At the end of the day we feel whacked. We couldn’t go out. Even when we’re not recording, we’re rehearsing.' "
Summary: Brief but fairly analytical look at the progress of the band from "Speak And Spell"'s poppiness to the more thoughtful themes of "A Broken Frame". The band talk about the effects that daily life and touring are having on them in an article that is admirably low on the cute factor. Not an 'all-rounder' but a better article for this year. [1304 words]

    At last, I can exclusively reveal the truth about the famous Blancmange versus Depeche Mode swimming contest.
    Blancmange won the battle but Depeche Mode won the war.
    Mystified readers might recall last week’s Blancmange feature in this very rag where the electronic duo, who’ve been supporting Depeche Mode on tour, claimed to have beaten the Basildon boys fair and square during a swimming race in Jersey. Here’s the Mode side of the tale.
    ‘Nah, they didn’t win,’ they all scoff in unison. ‘Well, they won the swimming…’ ‘That was only because I got cramp,’ protests Andy Fletcher, the tall goodlooking one with the spiky fair hair.
    ‘No, you didn’t,’ corrects singer Dave Gahan, the almost as tall goodlooking one with the dark hair. ‘You just dived in and because everyone was in front of you thought, ah I’ve got cramp.
    ‘But after the swimming,’ he continues, ‘everyone was in the pool with dinghies. It was like an Armada, and we had a battle against Blancmange in which we had to try and turn each other over. We beat them loads of times.’ [1]
    So now we know. But enough of these fripperies. Depeche Mode, now shrunk to a three piece since the departure of Vince Clarke to Yazoo type pastures, have been busy these past few months down in the depths of London Bridge with maestro Daniel Miller recording a new album and single in a studio that’s a converted church.
    ‘It’s a really strange place,’ says Dave. ‘There’s a statue of Christ on the cross that someone’s painted with blood outside in the garden. We had a load of photos down there, but none of those came out. It’s really weird.’
    Curiouser and curiouser. Still that hasn’t stopped the lads taking the train down from Essex every morning and getting down to work. And after a hearty and affable, if somewhat greasy, breakfast in the café across the road, we settle down to the business of discussing exactly what they’ve been up to.
    ‘Well, we’ve done eight tracks now and we’re in the middle of the ninth with one more to go,’ explains Dave, who doubles up with Andy as band spokesman most of the time, while Martin Gore – that’s the slightly smaller one with the fluffy blonde hair who writes the songs – comes in when he feels he’s needed. ‘We’ve done the new single, ‘Leave In Silence’ which we’re very pleased with.’
    ‘It’s getting away from dance music,’ says Martin feeling needed. ‘It’s not that you can’t dance to it – it’s just that the charts are getting too dance orientated. Our publishers advise us to write dance hits. In America they tell us we won’t have a hit if we don’t do a dance number, because the only way they can break a record through there is through the discos.’
    ‘Whereas the stuff on the last album was Euro macho dance music really, beaty synthesizer music, this album’s a lot weightier. It’s got a lot more in it,’ Dave elaborates.
    ‘There are real extremes. We’ve only got working titles at the moment, ‘Meaning Of Love’, ‘Photo You’ and ‘You Shouldn’t Have Done That’ [2], which is like a nursery rhyme, a folky old English song with four harmonies all working together. A bit of a monk’s chant.’
    Nice clean lads, but not in the phoney Osmonds denture cream advertisement way. Depeche Mode don’t seem unduly affected by Vince Clarke’s departure. He penned last year’s smash ‘New Life’ before leaving.
    When Depeche Mode tell you they’re happy for the success of his duo, Yazoo, you believe them.
    ‘We’re really pleased, especially for Alison,’ says Andy. ‘She’s got a great voice. Martin was at school with her and we’ve known her for ages. She’s been working hard for years. A long time before we started.’
    ‘I used to go and see her when she was in a band called the Vicars,’ says Dave. ‘They were a rhythm and blues punky band. And now she’s got the break she needed. We still see Vince quite a lot. He pops in when we’re recording.’
    ‘But we don’t go out with him,’ adds Martin. ‘We don’t get the time. We don’t go out with anybody.’
    ‘We don’t see main groups socially really,’ says Dave, ‘Soft Cell we see occasionally. And ABC. Steve tried to get me to go out with him and Marc one night. He said, Soft Cell and Depeche Mode have got this barrier. Come out with me and Marc. But I was too tired.’
    ‘Sometimes we wonder how bands do it,’ says Andy. ‘You read in all the gossip columns that so and so was seen here, there and everywhere. At the end of the day we feel whacked. We couldn’t go out. Even when we’re not recording, we’re rehearsing. We’ve lost a lot of friends that we used to go out with. You lose touch. [3]
    ‘When we first started, it was our friends who helped a lot. We had a big local following. I think they still like us.’
    ‘You know who your real friends are though,’ adds Dave. ‘They haven’t changed from the beginning. You know when you talk to them and when you’re out with them, they don’t see you as a different person.
    ‘But then you get some of them who weren’t really your proper friends when you began and then they become your real big friends when you’re successful.’
    ‘I think there were about 10,000 people who used to go to school with you,’ Andy tells him.
    ‘Yeah, the class must have about 1,000 people in it according to some people,’ laughs Dave. ‘There were only 40. You think you’re going mad when people say they were at school with you and you can’t remember them.’
    Ah, the price of fame that brings out not only the adulation in some, but the mindless aggression in others. Have Depeche Mode fallen foul to much of this?
    ‘People are quite friendly in Basildon,’ [4] answers Dave, ‘but we’ve had a few hassles on the train,’ says Andy. ‘We had a big bunch of commuters. There was a bit of trouble with some bloke recently. But I don’t think he knew who we were. He just didn’t like the look of us.’
    ‘A lot of people are surprised to meet you on the train,’ says Andy. ‘We had a big bunch of kids jump in our carriage the other day and someone says ooh, it’s Depeche Mode and someone else says no, it isn’t. But they all get in and you have a nice chat.’
    ‘Recently we’ve had a lot of letters,’ says Dave. ‘At one point it seemed to be just girls, but now it’s evened out. Now we seem to be getting a lot of letters from blokes as well.’
    “It’s a healthy sign really,” adds Andy, “because we want to get away from the teenybop image.”
    “We’re growing up and we want our fans to grow up with us,” says Dave.
    Like most of their contemporaries, Depeche Mode started off firmly in the pretty boy pop tradition, but as the others develop a certain musical credibility, they obviously don’t want to become just pretty faces left behind. So if they pushed, where would they bracket themselves?
    “It’s much better that people associate us with the Human League and Soft Cell rather than Duran Duran and Spandau Ballet,” admits Dave. “I hope gradually people will stop associating us with others and we will get our own name and identity.”
    And that’s just what Depeche Mode are getting, if the sounds Daniel Miller has been twiddling around with in the studio while we’ve been talking are anything to go by. A new single and album followed by a nationwide tour in October, I predict a lease of new life for Depeche Mode in 1982.
[1] - This is exactly the kind of barminess that ensues whenever Depeche Mode tour. In 1987/8 they went so far as to take a full set of cricketing equipment on tour with them and proceeded to thrash the support act OMD. And a table football game has been a regular piece of essential equipment at least as far back as the Devotional tour of 1993/4.
[2] - The songs became (for those new to the band) "A Photograph Of You" and "Shouldn't Have Done That". What is confusing though is to see "Meaning Of Love" referred to as a "working title", as it had been released as a single four months previously.
[3] - Reading this here, so early on in their career, is quite sobering, not least because it recalls a scene in the film "101" from 1988. Dave is preparing for a show and reflecting on the fact that he was in many ways happier stacking shelves in a supermarket, because although he might get a lot more money as a pop star he had lost touch with most of his friends. It's easy to scoff when the celebrities say "Money doesn't buy you happiness", but sometimes you have to have the money first to realise how true that is.
[4] - Actually I would like to second that. The number of articles I have on here that poke fun at Basildon are too many to count, yet I doubt that in many of the instances the author has even been there. I spent a long weekend there for a Depeche Mode convention at Easter 2004 and we were all struck by the friendliness of everyone we spoke to. The cabbies were a cut above ("Cam 'ere dahlin', let me give yer an 'and wiv yer... GOR! Bladdy 'ell! Wotcher got in there then eh? Yoo bin stealing the 'otel taahls aincha!"), a restaurant waitress treated us like the only customer she had, the staff of an opticians' were the same with my friend who had an emergency with her contact lenses, and one of the assistants in Marks and Sparks turned the shop upside down for me when I just casually asked if they did cream soda. Right down to the people we found ourselves queueing next to in shops, we were so impressed that we dropped a line to the Basildon Evening Echo thanking everyone for making us so welcome.


Leave in Silence Review (excerpt): http://tiptopwebsite.com/websites/index2.php?username=depechemodefile&page=5

A tower of glory. This pounds with atmosphere, creating a dramatic soundtrack for a film which is created in your minds eye.
Daniela Soave
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #64 on: 26 June 2012 - 02:57:26 »
1982-08-21 - Melody Maker (UK) - Leave in Silence Review

http://tiptopwebsite.com/websites/index2.php?username=depechemodefile&page=5

I've heard more melody coming out of Kenny Wheeler's arsehole.
Paul Weller



1982-08-23 - Depeche Mode - Leave in Silence

http://archives.depechemode.com/video/music_videos/04_leave_in_silence.html
http://www.depechemode.com/video/music_videos/04.html



Leave In Silence
Video Released: 1982
Video Director: Julien Temple
 
Appears on the album:
A Broken Frame
 
Appears on the home video(s):
Promotional only music video - not commercially available
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #65 on: 26 June 2012 - 02:58:49 »
1982-08-28 - ITN (UK) - Saturday Action

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jr9tCXgcRMs



[I made a transcript:]

Host: Yes, indeed, and here in the studio, as I had already said, is Dave Gahan, in the blue jacket, hello Dave, and Andy Fletcher, hi Andy, thanks for popping in. One of the things I've wanted to ask you about the single, it's gone straight in this week, where is it?
Dave: Eh, 52.
Host: 52, so you must be well pleased, is that right?
Dave: Yeah. It's only had a few days, as well.
Host: A few days, I'm sure it's gonna do really well. I've noticed that, I'm sure a lot of people know, are well-aware of the fact that your music has always sort of been really dancable and you got great reviews about it all. This single is a bit of a change of pace, any particular reason for that?
Dave: Well we just sort of thought, like, we had to make a change. We had other stuff that we could have released, but we thought it would a bit more of a challenge to release something like "Leave In silence", which is not so dancable, you can't dance to it, but it's just dreadly heading for the disco, that sort of thing. We'd think it would just be more of a challenge.
Host: And variety? Which is great, yeah. One of the things I do want to mention, a few weeks ago, we had Vince Clarke in here, who had obviously played a big leading role in the band. How did you find all that when Vince left?
Andy: It was hard at first, but we've been writing a few songs and that, we knew he was gonna leave, really, because he was a bit unhappy, didn't talk to us much. But we're friends with him now, that's all that counts.
Host: As you said, he used to do a lot of the writing. Who does the writing now that vince has actually left?
Dave: Martin does all the writing now, he's written all of the new album, which comes out in September.
Andy: We lock him in a room, you see. That's why he isn't here today, you just lock him up till he's got some songs and then you let him out again, giving him food.
Host: One of the things as well, because you're a very young band, all under 21, is that right? Not much longer, alright. I mean, it's great to see such young bands coming through and doing so well at such an early age. Do you think that there's enough done for young bands these days in the business or not? Or do you think it could improve?
Dave: I think it could improve, I think at the moment it tends to be sort of all over the place, at the moment, there's a lot of odd records in the charts and there's a lot of covers, which I think is sort of very unhealthy, really. I think there is a lot of young bands out there, and if they can just come through all that...
Andy: It's quite hard, though, doesn't it, because there's just only a few places to practice. When we first started, we found it very difficult to practice and to play. We took tapes around to every club and every pub, and we got about one support done, stuff like that.
Dave: The only gig we got was the Bridgehouse, with like, Terry there who runs it, with us, faithful all the way.
Host: But then what about bands who do make it such as yourselves? I mean, do you find that it helps you in the future? You actually do benefit from it, do you?
Andy: Yeah, it's when you're young, you tend to be more enthusiastic, you've got more zeal in you.
Host: Now, I understand that you have just completed a new album. Is that right? Have you got a title for it yet?
Dave: Yeah, it's called "A Broken Frame".
Host: "A Broken Frame". And the release date?
Dave: Ehm, I think it's the last week in September.
Host: And what about a tour? I hear there's something in the pipeline, isn't there?
Dave: Yeah, we got a big tour in October, which has been advertised, I think, quite a while now, we accounced it quite a while back now, that's doing very well.
Host: Wherabout is it gonna start? I mean, when do you actually get to London with the tour?
Andy: It's early on, early October. At the Hammersmith Odeon, two nights. We might slip in another date as well.
Host: Oh I see, I see. How did you find the tour in America, when you did the tour in America?
Andy: It was good. Really good.
Dave: It was surprisingly good, actually.
Host: Were there any special bits that you were really knocked out about?
Andy: Yeah, it was good in San Fransisco. It was hot, you see, and in Essex it's not really hot.
Host: Oh well, anyway, listen, thanks for popping in, I'm sure you've got a really busy schedule ahead of you, so good luck with the new tour and album.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #66 on: 26 June 2012 - 03:02:56 »
1982-08-xx - Depeche Mode - Information Sheet 8

http://www.tuug.utu.fi/~jaakko/dm/sheets/is828.txt

               INFORMATION SHEET NO. 8/82

         DEPECHE MODE INFORMATION
      10 HAWKSWAY  BASILDON  ESSEX SS16 5JQ

At your request I have enclosed the DEPECHE MODE information/items. If there is anything else you would like to know about the band please write to me.  For information Sheet No. 9/82 send me a stamped, self addressed envelope towards the end of August quoting the number 9/82.

DEPECHE MODE NEWS: Well we've been home a few weeks from our holidays and the tans are fading rapidly.  Everyone had a smashing time although Andy didn't have too good a start to his week in Corfu; the flight was overbooked so they were delayed, one of his mates lost his luggage and they were all ill!  Never mind, he'll look back and laugh in years to come.

There's not very long before the closing date of our Design-a-T-Shirt Competition so hurry up and send your entries in if you want to win an autographed copy of the new LP and two tickets to see DEPECHE MODE in October.

RECORD NEWS: The new single, (available in both 7" and 12") is called 'Leave in Silence' c/w 'Excerpt from My Secret Garden'.  It will be released on 16th August.

'A Broken Frame' is the title of the LP DEPECHE MODE are currently putting the finishing touches to. 'See You' and 'The MEaning Of Love' are to be included on it as well as 'Leave in Silence' and ' Satellite of Hate'.  The release date for the album isn't yet definite but it will be at the end of September.

MERCHANDISE: Due to extra demand ALL the new 8" x 6" Group Colour Photographs will be autographed.

INTERVIEWS: With the new single being released in August you can be sure DEPECHE MODE will be featured in quite a few magazines although we don't have any that have been finalised.

TELEVISION: DEPECHE MODE will be on the new series of Razzamataz.

TOUR DATES: An extra concert has been added at Birmingham Odeon. Matt Fretton will be the support at all venues.

         Oct.    6th   Dublin Stadium
             7th   Cork City Hall
             8th   Galway Leisureland
            10th   Southampton Gaumont
            11th   Leicester de Montford Hall
            12th Brighton The Dome
            13th   Southend-on-Sea Cliffs Pavillion
            15th   Bristol Colston Hall
            16th   Birmingham Odeon
            17th   Birmingham Odeon
            19th   Glasgow Tiffany's
            20th   Edinburgh Playhouse
            21st   Newcastle City Hall
            22nd Liverpool Empire
            24th   London Hammersmith Odeon
            25th   London Hammersmith Odeon
            27th   Manchester Apollo
            28th   Sheffield City Hall
            29th   St. Austell Coliseum

Week ending 20th August features in 'Record Mirror' and Radio Times.
Listen out for Dave on Roundtable Friday 20th August

CUT...........................................................................
      JULY/AUGUST DESIGN-A-T-SHIRT COMPETITION

CLOSING DATE 31st AUGUST   PLEASE ATTACH THIS COUPON TO YOUR DESIGN
                              ALL ENTRIES MUST BE OF 3 COLOURS ONLY.

NAME:               Please complete this coupon and
ADDRESS:                    return with your design to:
TOWN:               DEPECHE MODE INFORMATION
COUNTRY:            c/o ANNE
POSTCODE:            10 HAWKSWAY BASILDON
TELEPHONE:            ESSEX SS16 5 JQ
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #67 on: 26 June 2012 - 03:03:51 »
1982-09-02 - BBC (UK) - Top Of The Pops

Leave In Silence: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OB5NwYPbFwk

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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #68 on: 26 June 2012 - 03:05:10 »
1982-09-04 - Sounds (UK) - The Bright side of the Moon

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net and http://www.ebay.com/itm/4-9-1982Pg16-17-Article-Pictures-Depeche-Mode-/261744690198.]




THE BRIGHT SIDE OF THE MOON
[Sounds, 4th September 1982. Words: Karen Swayne. Picture: Alison Turner.]
" They honestly are the archetypal boys-next-door, open and straight-forward and often bemused by all the fuss. They tell me that a lot of people expect them to be out clubbing all the time, but that they find it too tiring. "

Summary: Relaxed interview with the band, who sound understandably tired after a round of similar interviews, from the angle of how fame and fortune seems to have suddenly grabbed them after months of playing the Bridgehouse. Generally there's little new stuff here, going over the familiar ground of how they got their lucky break. That said, it's a serviceable article and a very pleasant read. [2452 words]
Apologies for the poor picture quality: this is because the scans were taken from a public library microfilm.

    “There was a time when we were really desperate, nobody was interested in us except for this Rastafarian who wanted to turn us into an electronic reggae group. Seriously! It was really weird – he had this plan to take us to Nigeria… the only thing was he wanted us to wear Dr Who gear, dress like Daleks or Cybermen – reckoned they’d love it in Africa!”
    We all snigger at the thought of Depeche Mode going wild in the jungle. With other bands the idea might not be quite so ludicrous, but the Mode sound is so essentially urban, the clean bright pop consciousness of the new town, Basildon to be precise.
    Seated around the modest semi where Dave still lives with his parents, the Depeche boys are happily reminiscing about times gone by while dispensing tea and charm to the visiting hacks. This is about their ninth (and last) interview of the day, more strangers who want to know what they’re all about (maaan), so I suppose you can’t blame them for occasionally wandering off the point.
    “All the good times came from the early days you know, when things weren’t so organised,” says redhead Andrew Fletcher rather despondently. “That’s when you meet all the people and have a laugh. These days when we go on tour we just get shunted from place to place, there’s no good times any more.”
    Ah, such worldliness in one so young – it’s hard to believe that Depeche Mode have been around for about two years, regularly playing to about 20 people at the last bastion of futurism, the Bridge House, for the first 12 months of their career.
    “I think that really helped us, it gave us a lot of experience in playing live,” adds fresh-faced singer Dave. “A lot of bands today are successful right away and go straight into playing somewhere like Hammersmith Odeon. I remember those early gigs so vividly, now I can’t remember what half the places we played on the last tour even looked like.”
    It was Daniel Miller of Mute who gave them the chance to take their snappy synth style out of the pub circuit, but for a while it had seemed that nobody wanted to know.
    Andrew: “When we first took our tape round we didn’t get anything from any of the record companies. Stiff sent us this real sarcastic letter – something like ‘Hi, budding superstars…’”
    Dave: “Yeah, me and Vince went everywhere, visited about 12 companies in one day. Rough Trade were our last hope, we thought at least we’ve got them, surely they’ll like it, after all they’ve got some pretty bad bands, but even they turned us down! They were all tapping their feet and that and we thought – this is the one! – then they went, hey, that’s pretty good, it’s just not Rough Trade.
    “Then they said, how about this man, pointing at Daniel who’d just walked into the room. He took one look at us, went ‘Yeech!’, walked out and slammed the door!”
    Not the best of starts, but it turned out he was in a bad mood at the time, and a subsequent meeting led them to signing to him. By then the tables had been turned, this time it was the majors who were chasing the band.
    “They’d come to the gigs, buy us meals and generally fatten us up. They offered us loads of money, it was quite tempting really, but we trusted Daniel, didn’t want to let him down.”
    Do you ever regret going with an independent label though?
    Andrew: “I think we lose out a bit because there’s things we can’t do as we haven’t got hundreds of thousands of pounds behind us. We’ve got a partnership deal, so anything we do we pay for ourselves.”
    Dave: “I don’t regret going with Mute though, because I think we’ve got a much better deal than most bands, we’re far more in control of things. We manage ourselves too, so we have to budget carefully all of the time, but we can release anything we like. I think a lot of companies would’ve been a bit dubious about releasing the new single – we’ve got other songs which are more obvious hits, but whether they would have been the right thing to bring out is another matter.”
    ‘Leave In Silence’, the current single, does mark a change in style for Dep Mode. It shows the way their sound is maturing, the rather harsh, brittle edge of their early 45s is gradually being smoothed out and there’s more obvious emotion and feeling evident. It’s an important time for the band – they’ve just completed their second album, ‘The Broken Frame’ [sic], and they’re determined to prove that they can do just as well without Vince Clarke, if not better.
    As he was the writer responsible for all their early hits, there must have been a problem when he left?
    Dave: “Not really, because we were so rushed we had to cope.
    “I think Vince was maybe a bit surprised at how we reacted, but we were fairly prepared – the general atmosphere had been getting really bad, it was like us three and Vince on his own. He just felt that we were becoming public property, he didn’t like what was happening to Depeche Mode, didn’t like being famous, didn’t like touring.
    “Now he’s had a couple of hit singles with Yazoo, they’ve got an album out and they go on tour in September – it’s a bit hypocritical really.”
    On the new LP Martin Gore wrote all the songs. He’s been the quietest, gazing out from under his blond curls and looking like he’d rather be somewhere else. I try the direct approach. Did you find it easy to suddenly have to write an LP’s worth of tracks?
    “No, but it was a question of trying to write them in the little time that we had. I was trying to fit in doing them between all the other things, and in the end half of them were written in the studio.”
    Isn’t that a bad thing, having to write to order?
    “Well, I’d obviously rather not do it but I think they’ve turned out alright.”
    Were you writing before?
    “Yeah, I wrote ‘See You’ when I was 17.”
    “And that was our biggest selling single,” adds Dave conclusively. “I think this album’s a lot better than ‘Speak And Spell’, it’s more varied anyway.”
    Andrew: “It’s a lot weightier, not so lightweight and poppy. A lot of people who liked us before might not like it because it isn’t bouncy – a lot of the songs are very moody.”
    “You’ve gotta change though,” Dave states, “you can’t carry on the same level all the time, you just progress as you go along. Before it was more aimed at electropop disco, but everything is dance-orientated these days.”
    That the Depeche sound is maturing is good to hear. I’ll admit to being one of the early sceptics, I found their songs to simple, too repetitive, but even then there was something infuriatingly catchy and appealing, a directness that was hard to dislike and even harder to ignore.
    They’ll admit to being lucky – they’ve had time to grow away from the pressures of major label concerns – and surprisingly (to me anyway) bemoan the state of the current charts.
    “They’re in such a mess at the moment, full of cover versions, which I don’t think is very healthy. Anyone can make an old hit record a hit again, especially in the summer. You get people like Soft Cell doing a cover, but the kids who buy it don’t realise it is because they’ve never heard it before, so although they might not mean to, they’re taking credit for something they didn’t originally make.”
    Dave’s right, it is the easy option and it’s sad to see so many bands taking such a safe way out.
    “Thing is, over here you have to worry about every record, one minute you’re on top of the world, next minute you’re a flop and nobody wants to know you. It’s really hard to establish yourself.”
    Andrew: “Reckon it takes about five albums.”
    “And a few more ulcers,” mutters Martin.
    Still, I don’t think they’ve got too much to worry about, from where I stand they’re in a better position than most.
    Dave: “I think it’s good that we haven’t really got an image. Some bands seem to get stuck in one, but although everyone’s always trying to put us in a pigeon hole we’ve just dressed the way we wanted to at the time.”
    Andrew: “The band with the best image of all is Pink Floyd, they’re a really faceless group. I mean I don’t really like their music, but although they’re one of the world’s biggest bands if you saw Brian Waters…”
    “Roger Waters you idiot,” bursts in Dave.
    “Oh yeah, well that’s what I mean, they’re really anonymous.
    “We don’t have any pictures of us on our record covers, because they date so quickly. Like the Duran Duran cover, they were all dressed up, had all the gear on.”
    Andrew: “Bet they’re really embarrassed about that now!”
    Martin: “They should’ve been at the time!”
    Dave: “And that’s there for life – it’s much better to have some kind of design. The new LP sleeve is really good, much better than the last one, that was awful! The guy who did it, Brian Griffin (he also does the Echo and the Bunnymen sleeves), when he was explaining it he was going – I imagine a swan floating in the air – and we’re going, yeah, right, then he’s talking about it floating on this sea of glass and it sounded really great. It turned out to be a stuffed swan in a plastic bag! It was meant to be all nice and romantic, but it was just comical!”
    This is said with so much innocent despair that any doubts I had about Depeche being techno-poseurs are banished forever. They honestly are the archetypal boys-next-door, open and straight-forward and often bemused by all the fuss. They tell me that a lot of people expect them to be out clubbing all the time, but that they find it too tiring.
    “I dunno how people do it and work at the same time,” says Andrew. “I’d rather go home and watch a video or something.”
    Dave: “There was this time when I did a personal appearance at the Camden Palace and I was practically pulled apart. It was really scary, when I got inside I was trapped and there were people clawing at me, ripping my clothes, pulling my hair – I was so frightened I ran and hid myself in the loo, I just didn’t want to come out. I think that was one of my worst experiences, those kids could kill you.”
    It seems odd that such a normal bloke (and that’s a compliment) could arouse that kind of hysteria – such is showbiz, I suppose. He’s a fairly reluctant teen hero, buying girls Mars bars when he goes to the shops!
    Andrew: “Sometimes when it gets really bad you stop and think what am I doing here? All I wanted to do was be in a band, I was quite happy playing the Bridge House!”
    Dave: “Yeah, you sell about ten records and you’re really happy, next thing you know you’re playing Hammersmith Odeon and selling thousands – it doesn’t mean as much as you think it will.”
    Andrew: “Up until the band formed, I’d never flown before. When I was younger it was always a dream of mine, but in the last six months I’ve flown so much I don’t even think about it now. Like we used to get really excited about taking off, fight for the window seat, now half the time you don’t even notice when you do take off – it’s bad when it starts getting like that.”
    Did you enjoy your last tour?
    “When you look back you think you did, but I remember in the middle of the tour going, ‘Oh no, I can’t go on!’”
    Dave: “Yeah, it does get a bit much, you all get on top of each other crowded in a little van – we’re doing another one in October though!”
    Andrew: “I think we just do it out of habit! Also we developed quite a good live following so we don’t want to let them down.”
    “We don’t really do it for enjoyment ‘cos we don’t like playing live, I always feel such a berk. Like I hate seeing myself on telly ‘cos it’s never how you imagine yourself to be.”
    Dave: “That’s the good thing about doing videos – you get a chance to do other things. In our new one we’re all painted different colours, I’m blue, Martin’s red, Andy’s yellow and Al’s green.”
    (The latter is Alan Wilder who’ll be working with them live.)
    “We’re not really known as a video band, which could be something to do with the first one we made – it wasn’t that bad, just general cheapo! I enjoyed doing this one though, it was good being painted ‘cos it’s like you’re hidden behind a mask and you can do anything you want.”
    This leads into a discussion of the Duran videos which reportedly cost around £80,000 – one example of the advantages of being on a major, although I can think of better ways to spend that kind of money.
    Then Dave chips in gleefully: “We still get letters from our American fans and they wrote to us that they’d seen Duran stamping on a poster of Spandau Ballet in the street! Apparently they were going – they’re nothing but a bunch of poseurs!”
    Megalomania has apparently hit the boys from Brum in a big way, but there’s no chance of the Basildon wonders falling into the same trap – they don’t see themselves as stars.
    Andrew: “People expect us to live in some kind of penthouse flat, but living at home suits my needs. I can’t really afford to buy somewhere anyway, I used to think, one hit single and you get your Rolls-Royce but I think it takes about ten albums to be comfortably off, so you don’t have to work.”
    Depeche Mode’s utter lack of pretension is what gives them their undoubted appeal. They treat the whole thing as a natural process, and have no time for the theorising which restricts so many others – they get on and do it rather than agonise about their place in the scheme of things.
    They’ll never be overwhelmed by it all, in fact they remain remarkably unaffected by their star status. These local boys have made good, and promise to make even better in the future.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #69 on: 26 June 2012 - 03:05:40 »
1982-09-16 - Noise (UK) - Modey Old Dough

[Thanks to ScannedPress of Scannedpress.blogspot.com for scanning this!]



http://www.tuug.utu.fi/~jaakko/dm/modey.txt

MODEY OLD DOUGH..
BILL PRINCE heads East to take tea with the Basildon Boys and unCOVER (geddit?) what the lads have been up to of late...

WHEN YOU think that Depeche Mode, perhaps more than any other New Pop band, have come to represent the breath of fresh air that has done so much to revive a fast-suffocating chart scene it comes as bit of a surprise to learn that David Gahan considers the good ol' Top Forty to be in a bit of a mess at the moment. It's all the covers knocking about' explains Dave, competing with Tarzan on the telly in his Basildon home, 'bands seem to be taking the easy way out by releasing old songs that are bound to be a hit without much thinking having to be done'.  Not that the Modes are above playing a few golden oldies themselves, although only those lucky enough to catch the lads live will have heard them. Dave: 'We do some for a laugh On the old tour we did Gerry And The Pacemakers' "I Like It". Andy who has just come in with Martin reminds his mate of a few more including Abba's "Mama Mia" and the charmingly tacky "Mouldy Old Dough' by the long since forgotten Lieutenant Pigeon. So no plans to get them down on vinyl then? Martin too quiet and sincere-looking for his jokes to be instantly recognisable muses: 'After the next album it would be nice to do an album of covers and call it 'Music For Parties Vol. 2'.  Andy on a more serious note explains: 'One of the ideas we had for Christmas was to release an EP with some of the covers we have done on it, things like 'G.I.Blues' and 'I Like It' but we can't do it now 'cos we haven t got any time, we're too busy.

And busy they have been with their follow up album to 'Speak And Spell' just completed, a new single to promote and a big tour looming in October where the new material, largely penned by Martin might come as a shock to those who have dismissed Depeche Mode as a purely pop band.  Dave: 'The new single is a lot different to the others we have done and the new album has the same sort of weight really. Rather than doing more of the light weight pop we decided to experiment in the studio'.  Not that the Modes can't knock out a winning melody or two though, 'Martin can write poppy things as well, there's a couple of poppy tracks on the album like 'The Meaning Of Love' and there's one called 'Photograph Of You' but we also wanted to do something really different to see if we could do it and I think it has turned out well.' But why release a track like 'Leave In Silence' which isn't as accessible as the earlier hits?  Dave is certain that what the band needs now is a challenge: 'We did have other things that we could have released which we think would have got in the charts and would have probably been successful but it didn't seem right.  You can't carry on releasing stuff every few months and have a hit with something catchy. We thought this was more of a risk to release because it is not so instant. You've got to hear it at least five times before you can really begin to listen to it'.  Throughout the discussion of new material principal writer Martin stays largely silent but does say of his songwriting: 'I write about anything really, whatever it is I just exaggerate it'.

The other two are confident that any songwriting talents the band had did not depart with Vince Clark who penned their early hits before leaving to join Alf in Yazoo.  Dave: 'We wanted to get into Martin's songs because he had a couple of songs on 'Speak And Spell' and just from the reactions of fans writing in it was clear that they were a lot of people's favourite tracks.  When Vince was with us we were happy to let him write because I think a lot of songwriters in a band can be a bad thing. If a band has, say, three songwriters all wanting to do singles and things it can get too much. Things were happening so fast around the time of 'I Just Can't Get Enough', Vince was writing hit records and we were happy, we didn't question it.  There was no time to think about exploring more so when Vince left it did us a lot of good because it gave us a kick up the arse, we went out and made 'See You' and it was our biggest selling record'.

It's good to hear of success going hand in hand and it certainly appears that Depeche Mode have a bit of the Midas Touch.  When Daniel Miller signed the band to his fledgling Mute Records he could offer boys little in the way of cash up-front (how all the major record labels operate) but then this isn't how the Modes like to work as Andy who seems to take the most interest in the business Side of the band explains: we did toy with the idea of signing to a major but we thought it would be more of a challenge to go with Daniel'.  The decision has certainly paid dividends for all concerned with Andy noting with pride that not only did Mute have 2.7% of UK singles sales for the last six months ('even CBS had only 5.3%!') but the band themselves are on the same percentage as Paul McCartney after only a fraction of the time in the Biz. Just a pity you're not on the same money eh lads?

Even their favoured recording studio, Blackwing, has grown with the success of the band.  Boasting a measly eight tracks when they made their first recording in the converted church, it now has a full sixteen tracks made possible by the work Depeche Mode's recordings have put its way. It's the band's keen sense of economics that led them into becoming an all synthesiser group after briefly experimenting with the traditional guitar, bass and drums line-up. Andy: 'When we started we didn't have good guitars or good amps so it seemed a much better idea to spend just  200 on a synth on H.P.  It was also much more convenient practice-wise'. The shift was certainly total but the band haven't abandoned acoustic sounds altogether as Andy explains: 'There's a lot of percussion on the new album, you know just hitting things plus there's walking and marching and that sort of thing, but nothing you could really call an instrument'.  'There is a saxaphone, corrects Dave, 'But you wouldn't be able to make it out. It's recorded backwards and it sounds like an elephantl!'

Thanks to people like Thomas Dolby, the image of yer average synth player is half musician, half scientific boffin so how do the three lads fit into this?  Andy: 'We're not really technicians. We couldn't mend anything, if it didn't work after giving it a kick we would have to throw it away! ' So do the lads have anything in common with their synth-totin' predecessors? Kraftwerk are considered an influence but as for other German bands like Can...  'We'd never heard of 'em' exclaims Andy who adds, 'They're so much older than us, we're just young saplings!'

Young saplings maybe, but the Modes have made quite a name for themselves in other countries although you're not likely to know about it in the UK. Andy again: 'This is where we really miss out being on a small label, we just don't get the same publicity or promotion. We played the Ritz recently in New York. 300 people were turned away. We had a good reception everywhere we played but none of it got back to Britain.  Haircut 100 go over there and all you hear is how the Haircuts are massive because they played the Ritz and sold it out'. Martin makes a rare interruption to mention that Duran Duran sold out the Peppermint Lounge: 'It only holds about 400 people and back here it's 'Duran Duran have sell out tour'. But Depeche Mode are too nice to get bitchy - they accept that they don't get the same amount of publicity and content themselves with the belief that some bands get too much.  Anyway, they don't really want it : 'I think Depeche Mode still get a lot of respect' explains Andy, 'we still get in the indie charts and that sort of thing'. Success in the Independent charts is no mean feat for a band as commercially successful as the Modes but this they put down to their own musical progression. Dave: 'We're growing up and I think our audience is growing up with us.  I'm sure many of the people who will come and see us now are the ones who came to our gigs two years ago, they want us to change so that's what we're doing'.

 So what of the tour?  Well it kicks off on the first of October in Ireland and takes the band to England, Germany and Japan. Do the band like touring? Dave: 'It's OK but I don't like Europe much especially France. They're so unfriendly there, I'm sure it's something to do with our name (in case you don't know, Depeche Mode is a french magazine). Mind you' adds Dave thoughtfully. 'I wouldn't like to be in a band called Woman's Own over here that much!'  Quite, well who would?
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #70 on: 26 June 2012 - 03:06:33 »
1982-09-21 - BBC (UK) - Razzmatazz

Leave In Silence: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aICkXOYE9z0





1982-09-25 - Melody Maker (UK) - Review

http://depechemodefile.wordpress.com/2010/12/31/fast-fashion-in-basildon-melody-maker/
zinio.com/www/browse/issue.jsp?skuId=90122644



http://tiptopwebsite.com/websites/index2.php?username=depechemodefile&page=6

"What a difference a year makes. The Depeche Mode of '81's 'Speak And Spell' seduced their way into our hearts and into the charts with unblemished innocence; the synthesized soul brothers of cartoon punks, the Ramones.
The role and execution were essentialy simple: perfect pop with no pretentions. Such (ac)cute timing could scarcely be dismissed as contrived, such sublime straightforwardness blossomed beyond all critical sniping.
But, though in many ways ambitious and bold, 'A Broken Frame' - as its name suggests - marks the end of a beautiful dream. Now Vince Clarke's (selfishly?) split the market, 'A Broken Frame' sounds sadly naked, rudely deprived of the formula's novelty.
Whereas past pilferings were overlooked as springboards towards an emerging identity, the larcenies of 'A Broken Frame' sound like puerile infatuations papering over anonymity. What it also illustrates is that growing up in public is much the same as it was in the '60s - that once established as a commercial viability, pressure, pride or self-opinionation invariably pushes a band beyond compounding their capabilities and fuels daft aspirations to art.
To be fair, the one factor in favour of Depeche Mode's commercial decline, the sole grace that saves 'A Broken Frame' from embarrassment, is that their increasing complexity sounds less the result of exterior persuasion than an understandable, natural development.
It may lack Vince's gossamer sleight of hand, the ponderous 'Monument' may sound positively ugly compared to the wry 'Boys Say Go' but 'A Broken Frame' is closer to 'Speak And Spell' than its tricky veneer might suggest.
The lyrics have matured from wide-eyed fun to wild-eyed frustration, but the weary words of 'Leave In Silence', just like the glib ones of 'Just Can't Get Enough', are words and nothing more. In attempting the balance Yazoo get away with, the new Depeche Mode overstep the mark. Vince is adept at conjuring musical moods and Alf's voice is earthy and human enough to con us there's emotion behind their candyfloss, but the Mode remain essentially vacuous.
'Shouldn't Have Done That', the album's most ambitious departure, proves beyond doubt that Depeche attempting to twist pin-up appeal into nursery neurosis is like asking the Banshees to play 'Little Deuce Coupe'. The boys' pluck should be applauded and we should be grateful that they refuse to tread water.
But the plain fact is, they're drowning."
Steve Sutherland
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #71 on: 26 June 2012 - 03:07:17 »
1982-09-25 - NME (UK) - A Broken Frame Album review

[Thanks to Marblehead Johnson for scanning this for this forum. Transcribed using OCR.]



DEPECHE MODE
A Broken Frame (Mute)
Pic: Peter Anderson
Paul Morley

JIM KERR of major group Simple Minds marvels that he has sung on five LPs, and now Depeche Mode — laughing till the end of time but not sure if they can smile anymore — dart in to drop their second LP at our feet: it's not so much a career, they're just absorbed, mingling thoughts of love and honesty, virtuously oblivious of the strange 'obligations of the street' that some ranty commentators feel is mandatory for all beating, feeling, wakeful pop groups.
Depeche Mode, they bounce, they brood, and things open up.
I have, enough times for even the dullest fixed ranter to appreciate, explained why the peachy modests are, if not pathological grotesque smashing into bourgoise sobriety, then something far more ironic and subtle than the 'banal inno-paps'. Those who can only take the hard rusting edges that lie here and there as a reality will continue to liken Depeche Mode to a handful of sand wrapped in a handkerchief (eh? - Ed.): But then, there's no need to shriek until the cows speak the language of God. (Eh? again -Ed.) Depeche Mode may not drive me crazy but I feel no jealousy or resentment towards their brand of abundant vitality, nor feel a need to snigger at their simple cares and sorrows. If they tickle rather than heckle I see nothing obscene in that: and of course the authentic heckler is a rare thing within rock-pop-or algebra.
It's too easy to carry through the sheer fallacies that from rock-pop-or cookery can surge spectacular interpretations of life, brilliant significations of emancipation, startling cries for unity. At best there are noble, enchanting individual efforts that can attach themselves to other efforts to form instructive patterns. Pop, after all that, seems to be a matter for the individual: is your own house in order? In terms of 'is your own house in order?' Depeche Mode are as smashing as Throbbing Gristle. The tickles are not wasted, whereas the heckles usually are.
Depeche Mode: nothing necessarily follows, and anything possibly may.
So who can really say that Mode's splendid, singing combinations of sound and incidental lacks grief or soul or mystique once it's accepted, and it must be, that Depeche Mode enter into the spirit of pop writing with honesty and a slight nervousness? One streaming Mode instrumental passage could well contain more heart and petulance than an entire Jam LP: it's difficult to say, taking it beyond dogma.
For me — and right now I have control — the Mode talk about the passing pleasures with an ace precision, and are a consistently excellent illumination of pop's mystical ability to ravish the senses through a combination of sweet regrets and agile delight. However slight or too-sweet it may appear to the casual listener there is — in truth—far too much detail, succulence and rude sense for the music to be dismissed with dull complaint. Tender, deceptive, and with perhaps sharper joys than steel and ice... again, who's to say?
Depeche Mode: avid for delight, serious about dream and love, and such a moving sound from such a carefree touch.
On 'A Broken Frame' the subjects are Mode favourites: tears running down the cheek, the dangerous fragility of childhood, songs springing from the casual overhearing of a chance remark. This is what they do and it's foolish to spite it: they have acquired a conviction that they aren't really willing to give up for yours. What can be immediately appreciated is their quickening concision, their increasing artfulness, Martin Gore's impressive songs, songs that connect firmly with the folk-wisdom and folk-metaphysics of the vanished Vince.
If Depeche Mode could have become the trapped inno-paps cynics stubbornly assumed them to be once Vince blew the Yazoo, all motion and no progression, 'A Broken Frame', brief, cunning, certain, is as much as anything an assertion that the Mode is no headless chick.They could have got silly, withdrawn into ditties or got all weepy, sweeping brushes along epic linoleum. But they have kept their head, developing the games that were boxed on their last LP 'Speak And Spell'. The wandering of Vince has not harmed the Depeche balance: armed with innocence, apt to blush, yet open to life's sins and challenges.
The opening two songs tell the tale. Encircling the trembling shadows with 'Satellite' and then bursting bluntly into the yellowing dilemma of the meaning of love, as if aware for the first time of potential. Depeche Mode don't consider for an instance set attitudes; what it is assumed a group like them should or should not do. With such an uninhibited spirit their variation on blues, or folk, ("Shouldn't Have Done That") is as fresh as The Undertones. For those who insist that Depeche Mode are timid, or whatever it is, the songs 'Leave In Silence' and 'Shouldn't Have Done That' show a group consumed with curiosity, yearning for more than the shallows. And with Depeche Mode it is their potential that excites as much as anything. When they find more places and hear more...
Depeche Mode shed their light under some dark cloud, with that determination to move forward. There is something sombre, an accident or five, some amorous melodies, there's furtive tears and turbulent nonsense; smiling and youthful and blueish voices; here they romp, here they float, and there — sore grievances and the foaming joy. I'm all for it.



1982-09-25 - Record Mirror (UK) - Album Review

[Photo taken from the now-defunct site david-gahan.net. I typed out the text.]



Frozen frame
Depeche Mode: 'A Broken Frame' (Mute STUMM 009)

This is the test - is there life after Vince Clark? Well for now I'll dodge a straight answer, but on the evidence of 'A Broken Frame', Depeche Mode face in uphill battle of they are to maintain the instant charm on their earlier work. Simply, Depeche are becoming predictable, safe and a stifle trying.
Depeche do make attempts to broaden their music, but too often their pleasant synthi patchwork can do nothing but INDICATE a mood, rather than REALISE it.
Perhaps they should stop being so consistently 'nice'. Depeche are never less than pleasant, well scrubbed suburban boys. They preserve soul and emotion in aspic. Noting on this album touches on raw feeling: Depeche make you smile, they'll never make you laugh or cry.
Having stated my case it'd be churlish to deny Mode's radio appeal; the last three singles are all included here and I'm a sucker for all of 'em. Perhaps we should expect no more from the Basildon boys, yet whilst Alf 'n' Vince are brewing up such a powerful soulful sound this LP can be nothing more than a pleasant distraction.
Two people at RM absolutely drool over Dep Mode, one of them is male one of them is female, but neither of them is me. +++
Jim Reid.



1982-09-25 - Sounds (UK) - Album Review

[Thanks to Barclay for scanning this for this forum! Transcribed using OCR.]



DEPECHE MODE
'A Broken Dream' (MUTE STUMM 9)
**1/2
DO YOU ever get the feeling that some urchin has popped all the party balloons at the synthesised picnic? It has all been getting just a little drab lately, even though these keyboard stars had been promising you (and themselves) fun, frolics and fulfillment with a little help from their electronic friends. 'A Broken Dream'? Well, if you still believe that through the sole use of 'synthesised sound' there is some salvation from the tired tradition of smutty rock and roll (which may be 'smutty' but it was never programmed) then my little spring chicklets, you most certainly are dreaming. Although there is not that much left that one can do with the good ol' gtr/drm/voc plaything, at least in terms of a brand new format, if 'A Broken Dream' is a fair sampler-of what else is on offer, then the market place (a plug for all you nouveau businessmen) is becoming a bare and empty space. The main problem for Depeche Mode is that the use of synthesised sound, to the exclusion of almost everything else, within a pop song is rather limited. The reason that Yazoo — to pick a slightly obvious comparison — manage to make their songs succeed on more than the perfunctory 'nice tune' level, is the way the hard synthesised beat is juggled against Alison's vibrant vocal style. David Gahan's voice serves the instrument —barely intruding, always obeying, never giving any orders — instead of playing off against the flat sheen of the Moog. Listening to Gahan on 'A Broken Dream', you know that he is not a boy who is likely to make a fuss, shout at people or make any kind of nuisance of himself. He/they will merely sing you a lullaby, and there'll be sweet dreams all round. The songs of Depeche Mode are not bad — there are many that I wouldn't even let near my record collection — and they are, pathetically at times, nice. But, is that all there is? If you want Beatles melodies chucked through a home computer, then I'm sure that a fourteen old schoolboy with a Casio 'mini synth' could satiate you. It is possible to accept this calculated kind of blandness when it is just a three minute stab at the charts, because then you know that it isn't going to last that long. But the very attempt to put together a whole LP's worth of these songs shows their shortcomings to what is becoming an (hopefully) increasingly critical world. Ah well, it's only rock and roll (ha! ha!). Goodnight, sleep tight, make sure the bugs don't bite.
CHRIS BURKHAM



1982-09-25 - Melody Maker (UK) - The Long And Windling Mode

[Thanks to Barclay for scanning this for this forum! Transcribed using OCR.]



The long and winding Mode

Depeche Mode
A BROKEN FRAME
Mute Stumm 9
WHAT a difference a year makes. The Depeche Mode of '81's "Speak And Spell" seduced their way into our hearts and into the charts with unblemished innocence; the synthesized soul brothers of cartoon punks, the Ramones.
The role and execution were essentially simple: perfect pop with no pretensions. Such (ac)cute timing could scarcely be dismissed as contrived, such sublime straightforwardness blossomed beyond all critical sniping.
But, though in many ways ambitious and bold, "A Broken Frame" - as its name suggests — marks the end of a beautiful dream. Now we've all caught up on the numerous influences — Krautrock, Bolan, the Monkees, etc — now Vince Clark's (selfishly?) split the market, "A Broken Frame" sounds sadly naked, rudely deprived of the formula's novelty.
Whereas past pilferings were overlooked as springboards towards an emerging identity, the larcenies of "A Broken Frame" sound like puerile infatuations papering over anonymity.
What it tells us, more than anything else, is that the Mode have lately been feasting on a meagre diet of Simon And Garfunkel, post "Hard Day's Night" Beatles, Kraftwerk (of course!) and "Pet Sounds" era Beach Boys. What it also illustrates is that growing up in public is much the same as it was in the Sixties — that once established as a commercial viability, pressure, pride of self-opinionation invariably pushes band beyond compounding their capabilities and fuels daft aspirations to ART.
To be perfectly fair, the one factor in favour of Depeche Mode's inevitable commercial decline, the sole grace that saves "A Broken Frame" from embarrassment, is that their increasing complexity sounds less the result of exterior persuasion than an understandable, natural development.
It may lack Vince's gossamer sleight of hand, the ponderous "Monument" may sound positively ugly compared to the wry "Boys Say Go", but "A Broken Frame" is closer to "Speak And Spell" than its tricky veneer might suggest. This is not altogether a good thing!
The lyrics have matured from wide-eyed fun to wild-eyed frustration, but the weary word: of "Leave In Silence", just like the glib ones of "Just Can't Get Enough", are words and nothing more. No passion or purpose prompts these compositions, there's no emotional breakthrough —they're merely a collection of pop hieroglyphics and "A Broken Frame" is every inch as empty as "Speak And Spell". In just more miserable, that's all.
In attempting the balance that Yazoo get away with, the new Depeche Mode overstep the mark. Vince is adept at conjuring musical moods and Aff's voice is earthy and human enough to con us there's emotion behind their candyfloss, but the Mode remain essentially vacuous.
"Shouldn't Have Done That", the album's most ambitious departure, proves beyond doubt that Depeche attempting to twist pin-up appeal into nursery neurosis is like asking the Banshees to play "Little Deuce Coup". The boys' pluck should be applauded and we should be grateful that they refuse to tread water. But the plain fact is, they're drowning.
STEVE SUTHERLAND
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #72 on: 26 June 2012 - 03:07:47 »
1982-09-30 - Smash Hits (UK) - Album Review & Top 10

[I typed out the text:]

http://likepunkneverhappened.blogspot.com



MY TOP TEN
Alan Wilder of Depeche Mode
1. DAVID BOWIE: Ashes To Ashes (RCA) Very atmospheric.
2. SMOKEY ROBINSON: Tears Of A Clown (Motown) One of the records I couldn't get out my brain when it first came out. Still sounds great today.
3. THE SEX PISTOLS: Anarchy In The UK (EMI) The ultimate in raw energy.
4. THE BEATLES: Day Tripper (Parlophone) It's difficult to pick a Beatles song.
5. PETER GABRIEL: Games Without Frontiers (Charisma) You can always rely on him to come up with interesting songs and lyrics.
6. DIANA ROSS & THE SUPREMES: Reflections (Motown) Must be due for a cover.
7. ROXY MUSIC: Virginia Plain (EG) Far superior to Roxy's most recent offerings.
8. XTC: Statue Of Liberty (Virgin) Was this a single? Should have been. (It was - Ed.)
9. ELVIS COSTELLO: Watching The Detectives (Stiff) A very talented songwriter.
10. MOTT THE HOOPLE: All The Way From Memphis (CBS) It was a toss-up between this and "Honaloochie Boogie".




DEPECHE MODE: A Broken Frame (Mute)
When Vince left Depeche Mode to invent Yazoo he took with him a good portion of their cutting edge, leaving them with a style of electronic delicacy bordering on the fey. While this showed up as a lack of purpose in their early Vince-less singles, "A Broken Frame" makes a virtue of their timkly-bonk whimsy. Like their last single, "Leave In Silence", it's almost pastoral and so set you could wash the dishes in it. And I think it's wonderful.
(8 out of 10)
Peter Silverton
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #73 on: 26 June 2012 - 03:08:08 »
1982-09-xx - Sounds (UK) - Album Review

http://tiptopwebsite.com/websites/index2.php?username=depechemodefile&page=6

It is possible to accept this calculated kind of blandness when it is just a three minute stab at the charts?
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1982: A Broken Frame
« Reply #74 on: 26 June 2012 - 03:08:49 »
1982-09-xx - Masterbag (UK) - THE MEANING OF MUTE

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]





THE MEANING OF MUTE
[Masterbag, September 1982. Words: Johnny Black. Pictures: David Corio.]
Summary: A witty article on Daniel Miller and the early years of the Mute label. This article later appeared in Bong 14, with some very minor changes. [2141 words]
With many thanks to Gina Gomez for kindly supplying scans of the magazine.

(1)   Not emitting articulate sound:
    Not that you could blame him if his utterances were totally inarticulate, because Daniel Miller has been having a hard and exhausting time. The amiable, deliberately shambling Miller is the head of Mute Records and he’s staring into the muzzle of a double-barrelled shotgun where both cartridges are inscribed with his name.
    To Daniel, one cartridge is financial success, fame, security, and ulcers for life. The other is integrity, fun in music, much less success and a simple life. He’s uncertain which trigger will be pulled first but, either way, he’s the target.
    The success of Depeche Mode and Yazoo has lifted Mute Records onto a plane of operations where Daniel claims to feel a little uncomfortable, but it is tempting to think that behind the façade of the lamb lying down amongst the lions, the modern Daniel will fare as well in the lion’s den as did his biblical counterpart.
(2)   A person dumb by nature or as a result of mutilation:
    If Daniel Miller is dumb, it’s through choice, not nature, although mutilation becomes an interesting word in this context. Mute Records began in his bedroom.
    “I’m not sure if a label starts when you have the idea to put out a record or once you achieve that aim, but I was twenty-five and I’d played with tape recorders since I was a kid. In the early seventies I listened to German groups, and when punk happened it reactivated my interest in music. Punk meant different things to different people and to me the synthesizer was the ideal punk instrument because anyone with ideas can do interesting things without being a great musician.”
    He saved £250 for a second hand Korg 700S and a tape recorder and promptly immersed himself inside his headphones, “working for hours on end, with the volume up to the paint threshold.”
    Mute’s first release, in March 1978, was “TVOD” by The Normal and it was also his first move towards obscurity behind a façade of fame, because The Normal did not exist. “There was only me. I liked the word normal because a lot of people who try hard to be weird are really very ordinary, whereas other people” (who can he be talking about?) “who seem boring and normal have lots of good ideas inside of them.” “TVOD” was a slice of genius, an electronic oddity tailored perfectly to become a cult in its no deposit, no return life cycle.
    At the same time, Miller recorded a number of cover versions of pop standards which later surfaced as mini-hits by the Silicon Teens, yet another front for Daniel to hide his light behind. “I invented a teenage – two girls and two boys – synthesizer pop band. We even went so far as to fake interviews with them but it seemed to be going a bit too far…”
    He had also been made nervous by the good review of “TVOD”, and it was almost as if The Silicon Teens (the mould from which Human League were later remodelled) frightened him more by threatening to have real success. Nevertheless it gave Mute some financial stability and enabled him to work with DAF, the distilled essence of Teutonic adrenal-pumped electro-spasm. As any fool knows, DAF is Fad backwards and Fad Gadget was the first real act to appear on Mute. Can this be mere coincidence?
(3)   To deaden or subdue the sound of a musical instrument.
    Things started going seriously right (or wrong, depending on which trigger is pulled first) when Daniel took a liking to the support band at a Fad Gadget gig in Canning Town. They were Depeche Mode and they were the ones who eventually inflicted G.B.H. on the notion that independent labels can’t have real chart success.
    “They were being looked at by all the major companies,” recalls Miller with relish, “but they seemed intimidated by the big offices and I was just an ordinary bloke. We did the single, “Dreaming Of Me”, and all the big companies were ringing up saying we would never get it into the charts. When it got into the Top 60, I stopped hearing from them, except Muff Winwood at CBS, who phoned to congratulate me. I respect him for that.”
    “New Life”, “Just Can’t Get Enough”, “See You”… the Depeche roll of honour goes on and the hits come in from Germany, Australia, Portugal, bringing more money to Mute than any of the members of The Normal or Silicon Teens had ever dreamed possible.
    When Vince Clarke quit Depeche Mode to form Yazoo with a plumpish female blues singer name of Alf (or sometimes Genevieve) Daniel Miller must have breathed a sigh of relief. Here at last was an act doomed to obscurity, something to reduce Mute back to the chaos of the early days. Unfortunately, the curse of success is not easily cast off, and Yazoo warbled into the charts with “Only You”, followed up with “Don’t Go” and are currently scoring well in America too.
    To the record buying public it looks like an unbelievable success story, but what really happens when a small label is inflicted with the Midas Touch? One of the first things is a cash flow problem. The money generated by a hit single (or five) can take some time to filter back into the company. Royalties can take eternity. Meanwhile, the company has to borrow money to be able to afford to press up and distribute sufficient quantities of new releases to meet an increasing demand. Borrowed money incurs high interest charges and suddenly “It’s like a crash course in how to become a record company. You have problems of staffing, problems of organization, problems just making all the decisions.”
    In the beginning there was only Daniel, but now there’s a full time staff of three, “too much for everybody to do” and plans to employ a book keeper. They’ve moved office once, and will be moving again before the year is out. “We’re permanently on the edge of being totally disorganised but we don’t have time to train any new staff.”
    Mute now has seven acts. Apart from those already mentioned there’s Robert Rental, Liaisons Dangereuses, Non and yet another new German act, Die Doraus Und Die Marinas. As far as Daniel is concerned, he doesn’t want to grow much more. “I originally had no intention of becoming a successful record company, which is a personal problem as much as a business one for me.”
(4)   A kind of mule:
    A mule is a lazy animal which, under the right circumstances, can be made to carry heavy loads and perform useful work. Miller has been described as a workaholic but, he insists, “I’m fundamentally lazy, which forces me to work twice as hard because I know I’ll get nothing done otherwise. People worry about it and try to get me to take holidays but I never get the time.”
    Is he a workaholic? Dave Gahan of Depeche Mode thinks he is. “Definitely. About 95% of his life, including sleep, is devoted to work. He told us he was even dreaming about doing the mix on our single one night.”
    One potential disaster area for Mute must be the possibility that both Depeche and Yazoo might be lured away to major labels by offers of lucrative, long-term deals, but according to Gahan, “We don’t really consider it. We have no firm contract with Daniel but it’s good to be able to deal direct with one man all the tine.”
    “I think Depeche were reasonably financially aware from the beginning,” says Miller. “I’ve always tried to explain to them in detail the way our finances work, the cost of pressing, or why we can’t pay royalties every week because we only get them once a month. They seem to appreciate that. When Vince formed Yazoo, he wasn’t under contract to me, he could have gone elsewhere but he decided to stay. I don’t like to have a heavy contract. When DAF went to Virgin, I was very upset, but it was better that they should go than be stuck on the label with bad feelings.”
    Apart from the business problems he has to contend with, Daniel is also the producer of records at Mute, a state of affairs which suits Depeche Mode very well. “We’re a bit lazy and apathetic, and he drives us a lot. [1] If he doesn’t like the sound, he just refuses to mix it and he’s usually right. He made us totally remix the new single and put new drums on and it sounds much better.”
    Martin Gore, who took over song writing chores when Vince quit Depeche, says, “When we finish recording we just want to go to bed, but Daniel stays up and reads computer manuals until he knows them from back to front.”
    “Where it might take us half an hour to create a particular synth sound, Daniel can usually get it in thirty seconds,” adds Andy Fletcher. “He’s also mad keen on photography. Sometimes he’ll stop in the middle of a mix and start taking pictures. It can be pretty annoying but I think it’s an escape for him.”
(5)   A pack of hounds; also the cry of hounds while working.
    It becomes obvious that, although he no longer actively records his own music, Daniel contributes considerable amounts to the sound of both Depeche and Yazoo. “It is difficult, working with electronic music in a studio, to decide at which point you stop being a musician,” he says. “Half of synthesized music is creating the sounds and I still do a lot of that.”
    The rivalry between Depeche and Yazoo could be another weight on Daniel’s shoulders, but it has the benefit of keeping both outfits sharp. Although Depeche have been around longer, it is Yazoo who appear to be cracking into the vital American market, where “Situation” is number one in the disco charts and bubbling under the national chart.
    “They took the master over there and Americanized it by adding bongos and an awful jazz-synth break in the middle,” reveals Andy, cringing visibly.
    “We were surprised Vince agreed to that because Daniel was against it. The Americans tell us to write dance records, but we’re not prepared to do that just to get a hit,” says Martin.
    The sentiments are echoed by Daniel, saying, “It may be true but I don’t want to push them that way. Depeche have a good following in America, they play to 2,000 people a night but because “See You” wasn’t disco-oriented, it didn’t help.
    Quite apart from business problems, success brings a share of personal agonies. “We were signing autographs in the dressing room after the Hammersmith show. [2] Outside the window was all these blokes trying to crash in, shouting, “We put you there and now you just ignore us”. That kind of thing really hurts us, because we try to sign as many as we can.”
    Like Daniel, Depeche are still having problems adjusting to success. They still like to travel to London on the train, against Daniel’s wishes, even though it has involved them in unpleasant scenes with some of BR’s less savoury drunken commuters. They were amazed by a chauffeur who apologised for the size of the car he picked them up in until they had discovered Mute had ordered a large limousine. “If you start riding around in limousines, people go off you,” says Andy. “Every time we come back to Basildon now, our friends seem a little more distant and we’re away so long that we get out of touch.”
    On the other hand, Daniel is genuinely concerned for their safety and, to him, the increased money coming in enables him to afford better transport for his artists, so why shouldn’t they get what they’ve worked for?
    If Daniel doesn’t have a nervous breakdown, if the cashflow can be regulated, decent offices found and the right staffing level can be achieved, Mute could become the ideal small label with a sound financial base. If Depeche don’t lose all their friends, or succumb to the temptations of the disco hit, or end up feuding with Yazoo, Mute could become the happy family Daniel claims he’d like to have.
    “We’ve had a good year. Maybe next year won’t be so good, but I want to still be in business. It would be easy to get a flash office and lots of staff, but I want to keep it under control. If everybody left and we had no more hits I’d still want to keep releasing the music I enjoy even if I knew it wouldn’t make a lot of money.”
    The Mute man has spoken.
[1] - Or as Alan was to confess years later in Steve Malins' biography: "he's a big fat bloke and he always used to have his trousers hanging down so you could see his arse crack. He'd be standing there on the synth being quite intense and we'd toss peanuts at him, trying to get them down the back of his trousers. He could get a bit stroppy when that happened."
[2] - This will be referring to one of two nights at the Hammersmith Odeon in February 1982: another performance on 25th October 1982 (which obviously had not yet happened) is far better known as it was recorded and provided B-sides for the 1983 singles.
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