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Author Topic: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous  (Read 44603 times)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #15 on: 20 February 2012 - 03:34:11 »
2007-04-06 - Newsday (US) - Dave Gahan attending Knicks vs. Timberwolves game

http://www.newsday.com/sports/hopes-on-ropes-1.609305

(...) ... Alicia Keys, Lou Reed and Depeche Mode lead singer David Gahan were in attendance.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #16 on: 20 February 2012 - 03:34:26 »
2007-04-06 - Meetup (US) - Meetup report

http://www.meetup.com/alleywatch/messages/boards/thread/2939106

March was a very successful Meetup for us. We were mentioned on Mashable.com as being the group where Ventbox launched its platform. There were also excellent presentations by both GCB Media and PumpOne. At the end of the evening when I left the venue, I met Dave Gahan, lead singer of Depeche Mode!
We have over 500 registered members, and we're seeing new people register for the group everyday. Bring your friends and show them what our community is all about. We were recently named the fifth largest New Technology group by Meetup.com!
We looking forward to seeing both familiar and new faces in April. Bring your business cards and an appetite as the Mixx Lounge has a full menu of food and drinks to choose from!
If you have any questions please contact me!

Brett

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #17 on: 20 February 2012 - 03:35:21 »
2007-10-11 - Channel 4 Teletext (UK) - Planet Sound

http://www.depeche-mode.com/forum/index.php?topic=22095.0

Gustavo Santaolalla has sent some music to Gahan which he "carried with me everywhere" on Depeche Mode's tour.
Gahan told PS: "It's a very interesting offer, it's just a matter of timing.  I write in a very visual, filmic way anyway.  I play characters a lot in my songs, they just tend to all be me."

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #18 on: 20 February 2012 - 03:37:17 »
2007-xx-xx - t-spheres - Press release (excerpt)

[Dave Gahan's wife Jennifer did a commercial for t-spheres in 2005.]

http://www.tspheres.com/index.php

“Quite simply, I use the t spheres wherever & whenever possible, and that is pretty much anywhere." - Dave Gahan, Depeche Mode
Dave Gahan has a personal infusion “xtreme sport for pain relief” for his 60mm t-spheres SPORT.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #19 on: 20 February 2012 - 03:37:35 »
2009-04-23 - Biography about Dave Gahan

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dave-Gahan-Trevor-Baker/dp/1906191115

Dave Gahan: Depeche Mode & The Second Coming [Paperback]
Trevor Baker

 

Paperback: 208 pages
Publisher: Independent Music Press; First edition (5 Nov 2009)
Language: English and German
ISBN-10: 1906191115
ISBN-13: 978-1906191115
Product Dimensions: 23 x 15.2 x 2.4 cm

The first and only biography of one of music's most influential and enigmatic characters. Dave Gahan's extraordinary life as the frontman of one of modern music's most successful bands is a tale unrivalled in rock and roll folklore. From a colourful childhood and youth in Essex, Gahan went on to become a huge star all over the world. For years each Depeche Mode album was more successful than the one before but in 1995 the increasing pressures on the band and within Gahan's personal life almost killed him. From this harrowing abyss, Gahan has bounced back and forged a new acclaimed career as a solo artist. Gahan's stunning rehabilitation as a songwriter and rejuvenated frontman means he deserves his own chapter in music history this unauthorised biography includes new and exclusive interviews with numerous people who ve worked with and around Gahan. Aside from recounting his turbulent private battles, this first ever book on Gahan examines his musical legacy and suggests he is arguably Britain's most under-rated and interesting rock vocalist. Recounted for the very first time, Gahan's tale away from his band-mates overshadows even the remarkable story of Depeche Mode the combination of his difficult yet triumphant story plus the thrilling music he has recorded, make this a story like no other in rock and roll history.
About the Author:
Trevor Baker is a freelance journalist based in London. He writes for The Guardian and has written numerous books including the acclaimed 2008 biography for I.M.P: Richard Ashcroft: The Verve, Burning Money & The Human Condition and in 2009 Thom Yorke: Radiohead & Trading Solo.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #20 on: 26 April 2012 - 02:23:14 »
2009-06-04 - The Observer (US) - Depeche Mode’s Dave Gahan Sells $4 M. Condo, Buys $6 M. Penthouse

http://www.observer.com/2009/real-estate/depeche-modes-dave-gahan-sells-4-m-condo-buys-6-m-penthouse

By Max Abelson
Depeche Mode’s Dave Gahan Sells $4 M. Condo, Buys $6 M. Penthouse

Dave Gahan, the lead singer of the melodramatic synth-pop outfit Depeche Mode, has sold his three-bedroom, 1,920-square-foot loft at 99 Jane Street for $4 million, according to a deed filed Thursday afternoon. The apartment, with a soaking tub and separate shower in the master suite, went to the well-named buyer Atalanti Martinou.
Brown Harris Stevens listing broker Cordelia Robb had no comment.
Mr. Gahan, who underwent surgery last month to remove a low-grade malignant tumor from his bladder, made an upgrade: City records show that he and his wife, Jennifer, closed earlier this year on a $5,956,250 penthouse at Battery Park City’s hilariously eco-friendly condo Riverhouse. The couple and Leonardo DiCaprio will both be getting twice-filtered air and solar-powered energy at their new building.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #21 on: 09 May 2012 - 15:08:59 »
2009-07-06 - Spinner (UK) - infected mushroom get perry farrell to sub for dave gahan

http://www.spinnermusic.co.uk/2009/07/06/infected-mushroom-get-perry-farrell-to-sub-for-dave-gahan/

Israeli trance/rock duo Infected Mushroom has not only built up a sizable live following (even serving as one of the headliners for the recent Electric Daisy Carnival in L.A. that drew 135,000 fans over two days), they have also apparently established a solid reputation among fellow musicians.
The group's new album, 'Legend of the Black Shawarma,' was executive produced by superstar DJ Paul Oakenfold, and features Korn's Jonathan Davis, Velvet Revolver drummer Matt Sorum and Perry Farrell on the track 'Killing Time.' But Infected Mushroom's Amir Duvdevani tells Spinner 'Killing Time' was originally supposed to feature another guest vocalist. "I had Dave Gahan from Depeche Mode [to] sing that song but he canceled when the Depeche Mode tour started," Duvdevani says.
It was a case of oh-so-close for the Infected guys. "He never did a collaboration, ever," Duvdevani says. "So when he agreed it was weird cause [it was like], 'Wow, he probably really likes the song.' It didn't happen because Depeche Mode was late with the album, but I hope in the future. He's really one of my favorite all-time singers."
Still, having Perry Farrell as a backup is a pretty sweet consolation prize and Duvdevani found the Jane's frontman was flatteringly down with Infected Mushroom. "I went to Perry and he said, 'I really like the song, let's do it,'" Duvdevani recalls. "He knew Infected Mushroom really well and he had our first LPs. It was crazy."

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #22 on: 09 May 2012 - 15:17:04 »
2009-10-27 - Bowie: A Biography by Marc Spitz:

https://books.google.com/books?id=JrvOjdqP1GAC&pg=PA193&lpg=PA193

"Bowie represented a way for me to get out of myself, and also to escape from where I was, Dave Gahan of Depeche Mode recalled. "[My hometown] Basildon was a factory, working-class town. Bowie gave me a hope that there was something else. This world that he seemed to be part of — where was it? I wanted to find it. I just thought he wasn't of this earth. And that was really attractive to me, to live in a different persona."



2010-03-27 - Depeche Mode - Dave Gahan Officially Adopts Son James Nicholas Rogers-Gahan

http://www.depechemode.com/news.html

David marked the joyous occasion of the formal adoption of James Nicholas Rogers-Gahan, the son of his wife of eleven years, Jennifer Sklias-Gahan in New York City on Wednesday March 24th. Jimmy officially joins David's other two children -- daughter Stella Rose Gahan, and son, Jack Gahan.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #23 on: 09 May 2012 - 15:24:32 »
2010-05-07 - Dave Gahan auctions his platinum award frames for charity:

http://stores.ebay.com/Auction-Doctors_MUSIC-MEMORABILIA__W0QQ_fsubZ5QQ_sidZ2966976QQ_trksidZp4634Q2ec0Q2em322
http://www.twilightillusion.net/andthen/2010/05/11/dave-gahan-donates-sotu-awards-to-charity/

Dave has donated a nice collection of his European gold and platinum awards to the non-profit Inter-Care for a series of fundraising auctions. Inter-Care was hand-chosen by Dave to be the recipient of proceeds. Based in New York, they provide comprehensive services for families and individuals affected by alcohol and drug addiction.
http://www.inter-care.com.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #24 on: 09 May 2012 - 15:34:54 »
2010-09-xx - How's Your Dad (UK) - Jack Gahan Extracts

[Bought and typed out on the Internet by me.]

How’s Your Dad?: Living in the shadow of a Rock Star parent
By Zoë Street Howe

In chapter: on the road, in the studio, in the blood
Depeche Mode singer Dave Gahan would often bring his son Jack, named after Dave’s stepfather, on tour with him. Jack was even featured (as a baby) in the Depeche Mode tour documentary 101, much to fans’ delight.
When I first see Jack strolling up to me in Westbourne Grove in his leather jacket, I find it hard not to be struck by how much he resembles both his mother, Joanne Fox, a former punk scenester, and his father. Jack and Dave are also alike in character, he tells me, sharing the same kind of humour. We have tea in his flat nearby, with King Tubby Meets Rockers Uptown echoing away in the background and a whiff of incense in the air. Our original interview was postponed by way of apologetic email telling me that his dad was in LA and wanted to watch the football with him. I found this all the more touching when I later discovered that Dave Gahan wasn’t into football at all, but is now developing a liking for it because he knows Jack is a fan. (This was also shortly after Gahan’s senior operation on a malignant tumour in his bladder, discovered after he fell ill in his dressing room just before going onstage on Depeche Mode’s Tour of the Universe in May 2009.)
Jack Gahan, 22 at the time of our interview, would have been too young to spend time with his dad on the road when Dave was on the throes of his heroin addiction, which finally came to a head in 1996 when the singer had a near-death experience after speedballing. (He recalls a ‘blackness’ and hearing his third and current wife, Jennifer, calling him back. It’s no coincidence she plays an angel for Depeche Mode’s 2006 single ‘Suffer Well’.) But by the time Jack was 13, he’d be allowed to spend his school holidays hanging out with Depeche Mode when most 13-year-olds would be heading to summer camps or stacking shelves in Asda.
Being on tour with his father allowed Jack to see his parent getting on with his job. As a result, he garnered insights from the music industry from the inside and learned to naturally behave respectfully on tour and in the studio.
“I was around when they’d be mixing or recording in London, but as I got older I realised it’s like going to work. You don’t want to be in the way, the last thing I want to do is intrude on anything. That was always quite a clear line, the same goes for being on tour. It’s very much work for my dad, and he sees it very much like anyone would a normal job.”
The work-ethic is strong, the long-standing crew is like a family and Dave Gahan for one is more likely to head back to his hotel room than to sniff out the nearest party. That’s not to say they don’t have fun when Jack and his family join the group on the road. “Playing ‘foozeball’, we do that quite a lot!” says Jack. “And I love the atmosphere building up before the show, chatting with the guys, travelling with my family and being at all these venues in America where there’d be little games machines with mini basketballs and stuff. Being in amazing countries, seeing amazing landscapes.
“I love seeing the shows. I’ve grown up around it, it’s embedded in me, I can listen and watch and appreciate it for different reasons that a fan would. When I was 13 I went out for the Exciter tour, it was all the craze that time to have those little scooters, we (himself, his cousins and stepbrother) all had them and were going round and round the hotel on these things, and at the gig!
Up until the last few years I’d be just with my dad, we’d go and see a movie or something. It’s well past the phase, certainly for my dad, of the whole partying side, it’s just nice to hang out. “

In chapter: drugs
Depeche Mode’s Dave Gahan also cheated death [like Jack Bruce] several times. (They don’t call him ‘The Cat’ for nothing.) He suffered a heart attack during the time of his split with his first wife, Jo, but he defied advice and continued touring. Q magazine pronounced the band’s 1993 Devotional tour “The Most Debauched Rock ‘n’ Roll Tour Ever”, in slaveringly congratulatory tone. His well-publicised problem with heroin and alcohol hurtled into further self-destruction when he survived a suicide attempt in 1995; he had slashed his wrists, later confessing it was a cry for help. The following year he overdosed on a speedball – a combination of cocaine and heroin – at the Sunset Marquis in Hollywood. He died for two minutes before being revived.
There’s a clip of Gahan being interviewed by Johnny Vaughan on YouTube in his hotel room during the 1993 tour, Vaughan conducting the interview in typical cocky style, Gahan gracious but out of it. The comments beneath the clip range from amused to shocked to impressed, but the reality is heartbreaking considering it would not be long after this when Gahan would make an attempt on his own life.
There is a tinge of jovial mockery about the interview, but the interviewee is in trouble. When asked his ‘top tips’ for kids wanting to become a rock star, Gahan looks away and mumbles, “Stay away from the drink and drugs”, and becomes briefly lost in a private moment. Then Vaughan cheerily presents him with a gift: Gahan’s camping knife from when he was a child, carved with his name. The singer laughs and immediately pretends to commit hara-kiri. Maybe it’s hindsight that made this clip particularly alarming.
Jack Gahan was very young when his father, at this point living in LA, was at his lowest ebb. (Fortunately Dave now insists his only addictions are dark chocolate and Curb Your Enthusiasm.) Jack is philosophical on the subject of his father’s past. It might have looked as if Dave Gahan was determined to embrace the life of a rock stereotype at seemingly any cost, but for Jack it is enough to know his dad did eventually gain control of his darker side for the sake of his family. Dave told the Washington Post: “I had a wake-up call and it’s enabled me to not be afraid of growing. Facing up to real responsibilities in my life – I’m not talking about the band, I’m talking about my family, my beautiful wife, my children.”
“I wasn’t so much protected from knowing about it because I was just too young to know about it, “ explains Jack. “It was the same sort of time as the marital split, ’92, ’93, ’94. I used to visit Dad like normal, it didn’t change a lot for me, it was more my dad really. It was hard for my mum. I didn’t really know what was going on.
“The worst thing would be to have to keep it a secret. It’s just a part of what makes him who he is now. That was a stage in his life when he was doing something he may not be particularly proud of looking back on, but at the same time it happened, and he’s very open about it. It’s better for me that way too. Hiding things like that… it got to the point where it was so publicised he couldn’t hide it anyway, but it’s 13 or 14 years he’s been sober, he’s still very serious about that. That’s the best way to look at it.”

In chapter: following the footsteps
Jack Gahan remembers his father, Dave's, very considered choices of CDs to pass on to his son in order to educate him in 'good music'. "Led Zeppelin, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Dark Side of the Moon," remembers Jack.

In chapter: “So, how’s your dad?”
[Upon being asked how he feels when strangers ask “How’s you dad?”]
“The “How’s your dad?” thing? I can always tell when someone’s going to do that,” laughs Jack Gahan. “I can almost pre-empt it! But I’m aware that it would be there. Maybe there are expectations from other people, I suppose you could think, ‘Maybe they want to work with me, or hang out because they know who my dad is and the might think that would give them a leg up in some way,’ but I’d hope that I’d be able to tell. The fans are really nice, I like it really.”

Who’s who? And what they do…
Jack Gahan: (Born 1988) Works for LiveNation. Also a guitarist and songwriter. Son of Dave Gahan and his first wife, Joanne Fox.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #25 on: 09 May 2012 - 16:20:34 »
2010-10-21 - Popbitch.com (UK) - Dave Gahan has an impressive organ

http://agentbedhead.com/index.php/archive/depeche-modes-dave-gahan-has-a-big-one/
www.tofangsazan-the.blogspot.com/2010/10/popbitch.html

POPBITCH: ISSUE 519
Songs of Faith & Devotion
Dave Gahan has an impressive organ
 
Dave Gahan, from Depeche Mode, took delivery of a full-sized church pipe organ at his Montauk home this week.
Bet the neighbours are thrilled...

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #26 on: 09 May 2012 - 21:36:37 »
2010-11-02 - According 2 G (U.S.) - Dave Gahan attends Recoil Show

[N.B. Depeche Mode fans had a sense that Dave Gahan was going to attend, because Alan Wilder had tweeted earlier that Recoil's gig in New York would have a "very special guest", and that he had met an old friend named "Mister G" shortly before the gig. But of course the fans had hoped that Dave would be performing rather than just watching.]

http://according2g.com/2010/11/dave-gahan-attends-recoil-show-featuring-dms-alan-wilder/

Dave Gahan attends Recoil Show (Featuring DM’s Alan Wilder)
What could be better than having your mind blown by seeing Florence and the Machine in concert for the first time?  I know!  How about rushing to the opposite side of town to see a member of one of your all time favorite bands (Alan Wilder of Depeche Mode) performing live with his musical project Recoil.  As an added (and extra amazing) bonus, Depeche Mode’s lead singer Dave Gahan was in attendance watching the show!  I unfortunately missed seeing the opening acts, but I got to the Highline Ballroom at 10:30 pm just as Recoil hit the stage.  They performed for a little over an hour in a megamix format that featured banging beats and trippy visuals.  Unfortunately, Dave Gahan did not perform with Recoil, but a dark industrial instrumental of Depeche Mode’s “Never Let Me Down Again” was played during the set.  I met Alan Wilder after the show and he was really cool.  A photo of that encounter is coming soon, so stay tuned.  After the jump, see my secret spy picture of Dave Gahan that I took.


Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #27 on: 09 May 2012 - 21:41:25 »
2011-03-11 - NY Times (U.S.) - Godfathers of Glam

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/t-magazine/mens-fashion/2011_mens_wellrockers.html



Godfathers of glam who can still rock a skinny suit.

Dave Gahan:
Later this year, Depeche Mode is scheduled to release ‘‘Remixes 2: 81-11,’’ an album comprised of original and new arrangements spanning the band’s entire career.
Roberto Cavalli jacket, $4,615, and pants, $2,285. Go to robertocavalli.com. His own Tom Ford shirt. His own boots and jewelry.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #28 on: 25 June 2012 - 04:30:24 »
2011-07-07 - MNN (US) - Wet bandits: Biggest water hogs in the Hamptons revealed

http://www.mnn.com/your-home/at-home/blogs/wet-bandits-biggest-water-hogs-in-the-hamptons-revealed

Wet bandits: Biggest water hogs in the Hamptons revealed
In the Hamptons, land of golf course-sized lawns, top water-guzzlers include Depeche Mode crooner Dave Gahan and J. Crew's Mickey Drexler, whose home consumed 18.4 million gallons of water in 2010.

(...)

And unless you're familiar with hedge funders and hoteliers, there’s no real big bold face names on the list save for church organ enthusiast and Depeche Mode singer Dave Gahan, whose home on South Davis Avenue in Montauk consumed 717,000 gallons of water in 2010. When it comes to H2O, it looks like Gahan truly just can’t get enough.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: Dave Gahan: Miscellaneous
« Reply #29 on: 25 June 2012 - 04:30:36 »
2011-08-04 - Interview Magazine (U.S.) - Frida Giannini

[Dave Gahan is INTERVIEWING Frida Giannini.]

http://www.interviewmagazine.com/fashion/frida-giannini-2/

Frida Giannini
By Dave Gahan

In addition to fashion, which she creates for a living, and music, which she listens to constantly and collects voraciously in styl- ishly antiquated vinyl form, Frida Giannini is a bit of a gearhead. In fact, she claims to have come up with some of her best ideas in cars. So it’s appropriate that as Giannini attempts to make good use of what’s left of the summer by shuttling between her office in Rome and her beach house in the town of Sabaudia (on the Italian coast) behind the wheel of her Audi Q7 SUV, the Gucci designer would take the opportunity to contemplate the Italian house’s yearlong celebration of its 90th anniversary. That mile marker is punctuated by the recent launch of the 1921 Collection—a line of ready-to-wear clothes and accessories inspired by some of the more iconic materials and moments in Gucci’s history—and a blowout event set to take place next month at the new Gucci museum in the company’s original hometown of Florence, where many items from the run of the house’s vast archives will be made available for public viewing for the first time.
For most of Giannini’s tenure at Gucci—serving as a designer for the last nine years and the house’s creative director for the last five—outrunning the past has been a complicated endeavor, both in terms of the near-mythic aura that surrounds founder Guccio Gucci’s beginnings as a purveyor of leather goods and luggage, whose earnest admiration for luxe handiwork beget an interna- tional empire, and in terms of the more palpable aura that still surrounds the label’s previous creative director, Tom Ford. But Giannini has acquitted herself ably on all fronts, crafting a new chapter in the Gucci story by embracing her own ultra-feminine take on fashion, one that doesn’t so much wrestle with what was, or the iconographic power of those interlocking Gs, as display an unbridled enthusiasm for what is and what might be if we could only find a way to chill out and live in the now.
Depeche Mode front man Dave Gahan recently connected with the 38-year-old Giannini, who was in Florence for work, to discuss Gucci’s big nine-oh and why it’s important to at least peek in the rearview before racing off into the future.

DAVE GAHAN: Congratulations on the anniversary.
FRIDA GIANNINI: Thank you very much.

GAHAN: I’m sure it’s an amazing thing to be part of something that’s lasted so long. I sort of know how that feels, having been in a band that’s been around . . . not quite as long as Gucci, but, you know, we’ve been together for 31 years now, and when you look back on that, it’s quite an achievement. There’s a lot of his- tory. Your more recent collections reference the history of Gucci maybe a bit more than your collections did when you first started. When you first went into the Gucci archives, what did you find?
GIANNINI: Well, when I joined Gucci in 2002, I immediately wanted to make a research trip into the archives because I’d heard about how incredible they were, but I never had the opportunity to visit them. But, I tell you, I was shocked when I got into them, because the Gucci archives are full of all these incredible objects and items from about the ’40s through the ’60s and ’70s. There are these incredible handbags and pieces of home furniture or objects for lifestyle, like tennis or golf. They did many designs for cars and seats in the ’70s, and there are all these original draw- ings of prints and flowers, which are also tremendously inspiring for me because I can pick some older design or object and rework it—bring it to new life. In designing for Gucci, I always love to make some sort of stylistic marriage between past, present, and future, because this brand has a huge history. There’s 90 years of tradition and ideas about excellence and expertise in luxury goods and craftsmanship that have been handed down over generations. We still have some suppliers working with us today who are the sons and daughters of the old suppliers who used to work for the original Gucci family at the beginning of the last century. So it’s nice to always create this balance between what has been done in the past and what you want to do in the future.

GAHAN: I like to do the same thing with music. It’s important for me to know where music evolved from and bring it to the future. I actually wanted to ask you, is it correct that you have a room in your house where you have over 7,000 vinyl records?
GIANNINI: I have 8,000 now, but yes. [laughs]

GAHAN: I understand it’s one of your favorite rooms.
GIANNINI: Yes, it is. The reason I have all these vinyl records is that my uncle was a DJ who was quite popular in Italy in the ’80s. Unfortunately he was in a car accident and passed away at the end of the ’80s. But he was basically like my big brother because there wasn’t much difference in age between me and him. So I inher- ited this collection of vinyl records, which at that time numbered 6,000, and I’ve since continued to collect music. As you know, vinyl records can be very heavy, so every time I have to move into a new house, I need to build a complete new wall of shelves to put all these records, which is a nightmare for the architect. But I have to say, I’m so proud because it’s really special for me to have this collection. I have many memories of the music of my uncle, and also because there are so many beautiful covers. I love the covers of vinyl records.

GAHAN: How did you first get interested in fashion? Was it through music? Or was it something that you were interested in independently?
GIANNINI: Well, I always loved the look of musicians. I’ve always admired them because they have a look—when I was growing up, it seemed that the ones I liked didn’t need to have a stylist. Now there is this trend where everyone has a stylist, or follows the suggestions of a stylist, from designers on down. But I have some memories of looking at David Bowie in the ’70s, and he had this look that was so authentic and original, which I think is more genuine in a way for a musician, and also very intriguing from the designer’s point of view. I grew up in Rome, in actually what I would say was a liberal, open-minded family. My father was an architect and my mother was a teacher of art history, so it was sort of intellectual, and maybe a bit much for me when I was a child. But it was quite interesting when I was growing up. I have to say that my passion for designing and draw- ing was immediate—I drew all the time when I was 4, 5 years old. My grandmother also had a boutique in Rome. Now she’s almost 90 years old, and she just closed her boutique 10 years ago. But I have many memories of playing with the mannequins and bits of fabric and clothes in the shop window and in the shop upstairs from my grandmother’s. So I don’t know . . . Maybe I was in love with fashion, with clothes, since I was a child. But when I was a teenager, it was music. I listened to a lot of music. I loved Depeche Mode. [laughs] I remember when I was 15 years old I was trying to imitate Madonna and look like she did in “Like a Virgin” with the lace gloves, leggings, and everything like that. I dyed my hair and all these kinds of things. So fashion was about a kind of expression for me.

GAHAN: That’s interesting, because those two things—music and fashion—sort of went together for me as well. After high school I went to art college, but I became much more interested in the way that fashion and music combined, because when I was a teenager, punk music had arrived in England with the Sex Pis- tols and The Clash and The Damned, and the whole style of being individual and dressing differently, which appealed to me. Like you, I also grew up with David Bowie and T. Rex and these bands that were much larger than life. I would watch them per- form on TV as a teenager, and I wasn’t very good at a lot of things, but I felt like I could do what those guys did.
GIANNINI: That influence, and the connection between music and fashion in the U.K., was strong at that time, right?

GAHAN: Yeah, it was really a powerful thing. For a short time I actually studied fashion—for about a year—and some of my friends were going on to Central Saint Martins [College of Art & Design] in London, so I thought I might take that route. But Depeche Mode was beginning, and we had created a little follow- ing, so I decided to go that route.
GIANNINI: Well, at a certain point, I made the decision to study fashion. I remember having a great discussion with my parents because they wanted me to go to a more conservative university and to study something safer, but I insisted and pushed to study fashion, and so I started at the [Fashion] Academy in Rome when I was 19 years old, and afterwards I went to work for some more ready-to-wear houses in Rome before I moved to Fendi, and eventually came to Gucci as the head designer of handbags. And my career at Gucci started at that time...

GAHAN: What inspires me is usually very visual— and it sounds like inspiration works like that for you, too. Where do you get inspiration from these days?
GIANNINI: Well, you know, inspiration for a designer can come from many different sides and directions, because you can be inspired by a place after a trip, or by an exhibition of art, or from music, as we were mentioning before, or from movies, from films. You can also be influenced by an age, like the ’60s or ’70s. This year, for example, I feel more ’90s, or I want to see something more futuristic. So there’s not a specific rule I would say, because every six months I need to think of something new. It really depends on your mood or your personal life sometimes . . . I can tell you that sometimes I live a very good moment and I’m very joy- ful and optimistic, so I can see more bright colors in my collection. [laughs] Other times I feel so depressed and so sad and I see a lot of darkness. So it really depends. Of course, there are certain rules you have to operate by in terms of markets, and for summer and for winter. But at the end of the day, you are a person and you put a lot of yourself into the clothes. You know, I can never decide what I am going to wear on the day of the show. It depends a lot on which mood I wake up in that day, so I never know. You just never know. I think this is interest- ing for this job, no?

GAHAN: Yeah. [both laugh] So I’d imagine you’re working a lot.
GIANNINI: Yeah, a lot.

GAHAN: What do you like to do when you’re not working?
GIANNINI: Well, I grew up in fashion. I’m still growing in fashion. But I love to do other things as well. I love architecture and design. I love to read books, especially on furniture, décor, and design. Of course, I still love music and going to con- certs. I also love horse riding, which is a big passion. I used to do horse riding in a competitive way until I was 18 years old and I started to work and it got too complicated for me, so now I go just for the weekend or in summertime when I have more time, because I need a lot of training for horse riding. You need to have good legs and good shoulders. I love cooking. I have big kitchens in my house in Rome and my other one on the beach because I love to spend a lot of time cutting vegetables, cooking fish, and all these kinds of things. I love to have a lot of friends in my house and to prepare dinner for them. And I love movies, even though I’m not a fan of the cinema. I don’t like to go to the cinema because I feel very claustrophobic, so I prefer to watch a DVD at my house with a home theater. But that’s about it. [laughs] I would say that is more or less what I’m doing when I’m not working.

GAHAN: I know you love cars, and that you came up with the name for the Guilty fragrance while driving.
GIANNINI: Yes.

GAHAN: What kind of car do you drive?
GIANNINI: Actually, at this moment, I have the Q7SUV from Audi.

GAHAN: Well, that’s very interesting, because I’m driving the Audi R8, the V10.
GIANNINI: Oh, really? Well, you know, for me it’s very helpful because I have a big dog. He’s a Ger- man shepherd, and sometimes when I have to move to my house on the beach I need to take a lot of stuff with me, as well as my friends and my dog. So I need to have big space in my car for all of that.

GAHAN: We have a big car too, because of the kids and the dogs and stuff. But then it’s also my personal car—my toy.
GIANNINI: I am the same. I think it’s more comfortable for me to drive a big car, because I feel safer than in a smaller one. Plus, it’s cooler.