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Author Topic: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.  (Read 5653 times)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #15 on: 29 June 2012 - 00:36:04 »
1989-xx-xx - Pop&Rock (Czechoslovakia) - Counterfeit Review

[Thanks to Milik for offering to send in this scan!]


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #16 on: 29 June 2012 - 00:36:24 »
1989-xx-xx - Rock & Pop (Czechoslovakia) - Counterfeit Review

[Thanks to Milik for offering to send in this scan!]


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #17 on: 02 July 2012 - 04:13:03 »
1989-xx-xx - Unknown Magazine (Czechoslovakia) - Counterfeit Review

[Thanks to Milik for offering to send in this scan!]


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #18 on: 23 September 2013 - 02:43:24 »
1990-04-07 - OOR (Netherlands) - Sex, God & Synthesizers (page 4)

[Scanned by me.]



(...)

Het mag dan duidelijk zijn dat Martin Gore muzikaal de dienst uitmaakt binnen Depeche Mode, een en ander verschaft hem echter niet all vrijheid: de korte vakantie die de groep na het uitbrengen van de voorlaatste studioplaat Music For The Masses (zo'n titel bood voorlopig voldoende voer voor kwaadwillenden) inlaste, gebruikte Gore voor het opnemen van een mini-solo-album met louter covers, The Counterfeit EP. Hierop vonden 's mans all-time favourites hun weg in een muzikaal jasje dat in niets verschilde van het groepsgeluid. Over het hoe en waarom is hij uiterst bescheiden. "Het was een project dat ik al heel lang wilde doen. Ik had er plotseling tijd voor. Maar ik heb er verder geen enkele promotie voor gedaan. Geen single, geen video, geen interviews. Gewoon de plaat gemaakt en uitgebracht. Ik had dat project ook met de hele groep kunnen doen, maar dan was er een compromis uitgerold. Onze smaken verschillen nogal extreem, namelijk."

(...)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #19 on: 23 September 2013 - 02:43:37 »
1994-xx-xx - La Época (Chile) - Counterfeit Review

[1994 is when this EP was released in Chile.]

http://members.fortunecity.com/martsdrink/gore/epoca.html

Counterfeit
Martin Gore. Tecno. (24.1) Cassette CNR. 4-13230.
 
La primera particularidad de este disco es que es un proyecto personal de Martin Gore, miembro fundador del grupo Depeche Mode. La segunda es que siendo Gore, además de guitarrista, fundamentalmente el compositor de esa banda, este disco suyo está hecho sólo con canciones ajenas. La tercera es que cualquiera de los temas que aparecen, de acuerdo a su sonido, podría haber formado parte de cualquiera de los discos del conjunto nombrado. Gore frasea con voz profunda, y a veces incluso recita seis canciones de melodías nostálgicas y agradables. Las primeras tres mantienen una tensión triste, que en las siguientes desaparece para dar paso a otras tantas algo más monótonas. Counterfeit apareció en Inglaterra en 1989 y acaba de ser editado oficialmente en Chile.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #20 on: 23 September 2013 - 02:44:25 »
2003-04-xx - Compact N°33 (France) - Martin Gore interview

[Thanks to karimamilena for scanning this! On the last page of this interview, Martin is asked about his first Counterfeit release:]



Translation by me:

(...)

At the time prior to the release Counterfeit 1, I found myself having a lot of free time because the others were mixing the 101 record. I had recorded six songs and I told myself, "It's good enough for an EP!", which was probably not very smart, because the format does not correspond to anything, too short for an album, too long for a single... Commercially, it didn't make any sense! Anyway, I didn't have any press, and I had done no interview anywhere!

(...)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #21 on: 23 September 2013 - 02:44:38 »
2003-xx-xx - Laut.de (Germany) - Auf MTV werden meine Songs  nicht laufen

http://www.laut.de/Martin-L-Gore

(...)

Wenn du die Möglichkeit hättest, dein erstes Album noch einmal aufzunehmen, was würdest du verändern?
Ich denke es war ein Fehler, das Album als EP zu veröffentlichen. Die Bandbreite war einfach zu schmal, um einen ausführlichen Einblick in meinen Musikgeschmack zu geben. Mal davon abgesehen, dass sich seit 1989 natürlich auch die Technik sehr viel weiter entwickelt hat, war meine Herangehensweise schon für damalige Verhältnisse sehr schlicht und reduziert. Ich habe alles alleine bei mir zu Hause programmiert und war nur kurz mit dem Produzenten Rico Conning im Studio. Es mag also letztlich etwas zu simpel ausgefallen sein, aber ich bedaure es auch nicht wirklich. Ich denke, es ist schon okay.

(...)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #22 on: 23 September 2013 - 02:44:57 »
2012-01-26 - Documentary Evidence (UK) - Counterfeit Review

http://www.documentaryevidence.co.uk/martin_l_gore_counterfeit.htm

Counterfeit EP
mute records | lp/cd/c stumm67 | 06/1989

Counterfeit was Martin L. Gore's first solo release outside of Depeche Mode. A collection of six covers ranging from The Durutti Column to Sparks, Gore's voice voice is here allowed to shine through rather than being relegated to backing vocals or only appearing on the more poignant ballads of the Depeche back catalogue that were less suited to nominal frontman Dave Gahan's vocal style. Counterfeit was produced by Gore and Rico Conning, and released by Mute in 1989 while Depeche Mode were on downtime between the Music For The Masses and Violator albums. Never a band to go for cover versions (off the top of my head I can only count three, including one Beethoven piece), hearing Gore delivering other people's songs is something of a rare, and absorbing, proposition.

Opening with a cover of Joe Crow's 'Compulsion', things start off in relatively upbeat territory. Sometime Nightingales member Crow's solitary and pretty obscure Cherry Red 7" is here delivered as an affirming, strident track, all upbeat pianos, pulsing percussion and melodica-style synths. I used to listen to this occasionally after disappointing events took place (usually getting dumped by a girl), the 'got to move on sometime' refrain and the gentle piano somehow allowing me to transcend whatever I was feeling miserable about. Nearly twenty years on from when I first bought this, it still never fails to work. 'In A Manner Of Speaking' was originally recorded by Tuxedomoon and appeared on their Holy Wars LP. Gore's version includes a vaguely Latin rhythm in the style of Depeche Mode's 'To Have And To Hold' from Music For The Masses, underpinned by a dark synth bass pulse. 'In A Manner Of Speaking' is filled with a theatrical drama, and to add to the mood Gore speaks his way through the final section, its elliptical lyric about telling someone everything by saying nothing making a level of sense on an emotional level.

The cover of Factory Records' stalwart Vini Reilly's 'Smile In The Crowd' again opts for a Latin-style arrangement, a thin, pondering guitar line running throughout most of the track. This cover of the Durutti Column song is perhaps the closest Counterfeit comes to the bleak, inward-looking balladry that Gore's own performances on record tend to lean toward. Meanwhile 'Gone', originally delivered by The Comsat Angels, has a cloying urgency, mining the same vibe of danger and helplessness that powered 'A Question Of Time', riding forth on a pulsing beat marked by thick bass notes and industrial tension.

Gore's cover of Sparks' 'Never Turn Your Back On Mother Earth' finds Gore taking Ron Mael's beguiling, simple ode to the planet we live on and maintaining that sense of grace over a fragile, gentle backdrop of acoustic guitar and shimmering percussion. Tempted to make this plaintive song a whole lot darker though you might have expected Gore to be, instead the sense of wonderment of the Sparks original is maintained, Gore even having a decent crack at Russell Mael's falsetto, highlighting the lead Depeche Mode songwriter's strong vocal range. Gore saves the darkness for his take on the traditional song 'Motherless Child', here cast as a edgy jazz number, the dark swing of Gore's introspective vocal delivered like an unused track from Cabaret.

Counterfeit is a relatively unassuming record, considering how big Depeche Mode had become by this point. Gore's emotional outpourings have always been popular with fans (check out the deafening cheers after one of Gore's solo performances in the middle of a Depeche Mode stadium show), and hearing his effortless ownership of these six songs is one of the genuine highlights of his body of vocal work. A follow-up to this EP would be released by Mute in 2003 containing more unexpected reworkings of other bands' material.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #23 on: 24 September 2013 - 05:01:49 »
2012-05-09 - The Daily Swarm (US) - VCMG Interview

http://www.thedailyswarm.com/swarm/firsts-vince-clarke-and-martin-gore/

(...)

The Daily Swarm: Martin, do you remember your first solo EP, and what led up to it?
MG: The others were busy in the studio mixing a live record, and it didn’t seem very important that I be there. The time felt right to do something, and I’d always fancied the idea of doing some covers. I still like doing covers. It shows people a side of you they don’t necessarily know.

(...)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #24 on: 09 February 2014 - 04:14:07 »
2014-02-08 - Electricity Club (UK) - Interview with Odile Arias of Vienna

http://www.electricity-club.co.uk/missing-in-action-vienna/

(...)

Influenced by KRAFTWERK and Synth Britannia acts such as DEPECHE MODE, OMD and GARY NUMAN, VIENNA sounded like a dreamy, less industrialised cousin of HARD CORPS who had supported DEPECHE MODE during the ‘Music For The Masses’ tour. But the DM connections didn’t end there for Odile was Martin Gore’s girlfriend during this period, having met at a DM show after they signed to Mute Sonet France in 1987. She can be seen as part of the Mode entourage in the D A Pennebaker documentary ‘101’. Another great single ‘Pour Ne Pas Me Toucher’ produced by Rico Conning (best known for his ‘Blind Mix’ of DM’s ‘Strangelove’ with Daniel Miller) was issued shortly after but by 1989, VIENNA were no more. Odile Arias continued briefly as a solo artist, releasing ‘Reste Avec Moi’ in 1990.

(...)

Do you think your close relationship with DEPECHE MODE helped or hindered you?

Neither one nor the other I think, I mean «professionally». I was very determined not to use my relationship with Martin to obtain benefits for VIENNA. That was really important to me. I didn’t feel like boasting or using this nice feeling so as to promote myself or my band and become more famous through it.

For example, I never took any pictures of me with Martin… which I regret now, of course, so if anyone still has any of these, I would certainly be very happy to see them and of course have them! :) Rather hard to believe in the Facebook world!

But on the other hand, it certainly helped me in my musical and personal development. Martin encouraged me a lot to go on and keep working on my own music. With the greatest simplicity and humility, he introduced me to his own way of working, to different practices and approaches. I could just enter the studio while he was recording ‘Counterfeit’, his first solo album with Rico Coning, and stay with them, listen, learn…

(...)


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1989: Martin Gore's Counterfeit E.P.
« Reply #25 on: 06 June 2015 - 20:41:43 »
2015-04-30 - Rico's Reel - Martin Gore “Counterfeit e.p.

[This is Rico Conning's blog, who had co-produced Counterfeit.]

https://ricosreel.wordpress.com/2015/04/30/martin-gore-counterfeit-e-p-1988/

Martin Gore “Counterfeit e.p.” 1988

It was a pleasant surprise when Martin Gore asked for a meeting. He’d been working on some demos and bloody good they were too, all of them cover versions.

Most interesting to me were the songs he picked that were of early 80s vintage. The biggest revelation was Joe Crow’s Compulsion, a wonderful song I hadn’t previously heard. In a Manner of Speaking by Tuxedomoon was a brave choice considering the intensity of Winston Tong’s original performance. I could only stand up and applaud his choice of Smile in the Crowd by The Duritti Column. Gone was a great song by the underrated Comsat Angels. Each of these songs Martin brought something new to and made his own, of course without negating the superb originals in any way.

He also demoed three older songs: the gospel standard Motherless Child; the beautiful Never Turn Your Back On Mother Earth by genius composer Ron Mael of Sparks; and Hey Bulldog, a fab four song that I personally like a lot, but it didn’t sit all that well with the others and wasn’t completed.

So we found a loft studio by the canal, just up the road from Mute, and got to work. A lot of the recording time was spent on vocals, as I believe Martin to be a unique singer and I wanted to be sure to present his full range. Instrumentally we didn’t build much on the demos, and in retrospect maybe we should have. But for better or worse, what you’re hearing on this EP is Martin Gore with his guitar and cranky BBC computer, singing his heart out.

Martin’s nifty guitar playing was a major revelation. He’d often turn away from the cranky computer, pick up his acoustic and launch into an Everly Brothers song, or even John Denver, and I’d happily join in on harmony. I managed to record one of these jams (without my harmonies), the old Billy Joe Royal classic Down In The Boondocks (written by Joe South). We thought this was great until Fletch came down for a visit and opined “sounds like bleedin’ Dave Edmunds”, so that killed that one. Somehow though it has found its way onto YouTube.