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Author Topic: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release  (Read 70789 times)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #375 on: 03 March 2013 - 05:02:48 »
1989-xx-xx - Unknown (US) - Martin Fletch interview

Dentez has this, but needs it in better quality and with more information.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #376 on: 03 March 2013 - 05:03:00 »
1989-xx-xx - Unknown (Czechoslovakia) - Moda v trysku

[Thanks to Milik for offering to send in this scan!]


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #377 on: 03 March 2013 - 05:03:09 »
1989-xx-xx - Virgin Music - VHS Release Titles Advert

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aW20XQoPvkE

A lengthy advert found at the beginning of the Virgin VHS release of Robocop (VVD 576), advertising other Virgin Music Video releases.

Advert can be dated to around late-eighties.

This advert features the following:
Erasure
Roy Orbison
Elvis
Eurythmics
T'Pau
Madness
UB40
Jimmy Hendrix
Ozzy Osbourne
Genesis
Depeche Mode
Bob Dylan
Belinda Carlisle
ABBA
Gary Glitter

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #378 on: 03 March 2013 - 05:03:21 »
1989-xx-xx - Unknown (Hungary) - Itt a 101!

[This probably came from Depechemode.fw.hu.]



Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #379 on: 03 March 2013 - 05:03:34 »
1989-xx-xx - Советская Армия (Russia) - Depeche Mode

http://community.depmode.com/viewtopic.php?f=7&t=989&start=30





1989-xx-xx - Music Magazine (Italy) - Notes Notes Notes

[Found on eBay.]


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #380 on: 03 March 2013 - 05:03:42 »
1989-xx-xx - Télérama (France) - Depeche et Mignons

[Thanks to fatherlesschild for this scan!]


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #381 on: 03 March 2013 - 05:03:53 »
1989-xx-xx -  BONG (USA) - Vol. 1 Issue 3

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]





MODES ON THE ROAD
[From Bong USA Edition: Vol. 1, Issue 3, Summer 1989. Words: Uncredited.]

Summary: An update on the showings of the 101 film across the USA and Canada, some of which were attended by members of Depeche Mode. [618 words]


    It is always exciting when Depeche Mode come to the States for publicity, but unless you live in New York or Los Angeles, your chances of actually meeting them are one in a million. That’s why BONG is always informed of where they are, and what they are going to be doing while they are in the United States. We sincerely wish we could let you know where they are going to be before the time comes, but most of the time we don’t know when they are coming until a few days before their arrival.

    Depeche was in the United States, and Canada at the end of April. Their visit was for the purpose of making a series of public appearances to promote their new movie. If you live in Toronto, Los Angeles, Houston, or New York you should already be aware that they were in your city, and we hope you had the chance to say hello to them. If you don’t live in one of those cities, we’re sorry you missed out on all of the excitement. On the other hand, at least you have BONG to let you know what happened.

    It all began in Toronto, Canada on Friday, April 21st. Before the start of the movie, Depeche spent some time doing various interviews with local T.V. and newspaper reporters. The movie was scheduled to start at 7:00pm, but due to a mix-up in scheduling, it actually started at midnight. After the movie ended, Depeche spent a few minutes signing autographs and saying goodbye to their fans.

    The following day, Depeche flew to Los Angeles for the second and most important part of their publicity tour. They spent the remainder of the weekend relaxing and getting re-acquainted with their favourite city. On Monday, the entire day was exhausted doing interviews, photo sessions, and radio appearances. We arrived in Los Angeles on Tuesday to see the movie, and we were quite amazed at the number of people waiting outside the AMC Century 14 in Century City. By the time the band arrived, there were at least five hundred fans waiting outside. Staged behind glass doors at the front of the theatre lobby, Depeche Mode did a few interviews while anxious fans looked on. Later, they quietly slipped away to avoid crazed fans while the people were led into the theatre. There were three theatres in the AMC Century 14 theatre that showed the movie, but only a selected number of K-ROQ (K-Rock) radio winners were admitted into the theatre where the band was. After the movie was over, Depeche signed a few records, and said goodbye to all the people who came out to see the show. After things calmed down, Depeche dashed off to a private party where they had a chance to relax and enjoy their final night in Los Angeles.

    On Wednesday the 27th, Martin and Andy went to Houston, while Dave and Alan went to New York for the third and final leg of their publicity tour. The premier in Houston was held at the AMC Meyer Park 14. It was similar to the premier in Los Angeles, and attracted almost the same size crowd. The New York premier was much more restricted, limited to special invites only.

    Los Angeles and Houston were the first two cities where the public could see the movie. The New York and Toronto shows were only special media screenings. The movie is currently scheduled to open in July. The movie will appear in San Diego, San Francisco, Seattle, Detroit, Boston, New York, Salt Lake City, Montreal, and Toronto sometime in July. Don’t give up on seeing the movie, be patient; it will be arriving soon.





REVIEWS
[From Bong USA Edition: Vol. 1, Issue 3, Summer 1989. Words: Sandy Adzgery.]

Summary: Reprint of an interview of Martin, originally taken from a US newspaper and discussing the idea and planning behind the release of the 101 film. [1775 words]


    The following article originally appeared in the April 26, 1989 edition of the Houston Post. It was written by a freelance writer, Sandy Adzgery as an exclusive Houston Post interview with Martin Gore.

    On June 18, 1988, Depeche Mode played for its largest audience ever – 70,000 screaming fans at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif. That concert, No. 101 of a nine-month stint on the road, not only concluded the group’s tour, it served as the focal point of the feature film Depeche Mode 101, which opens nationally at Houston’s AMC Meyer Park 14 on Friday.

    Filmed by D. A. Pennebaker, known for his musical documentary on Bob Dylan (Don’t Look Back, 1965) as well as 1969’s Monterey Pop, 101 follows the band and the crew across the country while simultaneously recording the adventures of a busload of Depeche fans travelling from New York to the concert in Los Angeles.

    Besides the concert footage that is approximately half of the film, the group is seen in less formal situations – talking, joking with each other and just relaxing. Martin Gore, chief songwriter for Depeche Mode, said he believes that is one of the most important aspects of the film.

    “In our nine year career, our lighthearted side has never come across for some reason,” Gore said from a London studio where the group is preparing to record its 10th album. “I think we are taken too seriously, so I think it’s good to show us in a more natural way. People always thing that we walk around not smiling and are dead serious all the time, but that just isn’t true.

    “I think it’s interesting, because it shows how trivial things are – the whole process of touring. It isn’t very deep; there aren’t any bits where we sit down and try to give philosophies on our music. Most of the time, it is very lighthearted.”

    Because of scheduling problems, only Gore and Andy Fletcher will attend the private Houston premiere on Thursday. After its opening, the film will show exclusively Fridays through Sundays for two consecutive weekends before travelling to another city. Much like a concert event, the market-by-market distribution is an unusual move, but Gore said that throughout the project they kept trying to come up with offbeat ideas to avoid the trappings of the average concert film.

    “We feel that we should try to do something a bit different,” Gore said. “Just to film a straight concert – it’s really boring, and most concert films have very little appeal to the average person. We thought we’d bring in a few different angles, and that’s why we brought in Pennebaker. You have to accept that you are never going to capture the atmosphere of a live concert on film, but you can have a good attempt. I think the live footage is quite good – he managed to capture the excitement.

    “We thought we’d have a different perspective on the project,” Gore said of their choice of Pennebaker. “A lot of filmmakers have sort of standard things that they feel they need to put in every film they do, and we didn’t want that.”

    Likewise, there were certain things that the band didn’t want in the film. “We went over to New York a couple of times when the film was nearing its completion,” Gore said. “We sat through it, and there were certain things that we didn’t really like, and we discussed that with him. He did take our opinions quite seriously, and took a couple of things out.

    “When you make this sort of film,” Gore continued, “you have to use Spinal Tap as a reference point, and there are certain times when you have to say, ‘That’s a bit too Spinal Tap.’ We said that a few times, and he listened to us.”

    Gore said the film Spinal Tap was a very accurate portrayal of a band on the road – the groupies following from town to town, the drinking, the partying, and the band members forgetting the lyrics. Even if those things do happen, Gore said, there are still some things better left unsaid. “It’s just a bit too rock and roll,” he said. “They shouldn’t be there.” [1]

    Gore stressed that the scenes that were removed were inconsequential, and that the film maintained its integrity despite the editing. “The film is quite honest, but I don’t think you have to labour home points. There are still some things that I think shouldn’t be in there. But if I really didn’t want them in there, I don’t really want to call attention to them now.”

    After nine months on the road, the last concert, 101, should have been a relief, but Gore admitted that the filming before 70,000 people caused a major case of jitters.

    “After you’ve played 100 concerts, and you’re used to going out in front of people – it’s bad to say but you get sort of blasé going out and doing the same thing night after night. But the fact that we were filming and recording the whole thing did make it scary, and we were really, really nervous before we went out onstage.

    “I suppose I would have to admit that there would have been that added edge anyway, because 70,000 is quite a bit more than we’re used to, but the fact that we were filming made us much more nervous.”

    Gore was pleased that moment was captured by Pennebaker’s camera. “There’s a good bit in the film, where we go onstage and Pennebaker is filming me and Dave from the back and we look totally nervous! Dave is actually laughing, but I’m looking so nervous.” Laughing, he said that wasn’t one of the parts he wanted to have removed. “Definitely not. I think that’s quite good.”

    Despite the growth of its audience, Depeche Mode still finds it cult status intact. Although they sell millions of albums worldwide, they aren’t seen as a major money-making industry like Bon Jovi or Van Halen. It could be because they still manage themselves and make group decisions by a vote of the four members. They don’t even have a standard recording contract with their record company.

    “We haven’t got a contract as such,” Gore said. “We didn’t have a contract at all up until two years ago when it was pointed out that if Danel (Miller, the group’s British record company president) snuffed it, we might not be paid. There was nothing in writing that said how much we should be paid. So now I think we have one sheet of paper that says the percentages that we should be paid.”

    Because of that, Depeche Mode is seen as a group truly in charge of its own destiny. Their fans believe they haven’t sold out, and still see the group as their own little secret.

    “We definitely get a lot of radio feedback like that,” Gore said. “They want us to be played on the radio, just not the biggest stations in town. We hear a lot of the anti-top 40 thing and people saying, ‘Don’t sell out.’ It’s strange that we’re seen as a cult band – the last album and tour – we sold a lot of albums and tickets, but we still have this cult image. It’s really strange, but it’s healthy. I think it’s the best position to be in.”

    Depeche Mode began making headlines last year when they announced that the “Concert For The Masses” recorded at the Pasadena Rose Bowl was going to be released as a live album. Then, on March 14th, 1989, the concert was released as a double LP, CD, and cassette. The album was titled 101, because the Concert For The Masses was the 101st show in their nine month world tour.

    For the people who actually attended the event, 101 will no doubt arouse a feeling of excitement. Just the fact that you were there, singing along with 65,000 other people is enough to make anyone get up and “Shake The Disease”. If you’re one of those who didn’t have the opportunity to attend the concert in Pasadena, 101 is still a great album. The unique sounds and added patterns in the songs bring back that sense of enjoyment that may have been lost several listenings ago. People Are People, Stripped and Pleasure, Little Treasure are among the most energetic songs on the album, and we think you’ll agree that Martin’s vocals on Somebody and A Question Of Lust are by far better than any studio recordings. There are probably a million reasons why 101 is so spectacular, but it is the audience that really puts 101 in the spotlight. Everything Counts, Strangelove, and Never Let Me Down Again are perfect examples. When you have that many people singing and cheering, you tend to experience a sense of revelation.

    However, 101 does have its downfalls. For starters, some of the songs on the album have been re-arranged so that Everything Counts is the last song. It would have been better to hear the entire concert in its original form. Second, the songs Sacred and A Question Of Lust are not included on the LP. Only the CD and cassette versions of 101 have these tracks. The only advantage of the LP is the full size, sixteen page picture book. It does come with the CD, but it’s much smaller.

    Overall, 101 is a complete success. It’s got very good reviews in almost all of the newspapers and magazines here in the U.S. . The European reviews were not quite as good, since 101 is an American concert. We highly recommend that if you want to put some new energy into your Depeche Mode listening habits, purchase 101. You might want to buy both the CD and the album, simply because there is talk that vinyl is going to be phased out soon. 101 is also the Mode’s first U.S. gatefold. 101 keeps.

    For further information about 101 and D. A. Pennebaker, please read:

“You can’t stop the beating of a human heart” by Ted Drozdowski. Musician. October, 1988.

“Modus Operandum” by John McCready. The Face. February, 1989. [2]

Interview with D. A. Pennebaker by Lauren Swift. Rock And Reel. March, 1989.

“International rock sensation Depeche Mode speaks out on music and film” by Rob Winfield. Daily Bruin. April 27, 1989.

“101 uncovers essence of Depeche Mode music” by Rob Winfield. Daily Bruin. April 28, 1989.

“Depeche Mode Film Strives To Beat Rockumentary Jinx” by Kevin Zimmerman. Variety. May 24-30, 1989.

“D. A. Pennebaker” by Jim Farber. Tower Video Collector. June, 1989.

“On Tour With The Synth-Pop Cyborgs” by Jim Farber. Rolling Stone, May 18th, 1989.

[1] - This is Martin being as discreet and oblique as ever. Without wanting to be cynical or take an unhealthy interest, the fact remains that Dave's drug use was beginning on this tour. Alan Wilder commented in Steve Malins' biography that during a game of cricket with OMD (two other things not glimpsed in 101!), "there's Dave on the tourbus, sitting under this big hat, and someone said, "You're in next Dave", and he hoovers back this massive line of coke and strolls out. Of course he lasted one ball." It isn't stretching credibility either to wonder if Martin's drinking achievements were a sight for sore eyes on this tour. But then again Martin does certainly have a point. Some things, true or not, are better kept decorously off film. [continue]

[2] - You can read this article here. I'm still eager to track down any of the others, so if any readers of this page can help me here, I'd love to hear from you. [continue]








COLLECTORS' CORNER
[From Bong USA Edition: Vol. 1, Issue 3, Summer 1989. Words: Uncredited.]

Summary: Details of the various formats that 101 and Everything Counts (Live) were released on, intended for collectors building a complete set of releases. [825 words]


    Before we give you the run down on what’s new in the collector’s market, BONG would like to help you build your bootleg library. All you have to do is send us a copy of one of your bootlegs, and we’ll send you one of ours. Please include a list of the bootlegs you already have, so we don’t send you a duplicate. If you would like a copy of a bootleg that we have already reviewed in the collector’s corner, please specify which one you want. Send them to the same address in care of bootleg trade.

    If you haven’t already purchased a copy of 101 on CD and are thinking of doing so, hold off until you can find the Japanese copy. This CD is hot. Not only do you get the two CDs in one convenient jewel case with the sixteen page picture book, but you also get two extra books. The first book contains a story (in Japanese) about the “Concert For The Masses” plus the lyrics to all of the songs in both English and Japanese. The second books contains some personal facts about each of the members that includes hair colour, eye colour, height, weight, collar size (just in case you wanted to buy them each fitted shirts), parents’ names, birth place, and birth date. In addition to this is a very in-depth history about Depeche Mode complete with very nice colour pictures from the two concerts in Tokyo. The set retails for about $30.00, but it is worth it.

    A new collection of interviews from 1983 and 1985 were imported into the States sometime in April. The interviews have been released on a picture disc limited to 3000 copies, a red coloured vinyl limited to 1000 copies, a green streaky vinyl limited to 200 copies, a 5” silver CD limited to 200 copies, and a 5” gold CD in a numbered box with two colour photos limited to 1000 copies. The sound quality on the vinyl is okay, but it’s still typical of most interviews. Your best deal is to purchase one of the CDs, they are a little clearer. Each format contains two interviews in English and one in French, with a total running time of 35 minutes and 16 seconds.

    Our friends at Mute have released Everything Counts from the new album 101. The live version from the Rose Bowl is available on the import 12” (12BONG16) along with the tracks Nothing, Sacred, and A Question Of Lust. The 7” (7BONG16) contains live versions of Everything Counts and Nothing. The limited edition 12” (L12BONG16) contains a remix of Everything Counts set to the beat of Pump Up The Volume with the U.S. remixes of Strangelove and Nothing. To finish up the vinyl formats, a limited edition numbered 10” (10BONG16) contains a very modern remix of Everything Counts called the Absolute Mix. The original 12” mix of Everything Counts from 1983 and the US 7” mix of Nothing are on the B side. The live 12” is available on a 3” CD single (CDBONG16). If you really like CDs, the live 12” and the limited edition 12” are available together in a limited edition double 3” CD set (LCDBONG16). Sire Records has also released Everything Counts plus the two new remixes. Wow! Now that’s marketing.

    Mute Records has also re-released the albums Black Celebration, Some Great Reward, Construction Time Again and A Broken frame with bonus tracks! If you have all the maxi CDs, and all the albums on CD, don’t bother to get the new CD releases for the bonus tracks. You already have them on CD. We highly recommend this investment. They should be available at a CD outlet that carries a good selection of import CDs. But if you can’t seem to find them, drop us a line and we’ll see what we can do for you.

    To finish up this edition of the collector’s corner, we rummaged through the vault here at BONG and found a few old rarities that you might not know about. The first is a US promo 12” of Blasphemous Rumours. The cover of this single is out of this world. All we can say is, it’s very un-Depeche Mode. It contains an edit version of Blasphemous Rumours, but it’s really no different from the original. Second is a Warner Brothers promo of Depeche Mode live from Switzerland on November 30, 1984. This five-cut promo with Aztec Camera on the other side contains the tracks People Are People, Blasphemous Rumours, Master And Servant, Everything Counts, and Just Can’t Get Enough. Master And Servant can also be found on the limited edition 12” of Shake The Disease (L12BONG8) and People Are People can be found on side two of the A Question Of Lust 12” (12BONG11).

    In our next issue, we will feature a complete discography of the German 12” coloured vinyls, plus much more. Until next time, happy collecting!

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #382 on: 03 March 2013 - 05:04:12 »
1989-xx-xx - Le Soir (Belgium) - Hit Parade Depeche Mode le Total!

[Thanks to ericdm for scanning this article for this forum!]





1989-xx-xx - NME (UK) - We Are The 'Modes

[Thanks to meldepeche of depecheuk.co.uk for taking a photo of this article!]





1989-xx-xx - Q Magazine (UK) - Candid Camera

[Thanks to meldepeche of depecheuk.co.uk for taking a photo of this article!]





1989-xx-xx - Sounds (UK) - 101 Film Review

[Thanks to meldepeche of depecheuk.co.uk for taking a photo of this article!]





1989-xx-xx - Sounds (UK) - 101 Film/CD

[Thanks to meldepeche of depecheuk.co.uk for taking a photo of this article!]


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #383 on: 03 March 2013 - 05:04:23 »
1989-xx-xx - Diario La Tercera (Chile) - 101 Review

http://members.fortunecity.com/martsdrink/dmode/101latercera.html

101
Depeche Mode
CNR
(1989) 105.2 m.
 
Este álbum es obligado para todos los fanáticos del grupo inglés Depeche Mode y, más aún, para los que valoran la buena música y el vanguardismo. "101" es el resultado de grabaciones en vivo realizadas durante giras a Estados Unidos; especialmente en el estadio Pasadena Rose Bowl, frente  a un público de 75.000 personas a fines de los '80. En total son 20 canciones con un fuerte sonido industrial que se adelantó a su tiempo y que les permite seguir vigentes. Están separadas en dos discos con un impresionante sonido y despliegue- recordemos que también hay un documental de estos conciertos. Es un trabajo genial y que supera lo meramente musical.
 
Tomado de Diario La Tercera, Chile, s/f.



1989-xx-xx - Insight magazine (UK) - Warts & All

[Thanks to Marblehead Johnson for scanning this for this forum!]


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #384 on: 11 March 2013 - 07:05:42 »
1991-01-xx - Sound Magazine (Russia) - 101

[Found on eBay.com.]



[Thanks to GolemsFairytale for making this transcript for this forum.]

И ТЕХНИКА, И ДУША
Основной инструмент поп-музыки -- гитара -- отнюдь не является лидирующим в звучании групп "техно-поп". Это направление ведёт свою родословную от электронных конструкций знаменитых западногерманских групп "Тэйнжирин Дрим" (Tangerine Dream) и "Крафтверк" (Kraftwerk), особенно известных в семидесятые годы. Их музыканты сделали упор на синтезаторы, и сложная техника использовались ими как символ новой электронной эры, превращающий наш мир в подобие царства роботов, и бесстрастное звучание лишь подчёркивало холодность лишённой чувств, перегруженной техникой цивилизации, одиночество затерявшегося в ней людей.
Но восьмидесятые -- время более радостное, весёлое и оптимистическое в западной поп-культуре. Такие группы, как "Софт Селл" (Soft Cell) или "Шпандау Баллет" (Spandau Ballet), стали использовать сложную технологию и прежние находки как средства создания новой поп-музыки, близкой "старой" эстраде своей сентиментальностью, романтизмом и чувственностью. Правда, пионеры направления быстро растворились в джунглях шоу-бизнеса, но не их быстрое исчезновение не было причиной быстрого взлета группы "Депеш Мод" (Depeche Mode), ставшей лидером в стиле "техно-поп".
В основе названия коллектива -- популярный французский журнал мод. Именно так решили подчеркнуть свою приверженность к красоте школьные друзья Мартин Гор, Энди Флетчер и Винс Кларк (он стал вначале лидером группы и основным поставщиком мелодий). Чуть позже они нашли зажигательного вокалиста Дэйва Гэхана (Гаана) и состав квартета определился окончательно. Начав как обычный поп-состав, четверка быстро отложила в сторону гитары и практически полностью переключилась на синтезаторы, записав свой первый сингл "Мечтай обо мне" (Dreaming of Me) и альбом "Говори и произноси" (Speak&Spell). Практически все песни сочинил Винс Кларк, который вскоре покинул "Депеш Мод", и его весьма успешно заменил Мартин Гор, который с этого момента сочиняет большинство песен для репертуара "Депеш Мод" (кстати, он недавно выпустил первый, на мой взгляд, очень удачный, сольный альбом).
Уже в следующем, 1982 году новый сингл группы "Вижу тебя" (See you) занял ещё более высокую позицию в британских чартах и принёс группе всеевропейскую известность. В это же  время окончательно стабилизировался состав "Депеш Мод". Кларка сменил Алан Уайльдер (Уайлдер), и группа продолжила своё восхождение -- очередной хит "Давай, держи баланс" (Get the Balance Right) (1983 год) был первой известной песней, которую музыканты записали в таком составе. За ней последовали "Значение любви" (Meaning of Love) и "Люби самого себя" (Love is Itself). Удачей стали и сингл под названием "Люди есть люди" (People are People), и боевик следующего года "Это называется сердцем" (It's Called a Heart).
Но поистине феноменальными удачами стали для "Депеш Мод" два вышедших следом друг за другом альбома "Черный юбилей" (Black Celebration) и "Музыка для Масс" (Music for the Masses). Признаюсь, что к числу моих самых любимых принадлежат такие песни  из этих альбомов, как " Вопрос времени" (Question of Time), "Странная любовь" (Strangelove), "Не позволяй мне больше опускаться вниз" (Never Let Me Down Again). В 1989 году в продаже появился концертный альбом "Депеш Мод 101" (101), составленный на основе записей, сделанных во время американского турне группы.
Этот альбом особенно рельефно демонстрирует достоинства музыки четырех английских артистов: живые, лишенные механической заданности мелодии, использование электроники совсем не вредит теплоте и задумчивости музыкального материала, а большинство песен вполне подойдет для любителей потанцевать.
Много это или мало? Конечно, некоторым нашим слушателям, воспитанным на традициях социального рока, трудно отойти от привычки рассматривать творчество того или иного коллектива под углом политической направленности текстов. "Депеш Мод" подобной тематикой не увлекается, ее песни больше обращены к внутреннему миру человека, но это не просто конвейерное воспроизведение привычных музыкальных и текстовых клише. По мнению моей коллеги из Мюнхена Юлии Эденхофер, группа "стала лучшим образцом английского "техно-попа", создателем музыки, в которой всегда есть оригинальность, интеллигентность и талант". Такова точка зрения восторженной поклонницы "Депеш Мод", но мне кажется, что такие оценки по отношению к четырем музыкантам вполне справедливы...
Недавно группа записала новую песню с игривым названием "Персональный Иисус" (Personal Jesus), которая попала в хит-парады многих стран. Поэтому давайте не будем дискутировать, а просто послушаем песни "Депеш Мод", тем более что музыканты дают слушателям расслабиться -- на подходе очередной альбом.
                                                                                                                ВИКТОР ГЛАЗОВ



2006-04-03 - Mute - Music For The Masses remaster

Documentary: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MzX_Wse_ro

Sleeve notes [scanned by me]:


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #385 on: 19 March 2013 - 04:24:32 »
2008-03-06 - Spiegel (Germany) - DER SOUND DER ANDEREN DEPECHE MODE IN DER DDR



http://einestages.spiegel.de/external/ShowTopicAlbumBackground/a1533/l0/l0/F.html#featuredEntry

DEPECHE MODE IN DER DDR
DER SOUND DER ANDEREN

Dieses Popkonzert schrieb Geschichte: Vor 20 Jahren spielte Depeche Mode eine eigene Show für die FDJ in Ost-Berlin. Fans boten Unsummen für Tickets, manche fälschten sie sogar. Sascha Schmidt hat Zeitzeugen aufgespürt, die damals dabei waren - und Fotos gemacht haben.

Der 7. März 1988 ist ein kalter Tag in Ost-Berlin. Doch auch der leichte Schneefall kann mehrere tausend schwarz gekleidete Jugendliche nicht davon abhalten, sich vor der Werner-Seelenbinder-Halle am Prenzlauer Berg zu versammeln. Eine Eintrittskarte für die Veranstaltung, die hier am Abend stattfinden soll, besitzen nur die wenigsten von ihnen. "Geburtstagskonzert der FDJ" steht in schlichter Schrift auf dem braunen Papier, Preis: 15 Ostmark. Ein weiterer Hinweis auf das Programm findet sich nicht. Trotzdem bieten die frierenden Fans Fantasiepreise, um in die Halle zu gelangen.

Auch ohne offizielle Ankündigungen hat sich das Gerücht bis in den letzten Winkel der Republik verbreitet: Depeche Mode würden an diesem Abend ihr erstes und einziges Konzert in der DDR spielen. Eine Sensation, nicht nur für die zahlreichen ostdeutschen New-Wave-Anhänger. "Ich konnte das nicht glauben. Die Ungarn, die bekamen so was vielleicht hin, das war ja schon halber Westen", erinnert sich Sascha Lange, Autor des Buches "DJ Westradio", der damals dabei war. "Aber die FDJ - niemals!"

Popkultureller Ausnahmezustand

Fanliebe in der DDR - das war in den meisten Fällen eine Fernbeziehung. Die Objekte der Begierde strahlten in West-Shows vom Fernsehbildschirm oder aus eingeschmuggelten Bravo-Heften, von denen jeder Schnipsel ein kleines Heiligtum war. "Ich hatte eine Oma im Westen und besaß deshalb 80 Poster von Depeche Mode", berichtet Lange über seine Jugend in der DDR.

Rocco Ganzert gehörte zu den Leipziger Depeche-Mode-Fans der ersten Stunde. Mit Sitzblockaden auf der Tanzfläche brachten er und seine Freunde die DJ's in Jugendclubs dazu, ihre vorher mühsam zurechtgespulten Kassetten abzuspielen. Als er von dem Konzert in Ost-Berlin erfuhr, war ihm klar: Er musste dabei sein. Zwar wurden die Tickets ausschließlich an Berliner Schulen verteilt, doch für 650 Ostmark - immerhin zwei Monatsgehälter - gelang es dem jungen Gebäudereiniger, vor der Konzerthalle eine Karte zu erstehen. Andere bezahlten sogar das Doppelte. "Am nächsten Tag hörten wir, dass ein Fan sogar sein Motorrad gegen eine Eintrittskarte getauscht hatte", erinnert sich Gerald Ponesky, der als Produktionsleiter für die Abläufe in der Halle verantwortlich war. Für einen Abend herrschte popkultureller Ausnahmezustand in der DDR.

Schon ein Jahr zuvor hatten Popkonzerte im Arbeiter- und Bauernstaat für Unruhe gesorgt. Anlässlich Berlins 750-Jahr-Feier, die in beiden Teilen der Stadt zelebriert wurde, wollte die DDR sich im besten Licht präsentieren. "Da brach der totale Klassenkampf aus", erzählt Ponesky. "Die wollten dem Westen den Finger zeigen." Doch auf die Ost-Jugend übten vor allem die Veranstaltungen jenseits der Mauer eine magische Anziehungskraft aus. Bei einem Open-Air-Konzert mit David Bowie und Genesis beim Reichstag direkt an der Mauer eskalierte die Situation: Der Wind wehte die Songs bis weit nach Ost-Berlin, und immer mehr Jugendliche versammelten sich auf der Straße Unter den Linden, um ihren Idolen wenigstens akustisch nah zu sein. Als die Rufe nach Perestroika und Glasnost aus der Menge heraus immer lauter wurden, schlug die Volkspolizei zu und nahm zahlreiche Personen fest. Erinnerungen an den Volksaufstand am 17. Juni 1953 wurden wach.

Merchandising - das war der Souvenirstand

Ein Damm war gebrochen. Die DDR-Funktionäre spürten immer deutlicher, dass sich immer größere Teile der Bevölkerung von ihnen anwandten und Jugendbewegungen wie HipHop und New Wave durch keine Mauer aufzuhalten waren. Die "Wunderwaffe Westkonzert" sollte deshalb dabei helfen, verlorenes Prestige zurückzugewinnen. Zwar hatten schon Künstler wie James Brown und Uriah Heep im Osten gastiert - doch Depeche Mode spielten in einer anderen Liga. Mit elektronischen Sounds und unnahbarer Attitüde galten die vier britischen Musiker um Sänger Dave Gahan nicht nur für DDR-Teenager als Inbegriff von Coolness. Ein ungarischer Konzertveranstalter fädelte den Deal ein, und die gerade mal 5000 Westmark Gage für die Band erschienen selbst den devisenklammen Genossen als Schnäppchen. Am Ende sollte der - wohl einkalkulierte - geschäftliche Verlust der Band bei über 100.000 Westmark liegen. Zahlen, die den FDJ-Coup nur noch verblüffender machen.

"Das Konzert kam wie aus dem Nichts," erinnert sich Ponesky. "Zum Glück war es nicht unser erstes. Ein paar Begriffe wie Backstage oder Catering hatten wir schon gelernt. Merchandising - das war bei uns in der DDR eigentlich der Souvenirstand!"

Andere sind weniger vertraut mit den Regeln im Musikgeschäft. Ohne Probleme gelingt es Zeitzeuge Rocco Ganzert, mit seinem Kassettenrekorder in die Halle zu gelangen. Dass es verboten sei, Konzerte mitzuschneiden, hat er zuvor in der Bravo gelesen. Doch bis zu den FDJ-Ordnern ist diese Information wohl nicht durchgedrungen.

"Dieses Glück, diese Freude"

In der Halle warten 6000 Fans. Seinen vorsorglich mitgenommenen FDJ-Ausweis kann der 16-jährige Sascha Lange stecken lassen: Nichts deutet auf eine Geburtstagsparty der FDJ hin. Statt blauer Hemden fiebern schwarz gekleidete Depeche-Mode-Doubles dem Auftritt entgegen. Die DDR ist an diesem Abend unendlich weit weg. In Grund und Boden gebuht, verlässt die ostdeutsche Vorband Mixed Pickles die Bühne.

Um 20.08 Uhr ist es endlich so weit: Als Sänger Dave Gahan "Good evening, East Berlin" in den Saal ruft, drückt Rocco Ganzert aufgeregt die Aufnahmetaste seines Kassettenrekorders. Nicht wenigen Fans laufen Tränen über das Gesicht. "Wir rasteten total aus", erinnert sich Sascha Lange. "Dieses Glück, diese Freude. Depeche Mode in der DDR - und ich war dabei!" Selbst Produktionsleiter Ponesky reißt die Stimmung mit: "Es war ein Konzert, das sich mit keinem anderen vergleichen lässt. Die Band hatte eine Aura, die einen fast gläubig werden ließ." Als nach eineinhalb Stunden das Saallicht angeht, spüren alle Beteiligten, dass sie gerade etwas ganz Besonderes erlebt haben.

Rockkonzerte als "massenpolitische Arbeit"

Auf dem Bahnhof Lichtenberg trifft Sascha Lange auf Rocco Ganzert. Wie als Beweis, dass dies nicht nur ein Traum war, hören sie auf der Rückfahrt nach Leipzig immer wieder den scheppernden Konzertmitschnitt. Und auch für Gerald Ponesky hat der Abend im Rückblick etwas Unwirkliches: "Es kam einem so vor, als wären Außerirdische für 90 Minuten gelandet, um dann wieder zu verschwinden. Und alle standen da und fragten sich, ob das wirklich stattgefunden hat."

Solche Zweifel sind der FDJ-Führung dagegen fremd. Sie verbucht "ihr" real existierendes Geburtstagskonzert als vollen Erfolg: "Rockkonzerte mit Zehntausenden von Zuschauern haben sich als wirksame Form der massenpolitischen Arbeit der FDJ unter der Jugend bewährt", lautet die optimistische Einschätzung in einem Zentralratsbeschluss vom 28. Juni 1988.

Doch die Wirklichkeit sollte die Funktionäre bald einholen. Als Depeche Mode das nächste Mal ihre Tourkoffer in Berlin auspackten, war die DDR bereits Geschichte.

Eingereicht von: Sascha Schmidt

Translation: http://www.spiffy-entertainment.com/forums2/viewtopic.php?p=105894

This pop concert has written history: 20 years ago, Depeche Mode played a secret show for the Free German Youth in East Berlin. Fans has bidden enormous amounts of money for tickets, some had even forged them. Sascha Schmidt has traced contemporary witnesses which were there - and pictures of this concert.

The 7th of March 1988 is a cold day in East Berlin. But even the light snow couldn't hold back thousands of black-dressed juveniles to gather in front of the Werner-Seelenbinder-hall at the Prenzlauer Berg. Only a minority is actually holding a ticket for this event. "Birthday Concert of the Free German Youth" is printed in plain letters on brown paper, price: 15 East German marks. There are no more notices on the program. But nonetheless, thousands of freezing fans are offering fancy prices to get into the hall.

Even without official notifications the rumour had spreaded all across the nation: Depeche Mode would play their first and only concert in the GDR. A sensation, not only for the amounts of East german New Wave fans. "I couldn't believe it. The Hungarians were probably able to pull such a stunt, since Hungary was halfway West" Sascha Lange, author of "DJ Westradio" is recalling his memories, "but the Free German Youth - never!"

Pop Cultural State of Emergency

Fan love in the GDR - in most cases, it remained a distant relationship. The objects of desire beamed from the tubes of Western TV or smuggled Bravo magazines, which were sanctuaries for each snippet. "I had a grandmother in West Germany, therefore I owned 80 posters of Depeche Mode" Lange is reporting about his youth in the GDR.

Rocco Ganzert belonged to the pioneering Depeche Mode-fans of Leipzig. With sitting blockades on the dancefloor, he and his friends made them DJs in the youth clubs playing their cumbrous on the point wound tapes. When he got wind of the East Berlin concert, it was clear for him: he had to be there. Though the tickets were exclusively given avay at schools in Berlin, the young building cleaner was able to get one ticket - for 650 East German marks, which was representing the wage of two months - in front of the hall. Others paid the double amount. "Next day, we heard of some fan swapping his motorcycle for a ticket" Gerald Ponesky, who was responsible for the operational sequences in the hall as the executive producer, is remembering. For one night, a pop cultural state of emergency ruled the GDR.

One year ago, pop concerts being held in the socialist workers' and farmers' state caused some agitation. On the occasion of celebrating 750 years of Berlin the GDR wanted to present itself in the best. "This was when the total class struggle broke out", Ponesky tells. "They wanted to flip the bird at the West". But the youth of the East were magically attracted by the events beyond the wall. During a concert featuring David Bowie and Genesis right beside the Reichstag building the situation escalated: the wind carried the songs far into East berlin, and more and more juveniles gathered at the street "Unter den Linden" to be close to their idols, at least acoustically. When the calls for "Perestroika" and "Glasnost" became louder and louder, the Volkspolizei striked back, arresting a number of people. Reminiscents of the 17th of June 1953 when the people of East Germany had risen against the administratorship of the GDR were awaken.

Merchandising - that was the souvenir stand

A dam broke. The functionaries of the GDR felt more and more that a growing part of the citizens were turning away from them and that no wall could hold back youth movements like HipHop and New Wave. The "wonder weapon West concert" was supposed to help regaining lost prestige. Indeed, artists like James Brown and Uriah Heep hald already guested East Germany - but Depeche Mode played in a different league. Wth electronic sounds and an inapproachable attitude, the British musiicans around singer Dave Gahan were not only for the teenagers of the GDR a term of coolness. A Hungarian promoter had threaded the deal, and the 5000 Westmarks salary for the band seemed like a bargain for the comrades which were always short on foreign currency. At the end, the - well calculated - business loss for the band was said to be over 100,000 Westmarks. Numbers which made the Free German Youth-coup even more spectatcular.

"The concert came out of the blue sky," Ponesky recalls. "Fortunately, it was not our first one. We had already learned a few terms like "backstage" or "catering". Merchandising - for us in the GDR, it was actually our souvenir stand!"

Others were less versed in the rules of the business. Without any problems, contemporary witness Rocco Ganzert manages to smuggle his tape recorder into the hall. It's forbidden to make recordings of concerts, that's what he had read in the Bravo before. But obviously, this information had never reached the stewarts of the Free German Youth.

"This luck, this joy"

6,000 fans are waiting in the hall. 16-year old Sascha Lange can leave his precautionary brought Free German Youth-identity card in the pocket: nothing gives a hint on that there is a birthday party of the Free German Youth happening. Instead of blue shirts [formal wear of the Free German Youth; the translator], black dressed Depeche Mode-fans are feverishly waiting for the gig. The GDR is endlessly far away on this evening. The openers, East German band Mixed Pickles, were booed mercilessly away from the stage.

At 8:08 pm, it's finally beginning: when Dave Gahan is shouting "Good evening, East Berlin" into the hall, Rocco Ganzert is excitedly pressing the recording button of his tape recorder. Tears are running over the faces of many fans. "We went completely ballistic" Sascha Lange says. "This luck, this joy - Depeche Mode in the GDR, and I was there!" Even executive producer Ponesky was gripped by the spirit: "It was a concert which was unmatched. The band featured an aura which could made one almost a believer." When the lights went on again about 90 minutes later, all spectators knew that they had just experienced something very special.

Rock concerts as "mass political work"

At the station Lichtenberg, Sascha Lange meets Rocco Ganzert. Like an evidence that this wasn't just a dream, they are listening again to the clanking recording of the concert on their way back to Leipzig. And in the retrospection, Gerald Ponesky experienced this evening as something unreal: "It felt like extraterrestials came down for 90 minutes just to disappear again. And all stood there and asked themselves if all of this had really happened."

Such doubts are alien to the administration of the Free German Youth. They are accounting "their" real existing birthday concert as a full success: "Rock concerts with ten thousands of spectators have proved to be an effective form of mass political work of the Free German Youth among the youth" is the optimistic estimate of a resolution of the central council made on the 28th of June 1988.

But the reality catched up with the functionaries soon. When Depeche Mode unpacked their tour cases in Berlin for the next time, the GDR was already history.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #386 on: 19 March 2013 - 04:24:44 »
2009-06-xx - Spin (US) - Encore

books.google.com/books?id=dQNfU0m3UX0C&lpg=PP1&pg=PA108



Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #387 on: 19 March 2013 - 04:24:55 »
2009-11-11 - Moreintelligentlife - MY TIME WITH DEPECHE MODE IN EAST BERLIN

http://moreintelligentlife.com/blog/cornelia-rudat/my-time-depeche-mode-east-berlin

MY TIME WITH DEPECHE MODE IN EAST BERLIN
“Hi, I'm Conny Rudat. I was your interpreter at your first concert in East Berlin on March 7th in 1988.” “So I heard”, was Andrew Fletcher’s terse reply when I met him for a quick chat before Depeche Mode’s "Sounds of Universe" gig in Berlin’s Olympic Stadium over the summer. What did I expect? Did I really believe the band's bassist/keyboardist would recognise me after 21 years?

In 1987, two years before the Wall came down, East and West Berlin celebrated  the city’s 750th anniversary by engaging in a bit of cultural one-upsmanship. An unspoken competition for the most attractive events inspired the East German regime to allow Western rock bands to perform, provided they agreed to be paid in East German marks (which had to be spent locally) or in kind. So Joe Cocker bought a Meissen porcelain dinner set; John McLaughlin bought high quality Praktica SLRs made in Dresden, and others spent their marks on fine musical instruments made in the GDR.
As an interpreter and translator in East Berlin, I had a unique chance to work with British and American bands and singers from 1987 to 1990. I will never forget my first job with Shakin’ Stevens, who toured East Germany in March 1987, or my last with Mick Hucknall of Simply Red in March 1990.
Depeche Mode, a British band that has long been popular in Germany (having recorded three albums in the legendary West Berlin Hansa Studios in the early 1980s), was one of the bands that benefited from East Berlin’s modest relaxation of cultural rules. I was appointed their interpreter for a couple of hours in 1988. A photo of me with the very handsome band (pictured above), taken during a press conference, hung on my bedroom wall for years.
The band is still  incredibly popular in Germany. When they performed in Berlin this summer, I managed to arrange a brief meeting with Fletcher. (Unfortunately David Gahan, the band's singer, and Martin Gore, the songwriter and guitarist, couldn't be there.) When I showed him the photo, which includes Alan Wilder, my secret personal hero, who sadly left the band in 1995, Fletcher smiled and relaxed a bit.
Our conversation naturally turned to aging (we are all around the same age), our grown-up kids and the band's health (including Gahan's recent cancer surgery). Fletcher described the challenge of keeping fit for their marathon Tour of the Universe 2009. “No drugs anymore?” I asked. “Well”, he said, “music is a powerful drug.” Later, among a nearly hypnotised crowd of 68,000 fans, who had their arms up from the very first song until the very last, I conceded it had to be.
Standing this time on the other side of the stage, I vividly remembered how it felt to be part of the backstage crew. At the time it was just a job for me, like many others. Only much later did I appreciate the singularity of the experience. After the show, I went with the four musicians and their crew to an East Berlin discotheque. It did not take long before all four had groupies on their laps, but they still needed me to translate these exchanges. The situation soon felt awkward, however, and I decided to head home, fuming and perhaps a little jealous.
But I was very proud to be the one to see them off at the airport next morning. All four of them sweetly thanked me for my work and for looking after them so well, and kissed me good-bye. Their last kiss on East German soil was definitely mine. I was in heaven.
Depeche Mode: Tour of the Universe 2009 travels to London on December 15th and 16th and then heads back to Berlin on January 9th 2010 
~ CORNELIA RUDAT



2013-05-30 - MDR Sachsen (Germany) - Artour

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4UNG1GZHZU



2013-07-05 - MDR (Germany) - Mein Sommer '88

http://www.mdr.de/mediathek/livestreams/fernsehen/social-tv/artikel124026.html

Superstars aus dem Westen spielen in der DDR? Bis zum Frühjahr 1988 ein undenkbares Szenario. Doch plötzlich geben sich innerhalb weniger Monate die Top-Stars die Klinke in die Hand: Depeche Mode, Bryan Adams, Joe Cocker, James Brown, Bruce Springsteen und die E-Street-Band. Die Dokumentation reflektiert mit Zeitzeugen und exklusiven Konzertausschnitten diese aufregende Zeit.

http://www.mdr.de/sommer88/die-konzerte100.html

Konzertsommer der Superlative

160.000 Fans jubelten 1988 bei einem Konzert Bruce Springsteen zu. In der DDR! Das war der Höhepunkt eines Konzertsommers der Superlative, der mit Depeche Mode eingeläutet wurde. Hier gibt es alle Konzerte im Überblick.

"Geburtstagskonzert der FDJ" mit Depeche Mode

Depeche Mode - Superstars damals wie heute - spielten am 7. März 1988 in der Werner-Seelenbinder-Halle in Ost-Berlin. "Geburtstagskonzert der FDJ" stand auf den nur 6.000 Tickets, die die Besucher des Konzertes in der Hand hielten. Die britische Band, die seit ihrem internationalen Durchbruch 1984 mit "People are People" Hit um Hit in den Charts platzieren konnte, ahnte nichts von dem Motto, Karten gab es nicht im freien Verkauf, sondern wurden an Ost-Berliner Schulen an FDJ-Mitglieder verteilt. Obwohl der Name der Band nicht mal auf den Tickets stand, sickerte durch, wer da spielen sollte. Entsprechend obskure Blüten trieb der Schwarzmarkt vor dem Konzert: Tickets wurden gegen Trabis oder "Schwalben" eingetauscht. Mitglieder der Tour-Crew hatten Erbarmen und verschenkten rund 50 Tickets an besonders verzweifelte Fans, Backstage-Pass inklusive.


https://vimeo.com/69790711

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1987-1989: Music and Tour for the Masses & 101 release
« Reply #388 on: 13 March 2014 - 23:38:15 »
2014-03-13 - Electricity Club (UK) - DEPECHE MODE 101 25 Years On

http://www.electricity-club.co.uk/depeche-mode-101-25-years-on/

DEPECHE MODE 101 25 Years On : A Short Conversation with ALAN WILDER

It was the document that put DEPECHE MODE into the big league. But while ’101′ affirmed the Basildon boys’ status into Trans-Atlantic Stadium Monsters, it also symbolised the end of the synth wars… the battle of Synth Britannia had now been won but with no fight left, the journey had come to an end.

And at the post-Live Aid roundabout, DEPECHE MODE had to take a different course to survive and maintain their new found prosperity. So they got rockier and bluesy to fatten the sound for those huge venues while Dave Gahan’s stage gestures got more provocative and more physical as he had the cover the width of the stage. Even Fletch’s arms aloft gestures became a key part of the bigger show. This ultimately culminated with the pseudo-rock explosion of ‘Songs Of Faith And Devotion’ and its corresponding self-destructive tour. But all that was to come later…

Released 25 years ago in the UK on 13th March 1989, the ’101′ double album and accompanying film directed by acclaimed filmmaker D A Pennebaker was aimed squarely at telling onlookers-at-large that DEPECHE MODE were no longer those fey synthpoppers in need of a good tailor, but a band with the potential to do battle with U2, who coincidentally had their own film ‘Rattle and Hum’ out in the same year.

While a popular live draw stateside in 1988, DEPECHE MODE had only previously headlined arena sized venues on America’s two coasts. The popularity of British post-punk acts among white American teenagers thanks to the Anglophile soundtracks of John Hughes films like ‘The Breakfast Club’, ‘Pretty In Pink’ and ‘Some Kind Of Wonderful’ was at an all time high. SIMPLE MINDS had nailed a US No1 with ‘Don’t You (Forget About Me)’ from ‘The Breakfast Club’ while OMD had hit the Top5 with ‘If You Leave’ from ‘Pretty In Pink’. Indeed, Depeche’s American label Sire had attempted to relaunch them in this Hollywood centred environment by having their B-side ‘But Not Tonight’ as the theme to a largely forgotten teen movie ‘Modern Girls’. The song flopped which proved to be a blessing, especially when looking at the later career trajectories of SIMPLE MINDS and OMD following their initial post-John Hughes flushes of success…

To capitalise on the momentum of increasing US album sales of the album ‘Music For The Masses’ and their most successful American tour yet, they elected to play a ‘Concert for The Masses’ at the 70,000 capacity Pasadena Rose Bowl on 18th June 1988. The 101st and final show of their ‘Music For The Masses’ tour, it was a risky strategy at the time as the band had achieved only one Top 40 single ‘People Are People’ in the US. But the buzz around the band, especially from the listenership of the influential college friendly radio stations such as KROQ indicated that DM’s newly Devoted American fanbase would make the special trip to witness what was effectively their own musical Superbowl.

Recorded primarily around backstage antics and a road trip following a group of fans on their way to the show inter-dispersed with concert footage from various shows, it was to effectively establish DEPECHE MODE as a credible worldwide force, particularly with dissenters in the UK press who had always been resistant and cynical to their success. The result of the release of ’101′ was that even neutrals in the UK who had bought the odd album or single in the past were astonished to find synthpop classics such as ‘Everything Counts’ and ‘Just Can’t Get Enough’ were now being aired to the masses in all the world’s stadiums… at least that was the perception. Jim Kerr of SIMPLE MINDS was quite bemused at their newly acquired status, retrospectively commenting to Word Magazine in 2006: “Who would’ve thought Depeche Mode plink-plonking away would play in stadiums?”

As a profile building exercise for DEPECHE MODE, ’101′ was a big success but its legacy also had an effect on Mode’s contemporaries. Rather than opening doors, ’101′ inadvertently shut them to others. Having been Vince Clarke’s original inspiration to take up the synthesizer and eventually launch DEPECHE MODE, main support act OMD could only watch in awe as their apprentices wowed the massive crowds night after night. It must have been demoralising to McCluskey and Humphreys despite their own, not unsubstantial success in Europe. But in the rush to break America, OMD may have had a Top 5 US single to their name but they could not (and have never been able to) attract the Devoted loyalty which Messrs Gahan, Gore, Fletcher and Wilder steadily built and enjoyed. They could only go one way after this and looking back, their split in 1989 was predictable!

Supporting proceedings that night in Pasadena was THOMAS DOLBY who also had to rethink his own artistic aspirations. Despite a Top 5 US hit single to his name, he had his own struggles with pressure for more hits from his various record labels. As a solo act, he could not split with himself but after his 1992 album ‘Astronauts and Heretics’, he effectively retired from the music industry. Working in Silicon Valley on music integration software for the brave new world of the internet with great success and developing the polyphonic ringtone engine for Nokia along the way, he only returned to music in 2006; he supported DEPECHE MODE again at London’s Hyde Park that same year.

By the time of the more organic but still primarily electro album ‘Violator’, DEPECHE MODE had overtaken all their peers, and this symbolism was highlighted when they played at Dodgers Stadium in August 1990 to conclude the North American leg of the ‘World Violation’ tour. The support act were ELECTRONIC, a supergroup made up of refugees from NEW ORDER and THE SMITHS plus both PET SHOP BOYS thrown in for good measure! Messrs Gahan, Gore, Fletcher and Wilder had now become the UK independent scene’s biggest post-punk success story.

One of the protagonists at the Pasadena Rose Bowl on 18th June 1988 was of course, Alan Wilder. In an exclusive interview for its 25th Anniversary, he kindly answered some questions about ’101′ and discussed its legacy…

In hindsight, the ‘101’ film, while good for DEPECHE MODE’s profile at the time, appeared to focus on some of the wrong things ie there’s too much footage of the fans on the bus, not enough actual music?

Even though Don Pennebaker had previously made music concert films (David Bowie at Hammersmith Odeon for example), he is primarily a documentary filmmaker – which was appealing to us although it is debatable whether the pre-determined set-up of the group of bus people (collected and auditioned a la Big Brother) is not an inferior form, as opposed to entering an already existing situation and truly being a fly on the wall. After all, Reality television has little to do with reality.

Once commissioned and given a fairly free reign, Pennebaker looked at his options and decided to make a film about what he considered to be the most (perhaps the only) interesting factors of the DM phenomenon. The fact that Don had not really even heard of the group, let alone any of its music, gave him an outsider’s perspective and he soon realised that he wasn’t likely to glean any pearls of wisdom from the band members. As individuals, we were not deep-thinking angst-driven people with massive world insight. His decision to focus on the fans was probably the right one.

In its defence, it shouldn’t be forgotten that we’ve all been saturated with the kind of voyeurism that Reality TV has spewed forth into our consciousness for more than two decades, but in 1987 this was an unusual and precarious approach. Nobody knew what would transpire or whether it would be of any interest at all. I’d go as far as to say the idea was somewhat groundbreaking as it clearly pre-dates all that MTV malarky which most people consider to be where the Reality craze got started.

Also, the naivety and carefree exuberance with which the bus protagonists go about their adventures has a charm which could probably not be repeated today, given the knowing self-promoting instincts from most who take part in these ventures now, along with the predictable audience consumption, moral judgements and salacious anticipation of all things about to fall apart. This kind of format has not only become hugely popular but also the centre of heated discussions about tabloidisation, media ethics, privacy and the representation of the real.

At the time, I felt short-changed by ‘101’ as I wanted the band itself to be explored more profoundly, preferably by someone who had knowledgeable insight into the music, our working practices and what we (albeit sometimes clumsily and naively) were generally trying to do. Pennebaker didn’t pretend to understand the band at all – he made no bones about that fact – but, with hindsight, he did manage to make a piece which says something about the era and I think, allied to the fact that it holds no pretentions (unlike some rock docs of the period – err… hummm… ‘Rattle and Hum’), it stands the test of time. Having said that, I find the film at best curious rather than ‘deep’.

The fanbase connection with the band appeared to be what was trying to be highlighted on ‘101’. For example, the crowd has been mixed in very loudly on the live footage and audio whereas a good number of live albums of the time would neutralise the audience noise?

I feel to highlight the fanbase connection was fair enough. After all, this is the real crux of the DM fascination – how “four Walters from Basildon” (to quote an early single review) could form the source of nothing short of a worldwide phenomenon, the nature of which is quite perplexing, way out of proportion for a pop band – a strange, bizarre and enduring religion which has been demonstrated again more recently in Jeremy Deller’s film ‘The Posters Came From The Walls’.

Is that right about the crowd levels? I haven’t listened for a long time to the album but the film soundtrack may be even more that way. Again, I haven’t watched the film for many years and it’s possible that the Pennebaker crew had some extra control over that music-to-crowd balance. My memory though is that we controlled the music mixes and so the album balance would have been the decision of those of us who mixed the tracks.

‘101’ symbolises DEPECHE MODE’s entry to the wider international stage but perhaps also, the end of Synth Britannia as of those support acts who played that day in Pasadena, OMD split up soon after while THOMAS DOLBY retired from the music industry a few years later. It was as if DM had set a bar that their peers couldn’t hope to reach… any thoughts on that?

I’m not sure that DM’s ‘success’ would have had any negative bearing on other electronic artists. If anything, the expectation of positive reverberations and opening of doors would have been more likely. A lot of it was luck for DM though, coupled with plenty of donkey work touring in the US leading up to the big (and unexpected to such a degree) explosion. It seems the timing was right for that kind of music where genres were being choked by mainstream rock radio as a huge cult level of other music listeners were being shafted. We benefited from a kind of breaking of the dam which finally gave way, resulting in those stations almost being forced into recognising and playing the newer UK artists of the time – such as The Cure, The Smiths, New Order, DM and many other groups which had been, up until then, considered ‘alternative’ or ‘cult’ in the states. I can’t hazard a guess about the examples you cite or speculate as to why some acts may have failed to capitalise. I do know that there is never a correlation which one should assume between the quality of a band / artist compared to the amount of people who turn up to their concerts. It’s a funny old game…

With that in mind and with DEPECHE MODE established publically with ‘101’ as a ‘stadium act’, had the development into a more organic, rock / bluesy sound to suit those types of venues been a conscious move in order for DM to maintain that position with ‘Violator’ and ‘Songs Of Faith And Devotion’?

Subconsciously there may be an element due to the nature of the venues and larger (more distant) crowds needing to be serviced. Dave, I’m sure, would have welcomed the more ’rocky’ approach to release and enhance his own stage performances. But ‘Violator’ is still a very electronic album when you listen to it now, and its less electronic elements, rather than derived from stadium experiences, were mainly influenced by the wave of hip hop and rap music which permeated the scene at that time. The methods of those artists employing more left-field sampling techniques left a significant mark on both myself and Flood. We were attracted to the inherent feel of played drum loops for example rather than precisely programmed rhythm from machines or individual drum samples. This ‘looping’ was taken much further with ‘SOFAD’ of course – an album style conceived mainly because we didn’t want to just repeat ‘Violator’ despite its success. That would have been seen as stagnation and some of us at least were very wary of that.

You did not appear in the interviews or commentary for the bonus features on the ‘101’ DVD reissue, why was that?

A surprising amount of pressure was put on me to take part in the ‘director’s commentary’ idea, mainly from Daniel Miller and Pennebaker himself, but I didn’t feel I had some exciting anecdotes or anything particularly insightful to add for the reissue. I’ve never enjoyed the commentary concept – frequently empty and often unnecessarily demystifying (I like to retain something for the imagination). The ‘101’ film is not exactly complicated and doesn’t contain any technical issues which needed explaining either. It speaks for itself. Even though, on paper, the idea of a group and director ‘talkover’ maybe could have worked – i.e. jogging each other’s memories etc – I just knew that putting four rock band members together in a room to randomly comment would result in silly giggling, talking over each other and the spouting of mainly nonsense. And that filled me with dread.