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Author Topic: 1985: The Singles 81>85  (Read 44284 times)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #15 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:11:06 »
1985-04-30 - BBC (UK) - First Post

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r3Eg6l2aO2w



[I made a transcript:]

Adam Sunderland: That was a clip from Depeche Mode.
Andy: Hello.
Adam Sunderland: Now, we've got loads of question for you, and you've got a competition for us. But first, tell me what you've been doing for the last few months?
Dave: Well, we've just recently come back from Japan, where we've been touring, and in America as well, we've done a very successful tour over there. Other than that, we've just finished recording a new single, which is out now, and of course the live video which is also out now.
Adam Sunderland: What's it like in Japan?
Dave: Very odd, the people over there, the audiences are very odd, they sort of... they don't really know how to react, they haven't been taught how to react, they haven't had enough groups over there to react to, but I don't know what it is. Very strange, very quiet, you know, when you do a gig.
Andy: They're scared to offend you, aren't they?
Dave: Yeah, they think if they scream and shout at you, and join in and clap their hands, that they'll offend you, and you'll be offended by it, which is obviously totally wrong.
Adam Sunderland: [laughs] Right, then, well we've got some questions for you. And there's one from Carol Johnson from County Down in Northern Ireland, and she had 20 questions for you. So, here's one: "If you were doing a concert on the moon, what three things would you take with you?"
Dave: Eh, I suppose we need a PA, which is our sound...
Andy: Yeah, we need our lights, and we need our instruments. I mean-
Dave: -I would have to take a few other-
Andy: -we will take a few other things, like clothes and that, but... we're only allowed three.
Adam Sunderland: Aaah, right then. And there's one here from Sarah Burker of Sheffield, and she says "What's Dave's favourite drink, and hobby?"
Dave: Hobby? Me hobby is probably fishing. Drink? I don't really know, tea, I suppose.
Adam Sunderland: And Jackie Nutty of Nottingham:-
Andy: -Jackie Nutty? [laughter]
Adam Sunderland: "Why are you never featured on the sleeves of your singles and albums?"
Andy: Well, the thing is, like, we always think that pictures always date, you know, so we've always tried to keep away from that. You know, you see these pictures of bands of like 10 years ago, they really look terrible when you see them now. So we always like to keep away from the image and we like to concentrate on the music, and we try to have a cover that actually fits the mood of the album.
Adam Sunderland: Well, alright. You've got a competition for us, so, tell us about it.
Andy: Yes. Before Christmas, we recorded this live video called "The World We Live In And Live In Hamburg", and this is a clip from it. And we wanna know the title of the song, and also the album which it comes from.
Adam Sunderland: Right, so that's: identify the song and tell us which album it comes from. Here's the song.
-
Adam Sunderland: So if you know which album that song comes from, put your answer on a postcard with your name and address and send it to First Post, Granada TV, Manchester, M60 9EA, to arrive no later that Tuesday the 7th of May. The first three correct answers will each receive a VHS video recording of Depeche Mode Live In Hamburg. Now, let's have a look at Depeche Mode's new video. This is the first time on British TV.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #16 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:13:33 »

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #17 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:15:21 »
1985-04-xx - Unknown (Japan) - Interview

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jv7syWTWBp4



[I made a transcript:]

Interviewer: Your group is really unique, in the sense that you don't have any guitarists, no drummers, no bassists, just keyboards and synthesizers.
Dave: Yeah, I suppose so, I mean, we're very sort of very unconventional in that way. But basically, a lot of the sounds, a lot of the actually way in recording things, is a very similar format, you know. We still have like basslines and riffs and rhythm riffs, and stuff like that, and drums. It's just, as you said, we don't do it in the conventional way. We use electronics, which we find more interesting.
-
Martin: Well, you know, it's still a sort of very new thing. I think it's got a few years left in it yet. Conventional music is sort of starting to get boring. Most of the bands that are used to conventional formats that are coming out now, tend to sound very alike, and sort of a bit boring. I think it's the most interesting field, electronic music.
-
Dave: We find that we get fans all the time, you know. Fans that sort of liked us five years ago have now grown older with us. And they're following, based on our songwriting styles. And then I've seen some new fans coming as well who don't really know your background. They might go out and buy, say, People Are People, but they've never bought anything in the past.
Andy: When we first started, one time, we had a very quite young audience. But now in our audience you'll find equal boys and girls, older kids and young kids, it's a real good cross-section.
-
Martin: Before, you mentioned groups like Cocteau Twins, This Mortal Coil, New Order.
Dave: There's a few recently that have come out, I think. We all seem to like the Smiths quite a lot when it came out. It's one of the best groups that have come out of Britain for a while now.



1985-04-xx - Music Life (Japan) - Dave Gahan interview

[Thanks to dmplus for uploading this article!]

http://www.ebay.com/itm/DEPECHE-MODE-Dave-Gahan-STRAWBERRY-SWITCHBLADE-1985-CLIPPINGS-JAPAN-ML-4A-10PAGE-/201392984608




Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #18 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:16:08 »
1985-04-xx - TVAM (UK) - Wide Awake Club

Master And Servant: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNfAriHz0yM
Shake the Disease: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bk2yS8aY2Nk


Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #19 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:17:03 »
1985-04-xx - Depeche Mode Official Info Service Newsletter

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]



Information Service newsletters:
[1] - April 1985
            News on the release of "Shake The Disease". 

Information Service newsletter, April 1985.
Record News
    'Shake the Disease' c/w 'Flexible' is the title of the forthcoming single to be released on April 29th. Both recordings were written by Martin, and a 12" of extended versions will also be made available. There are no plans for a Ltd Edition 12". 
    'The World We Live In And Live In Hamburg' is the title of the live video recorded in Hamburg on December 9th. It will be released through 'Virgin Records' on April 18th.   
Tour News   
    There will be no further tours in Europe or America until early 1986, when a new album is planned for release. 
    A series of festivals are planned for July in Belgium, Greece, France and possibly some other places.   
Television and Radio   
    Andy and Dave will be appearing on a new show called 'First Post' on April 30th.
    Alan and Martin are due to appear on the 'Saturday Picture Show' on May 3rd.
    On May 10th the band will be appearing at the Montreux TV Special in France.
    Dave and Alan are due to present Gary Crowley's Show at 8pm on Capital Radio on May 21st.
[A "General Messages" section has been omitted from the transcript here.]
    Please send a stamped self addressed envelope at the end of April with 5/85 clearly marked in the top left hand corner for Information Sheet No. 5/85.
    Possible "Record Mirror" and "No. 1" features soon.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #20 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:18:24 »
1985-04-xx - Much Music (Canada) - Dave interview (excerpt)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2gHwlE85OXY



Dave: ...came over and Vince had only just departed from us, at the end of '81. So Martin had just started writing, and his writing at that time wasn't as strong as it is now. He just getting used to getting 10 songs, 12 songs, together for an album and stuff like that, and he had only been used to writing one or two songs a year. So it was a big move, really. And the second album after Vince left was a bit patchy, I would say.

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #21 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:19:42 »
1985-05-03 - Melody Maker (UK) - Shake the Disease Review

[Thanks to ScannedPress from scannedpress.blogspot.com for scanning this! An excerpt of this appeared in the sleeve notes of The Singles 81-85.]



DEPECHE MODE: Shake The Disease (Mute)
GOD, Depeche Mode's prosperity is dumbfounding. The brief was simple: four football hooligans as sensitive wimps make heaps of money twiddling synth-things. The brow-furrowing, hand-wringing concerned lyric! Go away, boys; I don't want your empathy. "Shake The Disease" is the usual hushed paean to all that is conceptually abstract to these simpletons.
Caroline Sullivan

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #22 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:20:00 »
1985-05-04 - BBC (UK) - The Saturday Picture Show

Alan wrote an anecdote about this in his Q&A: http://oldsite.recoil.co.uk/forum/qa/ppers3.htm
Quote
Question: So I was visiting Richard Berry's Recoil website and I saw these pictures of you from way back. It looks like you've got some kind of beard thing on your face. What's up with that?
Alan: It was a wheeze I concocted with a specific purpose in mind. And I have to say, it worked a treat. My David Bellamy-inspired appearance was designed so that it would also be my last on British Saturday morning kids TV (which I detested). Neil Ferris, DM's plugger at the time, would insist that I regularly pair up with one other band member to turf up at the BBC at the crack of dawn only to be surrounded by a gaggle of 8 year-olds while being patronised by Mike Read or some such twat. Many heated discussions occurred around this time about the wisdom of such prostitution (Smash Hits was another example) but I was always persuaded that, after watching the show, the girlies were bound to rush down to their local record shops in droves, dribbling for our latest single. When I spotted the false beard in the BBC make-up room, I seized my opportunity to get my own back on Neil and was never asked to make another appearance. Result.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJC4Z6ufV1g



[I made a transcript:]

Interviewer: ...This video, with Shake The Disease, and, in the control room, there's Martin Gore from Depeche, and eh, well, who is this character, do you know what I mean? David Bellamy? Who is it?
Alan: [Does a David Bellamy impression] Well, I've got some crazy crawling crabs-
Interviewer: [Also does a David Bellamy impression] -around here. Alan, Wilding [sic], and Martin-
Martin: -I'd like to point out to the lads and everyone we know out there: I tried to talk him out of this.
Interviewer: But he's been in make-up and he's been having a little room to round -haven't you?- a joke.
Alan: Whatcha mean?
Interviewer: Well, yeah, absolutely. Well, listen, how long have you two known each other? About?
Alan: Ohh... 4 years? 3 years. 3,5 years, something like that.
Interviewer: So you went to school together?
Martin: No.
Interviewer: But you see a lot of each other, I mean, you're constantly touring, constantly play together? Do you ever get sick of each other? Do you ever sort of start having rows?
Alan: Yeah.
Interviewer: Really?
Alan: No, we're not too bad, I mean-
Martin: -Only Fletch, Fletch gets on our nerves a lot.
Alan: Obviously, yeah.
Interviewer: Why?
Alan: He's a very irritating person.
Interviewer: Really?
Alan: No, we get on reasonably well, most of the time. Obviously when you've been on tour, in each other's pockets for a month or so, then it's, eh...
Interviewer: What do you argue about, though, I mean, what sort of thing tends to get you all going?
Alan: Totally stupid things, yeah, nothing important. All the important things we totally agree on, and all the stupid things we argue about, don't we?
Martin: [nods]
Interviewer: Yeah. You should know better. "No, we don't argue!" Now, we went to Lightwater Valley last week, a mighty film by Ireland Motion Picture in Overton Lightwater Valley, and incidentally, it's a wonderful place to go, go and have a look at the military P unit that we showed earlier on. There are loads of attractions, of course. We met some Depeche Mode fans, and appart from wanting to ask you loads of questions, they were also brave enough to have a go on the incredible Hellslide!
-
Interviewer: It is incredible! The top of it is absolutely awful. Carol said to you, "Would you have come down the Hellslide?" Well, would you have come down the Hellslide, Martin?
Martin: Yes.
Interviewer: In a word. Have you ever sort of been down? What are you like on dippers and rollercoasters and things?
Martin: Pretty good.
Interviewer: Pretty good? Nothing bothers you?
Martin: Not really.
Interviewer: What about these big dippers that go upside down? Would you fancy anything like that?
Martin: I think I've been on one before, yeah.
Interviewer: Yeah. That is the worst. Just sort of sat on top and plunging off. What about you Alan, are you fairly brave on these things?
Alan: Eh, no, not really, don't like them very much.
Interviewer: Okay. Graham asks, first of all -he was the one with the dirty yellow socks, by the way- he said "What's your other favourite popgroup?" Martin?
Martin: I think my favourite popgroup of all time is Sparks.
Interviewer: Sparks, why?
Martin: Not so much now, but their early stuff, their three albums or so, are really, really good.
Interviewer: "This town ain't big enough for the both of us..."
Martin: Well that stuff, yeah.
Interviewer: We never hear much of them, now, do we?
Martin: No, I think they've got some new stuff coming out now?
Interviewer: Really? So they're still around? What about you, Alan? Your favourite popgroup? Apart from Depeche Mode?
Alan: Ehm, ZZ Top.
Interviewer: ZZ Top, why?
Alan: Well, they're just... They're just the band, you know?
Martin: The image, the image.
Alan: Image, everything.
Interviewer: Image. Talking about image, look at the beard! I mean, just look at it, it's wonderful!
Alan: What, don't you like it?
Interviewer: I think it's great! I think it's about time you had a shave.
Alan: It's different.
Interviewer: [laughs] Anna then came down, she was the one with the Who sweater on, she said "What's you most embarrassing moment ever?" Ever ever? Martin?
Martin: [sighs] I haven't got one that actually stands out as being most embarrassing, they're all sort of equally embarrassing, and it's usually after I've had, you know, sort of a bit too much to drink. But, they're all about the same.
Interviewer: Anything that you can tell us? Anything that you can tell us?
Martin: Not really, not now.
Interviewer: Tell me later, tell me later! Alan?
Alan: Yeah, nothing that can be revealed on television, I'm sorry about that?
Interviewer: No problems on stage? I mean, like forgetting the songs, or...?
Martin: That's all on tape.
Interviewer: Oh, well yes! I mean, I was gonna say that actually, but eh...!
Alan: That's pretty embarrassing!... No, ehm, Fletch had a quite embarrassing moment. He broke his arm on the last tour, fell out of the bath... Or was it that, Fletch? I can't remember, something like that... No, he told us enough times, that's what it was.
Interviewer: You've heard the news about Spandau Ballet, of course, about Steve Norman? Doing his bit. I mean, that must be a very embarrassing thing to happen, because he apparently slid along the floor...
Alan: Well he's out of action, isn't he?
Interviewer: And he's completely out of action. He was sliding along the floor doing a sort of kneeslide, and he has wrecked his knees, so... Get well soon, Steve. Apparently they're at the end of their tour, so it's not too bad. Now the girl in the red and black checkers shirt, she came next, and she said "Who inspired you to start playing?" Who inspired you to start playing?
Martin: Gary Glitter.
Interviewer: Gary Glitter? Really? Why? Because, you were obviously quite young when you...
Martin: I just sort of really liked his songs and his image, you know. I was taken away by his image. The big eyes.
Interviewer: But it's a completely different image, I mean, you haven't got anything like that kind of image, have you? Not that very upfront, sort of image.
Martin: No. Well I don't mean I sort of want to copy him or bits, or be like that, but I was taken in by it at the time. I was about 12.
Interviewer: Yeah. He's a great performer, isn't he? Wonderful performer, and he's still around, which is great. Alan?
Alan: Ehm, I might go slightly before that glamrock period, you know... No, I think the Beatles, I would have to say them, really.
Interviewer: Yeah, Beatles. Now, how did Depeche actually get together? Tell us the story of Depeche.
Alan: Go on, Martin, you know the history.
Interviewer: Go on, Martin, you tell us.
Martin: Alright, well, we sort of got together about five years ago, and originally it was just me, Andy and Vince - Vince Clarke, who went on to form Yazoo. Then we sort of got Dave in as the singer. Started playing around locally and thing, it just... I knew Andy from school, Vince lived out my back, and Dave just lived over the other side of town, so we all sort of knew each other, roughly.
Interviewer: So what sort of places did you play? Did you actually get to play at school at all?
Martin: We did actually play at my and Andy's school, just a sort of youth club or something. We did play another youth club in Basildon, they were sort of the first two concerts that we did.
Interviewer: Do you ever go back and pay a visit to home and play, or not?
Martin: Ehm, no. It's too difficult these days, you know, getting it all together, getting the whole show together.
Interviewer: Yeah. You're so busy folks! It's wonderful. Now it's competition time again, hang around, we'll be hearing more from Martin, because they are coming down. You've had twelve charts singles, hits, but you never had a number one, haven't you?
Martin: No.
Interviewer: Why do you think you've never had a number one?
Marin: [sighs deeply]
Alan: Well, it's a very difficult question to answer to that, we just keep trying our best, and it's not vital to us to have a number one, anyway. Although it would be nice, of course, but...
Interviewer: What kind of difference does it make, though? I mean, is it enough for a band just to very well like you have done very well, or, really, is getting a number one very important? In terms of, obviously financially, and carrying on working afterwards.
Martin It's nice to carry on at this level. If we can carry on at this level for the next however much time, we would be happy. We're enjoying what we're doing, so...
Interviewer: Because with all the competition around, you're still there, which is great. I remember when you first played on Get Set For Summer, it was somewhere in this very studio! What was that, four years ago?
Martin: Something like that.
Interviewer: Four years ago. Right then, we go back to Lightwater Valley, to the questions that are asking questions coming down the Hellslide, and Mark asks, "If you hadn't taken pop music as your career, what would you have been?" What do you think you would have been, Martin?
Martin: Well, when I left school, I worked in a bank for a year, so just getting some money together, and if it hadn't taken off, I would still have been there, you know.
Interviewer: You must have been quite bright, because, you know, you can't just walk into a bank and get a job, you must have done quite well at school?
Martin: Reasonably well. But I think it's not that difficult to get a job in a bank, I don't think.
Interviewer: You got, what, five O-levels, or something?
Martin: Possibly, yeah.
Interviewer: Well that's not bad. That's more than I got! What did you get, tell us a bit about how you did at school.
Martin: I did quite well, I stayed until I was 18, I did 2 A-levels.
Interviewer: So he was bright, you see, he was very bright, he's just being modest about it. Alan? What about you, what would you have done?
Alan: Well, when I left school, I worked in a studio recording for a while, and I probably would... I mean, I would have been involved in the music business in some direction or other, I think, because it was the only thing I was ever really interested in. So maybe I would have still been there.
Interviewer: But did you ever visualise then that you would be performing, instead of just sort of working behind the scenes?
Alan: Well yeah, I wanted to, yeah. That's got how I got involved in a band, because I always wanted to be in a band.
Interviewer: Yeah? Right, wonderful.
-
Interviewer: Yes?
Martin: And, I think we've got some videos to give away today, and our question is, very simple: Where was it recorded? It's so simple, it's on the cover, but I've got to cover it up.
-
Interviewer: ... So many names, I'm just... What are you doing this weekend? what are you off to?
Alan: Well, Martin is flying back to Berlin, aren't you Martin?
Martin: I'll be in Berlin, probably.
Alan: He always pops over there.
Interviewer: You're based in Berlin?
Martin: That's right, yes.
Interviewer: Are you very well-known in Germany?
Martin: Quite well-known, yeah.
Interviewer: Yeah? As well-known as over here, probably more, I think?
Martin: Probably a bit more, yeah.
Interviewer: Great. Well, thanks to you both for coming in. It must've been very early. And thanks for having a shave during the programme, we appreciate that.
Alan: That's alright, yeah.
Interviewer: Right, now then, back to our Postcode competition, and question number five. Okay, here we go:-

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #23 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:20:30 »
1985-05-04 - Sounds (UK) - STD Review

http://tiptopwebsite.com/websites/index2.php?username=depechemodefile&page=12

Flexible rhythms, Classic Mode stuff ... thoroughly infectious.
Carol Linfield

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #24 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:20:59 »
1985-05-04 - No.1 (uk) - dave gahan the wild boy

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]





DAVE GAHAN: THE WILD BOY
[No. 1, 4th May 1985. Pictures: John Stoddart.]
" I loved the excitement of nicking a motor, screeching off and being chased by the police. Hiding behind a wall with your heart beating gives you a real kick – will they get you? "
Summary: First in a four-part series where each member of Depeche Mode talks individually about themselves, their lives, their career with Depeche Mode, and so on. Dave begins the series, and the article is composed solely of his quotes, discussing his tearaway years in Basildon and role within Depeche Mode. [1208 words]

    Depeche Mode are part underground cult, part pop stars.
    Despite their huge success they are still on Mute, a small independent label, and they refuse to compromise with the music business.
    The four individuals have stayed out of the glare of sensational publicity that is normally focussed on pop stars.
    But in our exclusive series they talk frankly about the forces that have shaped their lives and music. And they reveal a different side of Depeche Mode that is often very different from their clean-living public image…
    I was born in Chigwell but my parents divorced when I was very young so mum moved the family – my sister Sue and brothers Peter and Philip – to Basildon.
    She remarried and I always assumed my step-father was my real dad. He died when I was seven.
    Then I came home one day and found this bloke at home who turned out to be my father. I was very upset and we all had a huge argument because I thought I should have been told.
    Later I realised what a hard time mum had bringing us up.
    I didn’t help by getting into a lot of trouble. I wasn’t good at school (Barstaple). I couldn’t cope with being pushed around.
    You got categorised into grades so I resented the clever kids, started bunking off, got into bother with the law. I was suspended and ended up in juvenile court three times for things like nicking motors, setting them alight and spraying walls.
    I left at sixteen, soon as possible. My qualifications in art and technical drawing didn’t seem much use.
THE OUTCAST
    My best mate was called Mark. We did everything together – got into trouble together, pulled girls together, shared girlfriends.
    I went through loads of jobs. In eight months I had twenty occupations from Yardley’s perfume factory to labouring to Sainsbury’s soft drink man.
    I was bringing home good money, giving mum some, going down the pub, pulling, being a general wide boy.
    Finally, I realised I had no career so I went for a job as apprentice fitter with North Thames Gas. My probation officer told me to be honest at the interview, say I had a criminal record but I was a reformed character blah blah. Course I didn’t get the job because of that.
    It cost me a lot of confidence, having been through so many IQ tests and been shortlisted.
    I went back and trashed the probation office.
    I was pretty wild. I loved the excitement of nicking a motor, screeching off and being chased by the police. Hiding behind a wall with your heart beating gives you a real kick – will they get you?
    Eventually I got to Southend Art College. I liked art school. The teacher was a nice geezer who let us smoke. After three years I got the British Display Society Award which meant I could get a job doing display in a big store.
    That was around the punk period, 1977. [1] Good times. I enjoyed college, I was designing clothes for mates, going off to see Gen X and The Damned. I had original Sex shop gear. We used to stick labels on the outside and come down to the gritty London clubs like Studio 21.
    People like John Lydon (The Sex Pistols) and George O’Dowd (Culture Club) used to come to Southend. George came to model and nick stuff. He got into trouble for that.
    They were flamboyant people, like Steven Linnard (now a successful fashion designer), a big change after my rough and ready Basildon mates. Rowdy but artistic.
    A gang of us hung out together all living for the weekend, saving up for a bag of blues (pills), going without dinner all week. We’d go to London all night, end up at some party then catch the milk train from Liverpool Street to Billericay. It was a bloody long walk home!
    I got bored with that, but for a while it was exciting. I had a double life, mixing with the art school mob then going home to Bas. I’d go to the pub wearing makeup, but cos I knew the local beer boys, the spanners, I was OK.
ASSEMBLING DEPECHE MODE
    Vince Clarke I met one day outside a pub in the city centre. He looked up to me because he was a bit scared of the skins. His friends stayed at home.
    Vince had a band, French Look with Martin, Rob Marlowe, and Rob Allen who I mixed sound for.
    Then Vince started Composition Of Sound with Andy and Martin. The two groups fell out because both wanted Martin. Typically, he couldn’t make up his mind, being nice to everyone.
    One day Vince asked me if I wanted to sing at a rehearsal. I was quite shy but it was something to do. That was the beginning of Depeche Mode.
    We got a residency at Crocs in Rayleigh as resident electronic band, people came from London to see us (Culture Club also built up an early Crocs following). Rusty Egan (club socialite then Visage drummer) was one. He introduced us to Stevo (Some Bizzare mentor) who was just a general nutter on the scene.
    The group met Daniel Miller (of Mute Records) shortly after our first Venue gig (New Romantic package night). He put out our first single just after the Some Bizzare track. Lots of companies were waving cheque books and promising the earth but only Daniel was honest. He offered us points (a share in the profits). We split everything fifty / fifty.
    Even now we have no management deal and no contract. We pay our own salaries and don’t have aggressive marketing.

SELF CONTROL
    Keeping control is important to us and Mute. We’ve kept out grass roots following. The fans are so hard core that singles tend to chart quickly without hyping so we spend our money on decent stage shows and recording.
    I’m not interested in image making. Depeche Mode has never had idealised group pictures on records. We prefer visuals and imagery. Four blokes standing against a wall wearing nice suits doesn’t excite me. A look dates.
    We’ve matured at our own pace. When we did “Speak And Spell” we were very young and naïve. We got slagged of for being teeny bopper because we didn’t care what was hip.
    Even we knew we didn’t have much to say, and the fans still stood by us. We owe them a lot because they never were influenced by the knockers, or by Vince leaving.
    As for the group, our working class background keeps us fairly level headed despite the stupid amounts of money to be made.
    For now the group is still growing up so I’m very happy about the future. Depeche Mode is a group which has good ideas rather than being a great bunch of musicians first. We learn all the time.
    I’ve got other ambitions, like writing songs. I have tried – but Martin is so good at that it would be silly to offer the group something second rate.
    We’ve practically lived together for five years, so you know immediately when someone doesn’t like what you’re doing.
    I’ll concentrate on the singing. I think I’m pretty good at that.
[1] - Dave must have got a bit confused here - he would have left school in summer 1978 at 16, and was "requested to leave" art college in mid 1981 due to the amount of time he was spending out of college with Depeche Mode. So art school could only have been in these three years.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #25 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:21:16 »
1985-05-08 - Smash Hits (UK) - Shake The Disease Review

[Thanks to mossy for scanning this for this forum!]
http://likepunkneverhappened.blogspot.com/2015/05/may-8-21-1985.html



Depeche Mode: Shake The Disease (Mute)
The usual obscure lyrics from Depeche Mode. After hearing it, I still don't know what "Share The Disease" means. With so many dodgy diseases in the headlines these days, I can only wonder exactly what they're trying to tell us about the state of their health... Still this is a soft ballad and a nice record.



1985-05-10 - Various Countries - Montreux Golden Rose Rock Festival

Shake The Disease: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qQbuSmCRWvI





1985-05-10 - Unknown (Switzerland) - Band Audio Interview

https://www.box.com/s/wdd7o67gykb2cb88t5uf

[I made a transcript. The interviewer is very hard to hear!]

Interviewer: Welcome to Switzerland. For the first time here?
Andy: Thank you.
Interviewer: Is it your first time here, are you playing your first gig in Switzerland? Do you count your gigs, do you know, is it the first?
Andy: Well we've done one in Switzerland, one in Switzerland.
Interviewer: And all together, the gigs in total?
Andy: In Switzerland?
Interviewer: No, not in Switzerland.
Andy: I don't, a good few hundreds.
Interviewer: You don't have counted.
Martin: Hundreds and hundreds.
Interviewer: Hundreds.
Dave: Yeah, literally hundreds.
Interviewer: Yeah you've toured in Germany, Italy...
Andy: Yeah, we've been eveywhere, yeah.
Interviewer: Yeah, and Japan, and that's what I wanted to know. About the audience, Japanese or Chinese, or the audience in Germany and everything. Are there any difference? Which one do you prefer, or...?
Andy: They're all good. They're all good audiences. The Japanese react differently, for instance, at the end of a song they clap like this [claps], you know. They don't make any noise during the song, and they just go wild at the end.
Interviewer: Because I heard on-
Andy: -The Italians like to shout a lot.
Interviewer: Yeah, that's pretty normal.
Andy: You know, just general chanting.
Alan: Actually, they're the best singers, aren't they?
Andy: Yeah, the Italians are the best singers. The English is the worst. The worst thing is Ber-
Martin: The Germans tend to put their lighters in the air, more than anybody else.
Andy: Oh, yeah.
Martin: During the slow songs. If a song is sort of slow for 10 seconds, they'll get their lighters out.
Andy: Yeah, it's marvellous. And they throw them at us.
Interviewer: And Germany is more younger people, more kids, than in England, or...?
Andy: Oh, no.
Alan: Not really.
Andy: The audiences are roughly the same. In fact, quite a lot more blokes, I think, in Germany, not more men. And I would say it's an older audience.
Interviewer: Because, I recognised in the German papers that the interfaces are much more, you know, for kids-
Andy: There isn't really many serious German music papers. They're all really aimed at young kids.
Alan: The thing is, in Germany especially, we don't have much control over the teenage magazines. If they want to put us in there, they put us in there. And we don't want our audiences-
Andy: -lots of stories-
Alan: -And it's hard knock, it's tough, you know.
Andy: They'll make up lots of stories, really, really bad stories about us.
Interviewer: You had no idea, but...?
Andy: No. If we say-
Dave: - The things that certain people lie, you know. They just print lies or do a feature that was in Bravo magazine last week. There was a whole feature that was just like a complete farce. And really, there's nothing that you can do about that. They'll do it even... And that was when the person who had done the feature actually came to the concert and actually saw what went on, and then went away and wrote complete lies. But there's nothing you can do about it. You could sue them if you like, but it would obviously take a lot of trouble.
Alan: Sometimes they write good articles, you know.
Dave: Not very often.
Alan: And sometimes it's lies, but the point is that we have no control over it.
Andy: In Britain, for instance, we decide what magazines we want to be in and when we want to do them.
Interviewer: And they'll go and pay them?
Andy: Yeah.
Interviewer: So you can do something and you can read it and they'll pay for an article?
Andy: No, no, no, no. Once you decide to do an article, you just got more control who you do it with, and-
Interviewer: -Well I think it's a dangerous thing, in a way, for example, this Bravo magazine. The kids, they believe in everything, and they put you in a kind of box...
Andy: Yeah. Well there's one particular article where they said that we didn't sign autographs and things like that, and we only played the music for over twenties. And that was really harmful for us, and we got-
Martin: -We got some bad letters after that.-
Andy: -We got bad letters after that, which is total lies.
Interviewer: When you started with the band, you played guitar? Bass?
Andy: Yeah.
Interviewer: And now you don't find them anymore useful, or...?
Andy: We haven't played them for three or four years now. It was only very early on when we played them, we're not very good.
Interviewer: And for yourself?
Andy: Martin, for instance, he could play a couple of bits of guitar and-
Alan: -He still writes the songs with guitars, often.
Martin: When I first start writing a song I sort of work the chords and the beat with the guitar-
Interviewer: -with a guitar, and then-
Martin: -yeah, I transfer it to keyboards.
-
Martin: It's funny, because we've been asked about song this more than any other. It's sort of that religion seems to be a very touchy subject. You can sing about sex and sort of nearly get away with it, but religion seems to sort of stir people more. It wasn't really intended to have that sort of effect. It was just something that everyone feels at some point or another. And you always-
Dave: -You don't want to promote that.-
Martin: I think everybody [who] sort of goes through a bad hatch, they get this sort of feeling, and that God is just, like, some kind of big joke, and he'll laugh at us all.
Interviewer: And it got banned on TV, or...?
Alan: Not officially, but we've suffered because of the lyrics, we have suffered that we don't get as much airplay. And also, when we did Top Of The Pops with the song, the next day there was loads of letters complaining, and they said that they wouldn't have us back on doing that song again. Unfortunately, we didn't go up high enough to get on there anyway, so we don't know if they would have carried on their threat. But it's not like an official ban, they haven't said "This record is bad". But I think we did suffer a bit because of the lyrics.
Interviewer: Do you think that it's in England more important, or more contradicting?
Andy: Well, there, everyone understands the lyrics, and that's the problem. Abroad, say Europe for instance, the major problem that we are having a bit, in fact, is that it's too long for a single. But they don't really understand the lyrics, I mean, a few people like yourself actually understand what the lyrics are saying.
Interviewer: Well it's the title of the song that expects the meaning of the song.
Andy: A lot of people can't even say that.
Interviewer: Yeah! Exactly! [laughter] But, don't you think your German fans, who don't understand, could use a title like See You or New Life?
Martin: We'll take that into consideration next time. [laughter]
Interviewer: Thank you.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #26 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:21:49 »
1985-05-11 - No.1 (uk) - martin gore the decadent boy

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]





MARTIN GORE: THE DECADENT BOY
[No. 1, 11th May 1985. Pictures: John Stoddart.]
" People imagine I’ve got kinky habits but my worst vice is video games. Well, I have got a few others but you’d be far too interested in them. "
Summary: A Martin Gore monologue, composed of short quotes and soundbites, threaded together into a sort of potted life story. This gives a series of glimpses rather than a coherent story, and Martin's mischievous humour regularly peeps through. If you don't go into this expecting too much, you'll have a thoroughly pleasant time. [1178 words]

    “I’m 23 I think. I was born in London but raised as a kid in Dagenham where Dad was a Ford’s worker and Mum was a telephonist at the car factory. I’ve got two teenage sisters.
    I led a normal childhood. Family life was stable, nothing too traumatic occurred.
    I remember I was a very good boy until the age of five when I went through a phase of beating up other children. One day my mother caught me putting a brick over another child’s head. My father was furious. He told me never to hit anyone else again.
    I’m glad I got such a talking to, it made me very passive and harmless.
    I went to a general comprehensive – Nicholas, in Basildon – where I played cricket for the school team.
    My interest in Germany started when I went on school exchange trips to Schleswig-Holstein. I found German a boring subject but I enjoyed staying on a farm.
    Country life is alright in small doses. I liked milking the cows.
POP APPEAL
    Interest in pop music stemmed from a couple of things. Firstly, I was heavily into the teen mag Disco 45. I had hundreds of them and used to read all the song words. I can still remember all those lyrics though I haven’t got a good memory for anything else.
    About that time, 13, I had a crush on “Donna” by 10cc.
    A friend taught me a few guitar chords and we started to write songs. Obviously, looking back they were awful but I was proud of them then.
    I didn’t have many pop heroes but I nearly joined Gary Glitter’s fan club. The glamour of early 70s pop appealed. Although I refrained from becoming a member I did hunt high and low for his version of “Baby Please Don’t Go” – it’s terrible but it made me want to be a pop star.
    I did all that posing in front of the mirror bit.
    After that I went through a big Bryan Ferry phase, had all his solo albums and pictures of him in his tuxedo plastered over my wall.
    My only pop hero today is Jonathan Richman because he has such a warm rapport with an audience.
    I did suffer from a suburban outlook. I didn’t go to a gig until I was 17! I’d hardly even been to London which was half an hour away from Basildon by train.
A CLERICAL CAREER
    I got French and German A-Levels (failed maths) and then had to make a decision about the future, which shocked me greatly.
    I didn’t have the necessary motivation to do much, like going to university. I didn’t want to leave school, I felt secure there.
    If all this fell through I could see myself studying, I certainly wouldn’t go back to bank work.
    Aah, the bank. My first job. I worked at the NatWest clearing house in the City for a year and a half on grade one. It was mind-crushingly dull but my lack of imagination and confidence meant I couldn’t see an alternative.
    Languages were what I wanted to work with but translation jobs were hard to find.
COMPOSITION OF SOUND
    I was still writing songs and saved up enough money to buy a Yamaha 5 synthesiser. It cost £200.
    Me, Andy Fletcher and Vince Clarke started mucking about together. Vince was a local kid who lived minutes away, Andy I knew from going along to Boys Brigade and church.
    I went strictly as an observer. Maybe he thought he could convert me.
    Robert Marlow mixed sound for us… we were called Composition of Sound.
    The name Depeche Mode came from Dave much later. He was doing fashion design and window display and used the magazine Depeche Mode as a reference. It means hurried fashion or fashion dispatch. I like the sound of that.
    The further we got into the pop world the more I changed. It was like a Before and After advert. Before, I was quiet, introverted, conscientious. I was a long-haired hippy like everyone else. Afterwards I realised I could do something other people might like.
BLACK LEATHER
    I bought my first leather jacket when I was 18. I’ve developed a love for black leather which is hypocritical because, like Alan, I’m a vegetarian – for moral and health reasons.
    Black leather is striking and simple. It’s only for the image but I’d also like a motor bike. Couldn’t pull it off though.
    Maybe this leather fetish springs from seeing an old Marlon Brando movie, called The Fugitive Kind, where he wore a snakeskin outfit that was pretty cool.
    Cars I hate, they’re immoral.
KINKY HABITS
    When people ask me what my interests are today I can’t think of much. I was never into politics – a dubious profession – too much power, not enough principle.
    People imagine I’ve got kinky habits but my worst vice is video games. Well, I have got a few others but you’d be far too interested in them.
    I have a very loud laugh when I get going. Humour is important to me, it’s in a lot of what the group does. But not conventional humour: that bores me. Situation comedy leaves me cold.
    An average day for me might start by getting up at midday and composing on my guitar, sampling sounds until eight.
    I’m not a great musician. None of us is except Alan. My interest is in melody lines and lyrics.
    I collect records. I like stuff on the Atatak label and mainstream alternatives like Joy Division and The Ramones. Of the New Romantics I admired what Boy George did.
    Sexual barriers are silly. My girlfriend and I swap clothes, make-up, anything. So what? It’s a shock though to read in a magazine like Bravo that I walk around dressed as a woman. They’ll invent anything.
    As well as George I’ve liked Soft Cell and Marc And The Mambas. Metal music people like Neubaten have good ideas, some of which we may nick, but I can’t listen to them. Kraftwerk yes, they have instant melody.
    Sixties pop is good. The Beach Boys, even doo-wop. Simple harmony vocal stuff.
BACK IN BERLIN
    Depeche used the futurist tag to break into the pop mainstream. It fitted us, all that suburban self-expression. Now we do what we do without desperate media measures. We’ve kept out of the national press since 1981 so I don’t think we can achieve Duran-type success.
    It’s so easy to become massive in the UK and then to disappear. On the other hand we didn’t promote ourselves in Europe much and we’re very popular.
    I moved to Berlin because the 24-hour aspects of city life suit me. I’m happy to stay out all night. Is that decadent?
    I haven’t been able to spend much time in my Berlin flat yet but it’s close enough so that I can be back in Basildon in two hours.
    One thing that does annoy me. My mum threw out all my Disco 45s a few years ago. I’ve never forgiven her for that.”

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #27 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:23:19 »
1985-05-15 - ZDF (Germany) - P.I.T.

Shake The Disease: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EFeh8TGOVrQ



Interviewer: Viel Fans hier. Und was soll ich den machen, Depeche Mode, ein ganz andere Musik als die Stones, aber, vielleicht gibt es irgendwie zusammenhänge. [Many fans here. What should I say, Depeche Mode, a very different kind of music than the Stones, but perhaps there are some connections.] Do you like the Stones, the Rolling Stones?
Dave: Yeah, they're great, man.
Interviewer: Yeah, you like? But your music is very different from it.
Dave: Yeah.
Interviewer: And your new song is a little bit slower than the others. Is it a new style of music of Depeche Mode, a slower one?
Dave: Yeah.
Interviewer: Nach einige überlegen sagt er "Ja". Na ja, wir werden sehen. [After a bit of consideration he says "Yeah". Well, we will see.] And the new song, what's the content?
Dave: Sorry?
Interviewer: What is the content, eh...?
Dave: It's basically a love song.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #28 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:24:06 »
1985-05-18 - ITV (UK) - No. 73 (Series 5 Show 15)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QUZ_rK8nuEs



[I made a transcript:]

Kim: Hi Andy, how are you Fletch? Glad you could make it this morning. Shall we watch a video?
Dave: Eh, yeah, sounds like a good idea.
Kim: Glad you brought it down. What was it called?
Dave: It's a new single and it's called Shake The Disease.
Kim: That's the first time you've ever seen it this early, eh?
Dave: Eh, yeah, you could say that, yeah.
Kim: It's been doing okay in the charts, then?
Dave: Yeah, it's up to 25.
[music video plays]
Kim: God, you guys wrote some fantastic lyrics, I mean, Blasphemous Rumours, it was fantastic.
Dave: Yeah.
Kim: What's the sentiment behind Shake The Disease?
Dave: Eh, well it's basically a love song, and it's really about the problems of not being able to get across what you really mean, in love, when you're actually trying to talk to someone that you, let's say, fancy, you know, you fancy someone at school or whatever and you're trying to talk to them. Sometimes it's very difficult, you know, and that's what it's basically about. And he's trying to shake that disease of not being able to talk to people-
Kim: -So you think of being in love is a bit like a disease, do you? [laughs]
Dave: Eh, no, I better not say that.
Kim: You're basically the pioneers of the synthesized pop... eh, getting it into the charts with synthesized pop music. But that was a long time ago, I mean, you're still real young-
Andy: -It wasn't that long, it wasn't that long.
Kim: Well, it feels like it.
Dave: We are getting a bit old.
Kim: You must have been real weeners when you actually cracked the charts.
Andy: Well, I think we was about 18 when we started, 19-
Dave: -I was 18, when we first started.
Kim: So was it a bit like, left school, and it happened?
Andy: Well, you know, I suppose so. We sort of left school when we was 18, well, Dave left a bit early.
Dave: I left I bit earlier.
Andy: Worked for about a year or so and then we suddenly was in the charts, you know?
Kim: Was it quite hard to cope with being young, first time, all that exposure?
Andy: Well, no, I think it helped that we was young. I mean before-
Dave: -We took it all in our strive, really, it wasn't any big deal, it wasn't as if we were old enough to really understand what was going on.
Kim: Right.
Andy: We made quite a few mistakes because we was naive and we just everything, really, that came along.
Kim: Yeah. And your old mates are on their way, and let's think about Basildon. You see, you come from Basildon, right? Now, I've heard that there's like a Basildon musical map here, I mean, lots of good stuff comes out of there. Why is that?
Dave: I don't know, really. I think it's because it's quite near Southend, and Southend has always been known for producing good music, good r'n'b and stuff, like the Feelgoods and stuff like that, you know.
Kim: And Yazoo and Alf.
Dave: Yeah, and there's Alison, and there's Vince, you know, still doing... Well, I don't know, it quite a big place, really. People think it's very small, but it's quite a big place.
Kim: Do the other kids around the area sort of look up to you, gives them something to look up for?
Andy: No, they give us a lot of stick.
Kim: Do they?
Dave: No, it's alright. It's alright, really, we can go out shopping and like that, we don't get into any trouble going shopping and things. I think a lot of people are quite proud that we actually do quite well for Basildon, you know.
Kim: Yeah, it gives them inspiration, I would think, yeah. What's next? I know you've just come from Germany and...?
Dave: Well, we just heard that we've charted in America, so that's good news to us, because we've been touring in America, and now we're actually seeing something from that. So that's great news.
Andy: We're doing some festivals in the summer.
Dave: We're doing some festivals in the summer... What was that?
Kim: Sounds like... Sounds like Harry?
Dave: Sounds like he's hurt.
Kim: It does.
-
Sandi: Let's do the sandwich quiz.
[audience cheers]
Sandi: I think that's the loudest sandwich quiz we ever had. Shall we have our hostess with our [mount stash?]?
Bobby: Thank you, thank you, thank you.
Sandi: Okay, good to have you here. Please, come on then.
Bobby: My name is Bruce Forsyth.
Sandi: And can I have your name, please?
Andy: I can't do an impersonation, no. [audience cheers]
Sandi: No? That's one sandwich for honesty, there. Okay, Fletch from Depeche Mode against Bobby Dabro. Okay, open questions for either of can answer if you think you know the answer, bash the head of your knife on the table there! Open question: what is a pongo? Is it a stick with a spring, an African ape, or a bad smell?
Bobby: [bashes table with knife]
Sandi: Yes?
Bobby: It's aaa.... Can you repeate the question, please?
[audiences gasps]
Bobby: It's a bird, bird bird!
Andy: He didn't know the answer there.
Sandi: It's not a bird. Do you know what the answer is?
Andy: It's a smell.
Sandi: It's an African ape, in fact. It's an African ape. Okay, open question either of you can answer: what am I drinking?
Andy: [bashes table with knife] Water.
Bobby: Water.
Sandi: Water, absolutely right.
Andy: [to Bobby] You haven't done the thing [bashing table with knife].
Sandi: That's right, Fletch, okay Fletch, here's a piece of bread, what kind of filling are you gonna go for?
Andy: I think I'll have some egg.
Sandi: You want a bit of egg.
[...]
Sandi: We digress, we digress. It's your filling, Fletch, for your filling, for your egg, what I want you to do is, I want you to make the face of a bloodhound.
Andy: I can't do that.
Sandi: Yes, you can, come on now.
Andy: [tries some face expressions]
Sandi: Well that's either bloodhound or Clement Freud. Okay, so there's two [breads] there and one [bread] there. Okay, open question either of you can answer, what animal has youngs which are called joeys?
Bobby: [bashes table on knife]
Sandi: Yes?
Bobby: Eh, joeys, that's a, "boing, boing", kangeroo.
[...]
Sandi: Okay, it's two each, come on now Fletch. Look at what a nice tall boy he is, isn't that nice? Okay, which king ruled England before Henry the 8th?
Bobby: [bashes table with knife]
Sandi: Yes?
Bobby: Eh, Henry the 7th?
Sandi: Absolutely right.
[...]
Sandi: That makes it 3 to 2, come on now Fletch. You'll get this one Fletch, come on Fletch.
Andy: Yeah, come on then.
Sandi: What city would you see if you were standing on Brooklyn Bridge?
Bobby: [bashes knife on table] Vienna! I had a postcard!
Sandi: No, I'm sorry, that's not right.
Andy: New York.
Sandi: Okay, now what I want you to do, this is a musical question, I'm sure you can do this. Can you do the hornpipe?
Andy: What, the sailor's hornpipe?
Sandi: Yeah, the sailor's hornpipe?
[everyone imitates the hornpipe, Fletch stands awkwardly]
Fletch: If it's alright then, I'll have one of those.
Sandi: Okay, no problem at all. Okay, open question, either of you can answer, it's 3 to 3. What is the common name for your umbilicus?
[both Bobby and Andy smash the table with their knives]
Andy: Belly button!
Sandi: Yes, Fletch?
Andy: Belly button.
Sandi: Belly button. Okay, here's your filling question. What I want you to do, imagine that there's a 73 ton elephant on your foot.
Bobby: Right toe, right toe, it's on your right toe.
Andy: Okay so, it's on my right toe, right? Okay: elephant, get off.
[audience cheers]
Sandi: Okay, right, so, in fact it's 4 to 3 now, come on then. Okay, open question, either of you can answer, who did the Americans fight against in the American civil war?
Bobby: [bashes knife on table] Ah! The British!
Sandi: No, the American civil war.
Andy: No one, they fought each other.
Sandi: That's right. [a buzz rings] woah, last question, the filling question, I want you to name the main four London line stations.
Andy: Fenchurch street, Liverpool street, Victoria, and Houston.
[audience cheers]
Sandi: The score is 5 to 3, we move on to current affairs, we up the stage, you can eat the whole sandwich if you got the question right. I hope you've been taking your tabloids. Okay, open question either of you can answer, I want you to name the two teams in the Scottish FA cup.
Bobby: [bashes knife on table] ... No! No, no, I didn't do it!
Sandi: Trick question there.
Andy: I reckon it's Dundee versus... Aberdeen.
Sandi: No! Dundeed versus Celtic, but we'll give you half a sandwich for that, there you go, half a sandwich. Open question either of you can answer, it's 5,5 to 3: Can you name the two teams in the FA cup?
Andy: [bashes knife against table]
Sandi: Yes?
Andy: Everton and Manchester United.
Sandi: Absolutely right. Okay, here we go. Open question either of you can answer, why are Bronski Beat going for the Soft Cell?
Andy: [bashes knife against table]
Sandi: Yes?
Andy: What I know is that Marc Almond is singing-
Sandi: Marc Almond, late of Soft Cell, is taking over the lead singer of Bronski Beat.
Andy: [hugs Bobby] I'll give him a sandwich, then.
Bobby: Ah, thank you.
Andy: He needs it, he needs it.
Sandi: So that's one sandwich for you, as a gift from the man from Depeche Mode. Okay, why was Bruce Springsteen's wedding on and off and then on again this week?
Bobby: [bashes knife against table] Because he didn't know the girl very well.
[laughter]
Sandi: I think one [sandwich] for originality.
Bobby: I think so, yeah.
Sandi: Even if that's not true. The real answer is: because he and his bride had apparently faked the ceremony to get rid off the press last week and actually married on Wednesday this week.Open question either of you can answer, it's 6,5 to 5: Why is it likely that Michael Prey could be killed off twice in six months?
Bobby: [bashes knife against table] Because he's in disentry, and everyone's getting shot to bits.
Sandi: And he also died as...?
Bobby: And he has also died as a comedian.... No? Oh, Robin Hood?
Sandi: Robin Hood! Absolutely right, but in fact, so close, 6,5 to 6, but Fletch from Depeche Mode is this week's sandwich quiz winner!
[audience cheers]

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #29 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:24:40 »
1985-05-18 - No.1 (uk) - andy fletcher the brigade boy

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]




ANDY FLETCHER: THE BRIGADE BOY
[No. 1, 18th May 1985. Pictures: John Stoddart.]
" After having taken the mickey my workmates were finally impressed when they saw our publicity photos and the posters I’d photo-copy in the office. "
Summary: After the colourful stories of Dave and Martin, Andy comes across as the strong, silent anchorman of Depeche Mode in this third instalment of a series of interviews. In fact, Andy has comparatively little to say about himself, and for some part of the interview gives the band's history. There's still plenty about his hobbies and private opinions that you don't see elsewhere. [1138 words]
               
    Whatever you imagined about Depeche Mode, the truth is stranger – and a lot more interesting. After Dave Gahan’s tales of teenage rampage, and Martin Gore’s perverse paradoxes, we come to Andy…
    A founder member of Depeche, his quiet stage presence hides an even quieter nature: a contrast to the forthright Gahan and Gore. But perhaps it’s this unique combination of characters that gives the Mode its strength and unity…
    My parents were among the first to move to Basildon when it was still a very new town in the early 1960s.
    Basildon is part of the South East urban sprawl which stretches to Southend. It’s been very badly designed. There are 200,000 people living there and only one cinema. There’s nothing for young people to do despite the fact that Basildon has a huge population of under-25 year-olds.
    It also has terrible unemployment. My parents moved from Nottingham, where I was born, so dad could work at Carrere’s cigarette factory. He got laid off.
    I became involved in the church by accident when I was eight. Dad suggested I join the Boys Brigade so I could play football. I stayed in BB until I was 18.
    We had an active social life which revolved around the church seven days a week. My parents aren’t religious, but I was. On Saturdays there was a BB coffee bar where I’d try to preach to the yobs.
    I’m no longer a practising Christian but it remains in the blood. I still feel guilty about not going to church.
    It wasn’t all prayers and religion, which is a very unfashionable topic these days. There were also Christian pop festivals. U2 played at one a few years ago. They’ve got a massive Christian following.
    Me and Vince Clarke were into the preaching side – trying to convert non-believers. Vince was number three in the local hierarchy, although he’s a total atheist now.
    Of course we got stick for our beliefs. The most embarrassing thing was attending parades in Bas wearing full BB uniform. That period shaped my moral beliefs and attitudes.
    I went to Nicholas Comprehensive and was in the same sixth form class as Martin Gore and Alison Moyet. I took politics A-Level and wanted to go to university.
    Vince and I had a group when we were 16 called No Romance In China which tried to be like The Cure. We were into their ‘Imaginary Boys’ LP. Vince used to attempt to sing like Robert Smith.
    At that time we were going to a club called Van Gogh where Martin was playing in a guitar duo called Norman And The Worms. Alison’s group The Vandals were also regulars. It was a good scene.
    Martin, Vince and I teamed together and started rehearsing in Woodlands Youth Club. The earliest Depeche songs like ‘Photographic’ were written then.
    Martin bought a synthesiser and we played a gig at Woodlands in front of an audience of nine-year-olds. They loved the synths, which were a novelty then. The kids were onstage twiddling the knobs while we played.
    Depeche was completed when we nicked Dave. He knew the Southend social scene, which enabled us to get gigs playing in front of 300 people. Our image was New Romantic post-Blitz kids with frilly shirts.
    I had a job at the same time. I was working as an insurance clerk for Sun Life and being a regular commuter. It was well paid but it only qualified as an existence.
    People at work didn’t take my group seriously until ‘Dreaming Of Me’ got into the charts followed by ‘New Life’. I was doing Top Of The Pops or playing in, say, Leeds, and then working the next day. It got very awkward.
    After having taken the mickey my workmates were finally impressed when they saw our publicity photos and the posters I’d photo-copy in the office. When Dave got on the cover of Sounds they were convinced. [1]
    We were raw but the songs were good. I heard an Italian bootleg of a very old Depeche concert recently and it didn’t sound bad at all.
    Martin had been writing good songs since he was 14 but I didn’t really know him until I persuaded him to come to BB. I suppose I thought I’d convert him. He came for the singing and the atmosphere.
    The song ‘Blasphemous Rumours’ stems from our experiences then. There was a prayer list of people who were sick in some way and you’d pray for the person on top of that list until they died.
    When Martin first played me ‘Blasphemous Rumours’ I was quite offended. I can see why people would dislike it. It certainly verges on the offensive.
 
Learning From History     
    My private life away from music is simple and ordinary. I live with my girlfriend and her mum on the outskirts of Basildon.
    If I go out I do things like play snooker or football or hang out with two friends who are DJs. I go to see Chelsea when I can.
    I’m reading a lot at the moment, particularly books about Germany between the wars and the rise of the Third Reich, the life of Hitler and his rise to power. Albert Speer’s biography is fascinating.
    I’ve always been most interested in political history. We can learn a lot from the rise of fascism. For instance, studying the Nazis teaches you that proportional representation is extremely dangerous. [2] Hitler came to power with a minority vote.
    My own political beliefs are very confused. I’m not totally socialist.
    I’m very patriotic, very pro-British. I know some people think that’s wrong but I can’t help it. I don’t believe we should give up our side of the nuclear deterrent. If we surrendered our nuclear weapons, Britain’s stature would disappear. I’m a bit of a soldier at heart.
    The Labour Party is weak now, it still lacks leadership – but if I ever voted it would be for Labour, even though some of my ideas are quite right-wing. I don’t mind the Alliance.
    I’m a firm believer in the welfare state and the abolition of private schools so you can see it’s difficult to describe me.
    If you asked me two years ago whether I wanted children I’d have said definitely not, but the urge increases as you get older.
    I don’t believe in marriage, I think it’s a pointless institution. Having said that, I’d probably get married anyway for conventional reasons. I am quite a conventional type.
    My home life was always very happy and stable. I got on fine with my parents and my two sisters and brother – all younger than me.
    Mum still worries like mad about me when Depeche are on tour. Not because she thinks I’d be a bad boy – she knows I wouldn’t – but just in case I didn’t come home afterwards.
[1] - That's the 27th June 1981 edition.
[2] - Two years later, Andy would change his view of this subject: "Our electoral system is vicious enough to play against the majority", he said to the French magazine Best (November 1987).  "Back home, in Basildon, the Tories got 20,000 votes, Labour 18,000 and the Liberals 12,000. The right with their 20,000 got the seat, even if 30,000 of their citizens voted against them!  That’s disgusting. If you project that on a national scale, it’s even more revolting."