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Author Topic: 1985: The Singles 81>85  (Read 48135 times)

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #30 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:26:14 »
1985-05-23 - BBC (UK) - Top Of The Pops

Shake The Disease: www.youtube.com/watch?v=u3tMFpyDn5g

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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #31 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:27:23 »
1985-05-24 - ARD (Germany) - WWF Club

Shake The Disease: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pNOBPzyEHS4

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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #32 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:33:43 »
1985-05-25 - Record mirror (uk) - the last of the futurists

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]




THE LAST OF THE FUTURISTS
[Record Mirror, 25th May 1985. Words: Betty Page. Pictures: Ian Hooton.]
" “I think they really appreciate it if the way you work is on the same level. Obviously, we’re a lot wealthier than we were five years ago, but it’s all down to our attitude towards money. You’ve got to be careful about greed. We’re not surrounded by people all the time, there’s no-one telling us we’re the greatest thing.” "
Summary: Band interview at the time of the release of Shake The Disease. The lyrics to Flexible spark off a discussion on the difficulties a successful band has in staying true to its roots - and another on Martin's, er, "flexible" dress sense. The article implicitly lauds them for keeping their music values, but it runs the risk of putting them nicely back in the New Romantic pigeonhole when other writers were finally taking a second look. [1420 words]

    There are fifteen thousand futurists in Orange County, California. Not many people know that, but Depeche Mode discovered them single-handed. Yeah, you remember futurists, running concurrent with frilly new romantics, all silly haircuts, one finger synths and even sillier dancesteps. All of five years ago it started, and America’s only just caught up. The Deps have come along a bit since then, but Orange County just lurves them.
    Fletch (aka Andy, the one who still gets mercilessly ribbed): “We missed the boat in America a couple of years ago, we didn’t bother going – now there seems to be hardly any British bands there and we’ve gone and done a hugely successful tour.”
    Dave Gahan (goatee-less, now blond bombshell): “And we’re the most talked about… We got nothing but good reviews and we found in Dallas, Houston Chicago, even in the sticks, that there were futurists everywhere.”
    Yep, hip hop’s still huge Stateside and they’ve only just got used to hearing the twiddle of knobs. Hence the Basildon invasion and takeover. Dave: “I think if FM stations started playing more British music like ours, there’d be a big audience for it.”
    Back home, “Shake The Disease” shakes the charts and sees Martin Gore take his poignantly observant, melodic lovesong style to further maturity. “It’s a good song,” says Dave, “which is something that’s been lacking in the charts lately – they’ve been in a real state. There’s a lot of American music there and nothing to really grab hold of, no new thing. We’re still out and out futurists, though!”
    “Mart’s gone all lovey dovey now. We know it’s always the actual song quality that matters – it’s melody, and we’re more mellow now. Some of the things that have been successful recently have just been rhythm tracks, basically what we did on the new B-Side as a bit of fun in the studio.”
    Said B-Side is a rampantly danceable ditty called “Flexible”, all about ideals popping out the window when success is sniffed. Does this happen? Dave: “Yeah – futurist bands start using bass guitars and throwing their synths out. You have to compromise, though, we’ve had to quite a lot.”
    Andy: “We’re basically working class kids, and when you’re shoved into stardom, when you’ve suddenly got a lot of money from nothing, it’s easy to lose perspective.”
    Dave: “It’s the power, too – bands get too wrapped up in their own egos. It’s a shame when a working class band come up through the clubs preaching about their roots, and then they go and forget about all that.”
    Andy: “I think if you want to stay successful it’s important to have something the kids can identify with; some bands might say kids love to watch us jetset around, but I think that’s rubbish really.”
    Dave: “I think they really appreciate it if the way you work is on the same level. Obviously, we’re a lot wealthier than we were five years ago, but it’s all down to our attitude towards money. You’ve got to be careful about greed. We’re not surrounded by people all the time, there’s no-one telling us we’re the greatest thing.”
    Martin arrives, freshly maquillaged, sporting his usual ensemble of leather skirt (no trews this time), and fetching black and red lace camisole, the like of which I wouldn’t mind for myself. This is the man responsible for the probing lyrics of “Flexible”.
    “It’s a kind of a joke,”  reveals Mart. “Cos I’m sure for instance if my mum looked at me now, she’d think “what has it done to you?” And the actual style of the music was meant to be quite jokey, cos if you imagine after the initial new romantic / futurist thing, a lot of bands thought we can’t make it playing this kind of music, so they all went into salsa, all those trends, trying to hit on something that might be successful. This was trying to combine all these jokey styles.”
    Depeche Mode have braved trends for 4½ years now. I remember them then, fresh-faced naïve young lads posing nervously for photos in the Rough Trade stockroom for their first ever interview. Mute was the operative word. “Eeeech!” shrieks Dave at the memory. Do they look back and think “that couldn’t be us”? Dave: “Yeah, we do it all the time. We totally understand why people hated the way we looked, took the mickey, cos we do it now.”
    Andy: “We were very young then, we were just off the street and looked it. They boy-next door thing came when they told us to smile – we just smiled, we were new, we thought you had to. When you’re five, that’s what you’re taught to do.”
    Dave: “It’s all part of growing up within ourselves and within the band. We’ve progressed really well, the music’s matured with us cos we’ve had room to breathe rather than just being pushed into a certain style. The only thing that hasn’t changed really is that we’re an out-and-out electronic band, and we’re not ashamed of it – the only surviving futurist band! But there’s a big market for futurism, and no-one realises it – it’s the biggest thing in Europe.”
    Sweet little boys always grow up, especially ones that look like choirboys. Now, Martin Gore wouldn’t look out of place in that cheeky fetish club we won’t mention. “I hardly have to buy any clothes these days,” he says innocently. “When the fans realise what sort of style you’re after, they throw things onstage – I’ve got tons of necklaces.” Shame, but they don’t catapult leather skirts stagewards.
    “I was working it out the other day,” he continues, “it’s quite good, when you start off in one direction, fans throw things on, then you’re taking their style. It’s better than having a stylist.”
    So come on Mart, what does your mother say about what you wear?
    “She accepts it now, I’m quite surprised really. When I went home this time I was wearing stockings and things. I went to me mum and said, “what do you do with stockings mum, do you just put them in the washing machine?” And she went “just put them in with the blacks, dear”.” He laughs raucously. [1]
    Yet they all have a penchant for leather. Have they had any adverse reactions yet?
    Alan (Wilder, the cute, gentlemanly one): “We get more stick for that in England than anywhere else. We didn’t come across any aggressive rednecks in America. You get some businessmen in America shouting “faggots”, but very few compared to the carloads you get here shouting “pooftah”.”
    Andy: “I’m one of the most patriotic people going, and even I’ve changed my mind a bit about British broadmindedness.”
    Are any Dep fans taking a lead from their newly acquired sartorial leatherness?
    Andy: “I don’t think they do it as much now. Most of our fans wear Pringles. They follow the general fashion of the country. In Germany, because the general fashion is futurist, or poppers I think they call them, we do influence more there.”
    Isn’t it strange, all these Pringle boys coming to see you leather ‘n’ chains merchants?
    Alan: “You can get away with so much more in this lark, people accept it.”
    Martin: “Andy was saying to me the other day, you wouldn’t dress like that if you were still working for the bank. It’s not even a question of getting away with it so much now, it’s more a question of broadening people’s minds. After a while they accept you as being totally normal dressing like that, so they must be subtly changing their attitudes towards dress, cos most dress is very boring. I really notice it when I come back to England after being away for a while. I walk around Basildon town centre and there’s no style at all.”
    Five years is a long time in rock ‘n’ roll and Depeche Mode have not only survived, but improved immeasurably. And they haven’t really changed – they’re real general guys who’ll buy their round in the pub with the rest of them. Still, they’re not quite like the rest of the pop whirl. Alan flashes a snapshot of Martin in Japan dressed in a Japanese schoolgirl’s uniform; Andy says he never listens to music and Dave just wants to get home to do a bit of gardening. As in the words of the song: “I ask myself / should it be a sin [sic] / to be flexible / when the boat comes in?” Adaptable futurists survive; so say all of us.

[1] - For more on Martin and his taste in clothes, try this article.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #33 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:33:59 »
1985-05-25 - No.1 (uk) - alan wilder the band boy

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]






ALAN WILDER: THE BAND BOY
[No. 1, 25th May 1985. Pictures: Uncredited.]
" My god, this is raking up some history. "
Summary: Final part of a series allowing each band member to speak for themselves on whatever takes their fancy. Sadly, the editor tries to give Alan's words a controversial edge that isn't there, as Alan is mainly talking about his pre-Depeche years, and time recording at Hansa. Taken for what it is this turns up some very interesting facts - did you know he lived in Bristol for two years? [1149 words]
Also in this magazine were lyrics to Shake The Disease, with accompanying photo.

    Alan Wilder is ‘the musician’ in Depeche Mode. Ironically, that counted against him when they joined, as the others still wanted to prove they could get along without Vince Clarke. In the last of our interviews, Alan talks about his struggle to fit into the Mode, and the way the group balance stardom with anonymity. [1]
    Unlike the others who are from Basildon – or Bas as they call it – I’m from Acton, West London and was brought up in a fairly normal middle class environment.
    I went to St Clement Dane’s Grammar in Hammersmith, a good school but I wasn’t interested in being a student. I got three O-levels in arty subjects.
    I liked music and languages and I was forced to have piano lessons and do grades. That has been useful because I suppose you could say I’m the musician in the band – even though musical training isn’t the most important thing to Depeche Mode. It’s just an added advantage.
    I’ve got two elder brothers who are both classically trained. One is an accompanist who works with singers; he’s excellent. The other is teaching in Finland.
    I left school during the sixth form and went on the dole until my parents pushed me into writing off to recording studios, the only thing I’d expressed an interest in.
    After being turned down 40 times I got a job at DJM Studios in New Oxford Street. I was a tea boy, really, an over-worked gofer, but I did meet the Rubettes once. Wow!
    The only good thing about DJM was that when bands finished studio sessions they’d often leave their instruments behind so I could muck about on a keyboard or bash some drums.
    It was an ambition to be a musician but not one I thought would come true until a band called The Dragons came in. We became friendly, I ended up joining them and moved to Bristol.
    That was a pre-punk, soft rock group, nothing special, but I did gigs and we made a single. I can’t even remember what it was called. [2]
    After two years in Bristol, life got too lethargic so I was glad when a friend dragged me home to join a band called Daphne And The Tenderspots. My god, this is raking up some history. That was a restaurant type group playing jazz blues until it was decided that New Wave was happening.
    We had all these terrible clothes made and worse skinny ties. We were awful but again we had a deal and made a single, ‘Disco Hell’. I shouldn’t be telling you this!
MAKING IT
    After various other bands like The Hitmen, I was in my customary state – broke, bored and leafing through the classifieds in the Maker. [3] I saw an ad which said “Known Band seek synth player. Must be under 21.” I applied for the audition but I had to lie because I was 22.
    I went to two auditions before landing the job. Most of the people they’d had were either no-hopers or fans who’d learnt the hits off by heart, which they didn’t want.
    Actually, I had mixed feelings about Depeche. I was aware of ‘Just Can’t Get Enough’ and ‘New Life’, the two hits before Vince left, but I thought they were a bit wimpy – understandable at the time.
    On the other hand they were charming and friendly and the music was simple. I could appreciate that. I did think it would be better if they had more bollocks but I was careful not to tell them that. I just said, “I think you’re OK”.
    I was taken on in Depeche on a trial basis. They were quite shocked to have lost Vince so quickly, he was after all the main songwriter. My function was to do live work and TV appearances but not to be on any records for six months.
    This was in 1982. When the second LP came to be made, I’d done my final bit and thought I warranted involvement. I had something to contribute. Still they said no.
    The problem was that they had something to prove to themselves. The three of them didn’t want the press to say they’d just roped in a musician to make things easier after Vince left.
NEW LIFE
    Our lifestyle is so busy that it revolves almost totally around the group. I enjoy photography as a hobby and I’ve got a video camera I use on tour to document what we do. It’s fun to see yourself in a different light. [4]
    I don’t feel like a pop star although I’m aware of certain pressures on the road. We are pop stars by definition, but god knows what that means.
    Studio work interests me more than live appearances, which are basically louder reproductions of records. We aren’t an improvising band.
    Dave comes into his own with a crowd because he’s learnt how to develop an act. He does it well, especially on a good night. He’s also very tongue-in-cheek, he sends up the way a rock star is supposed to behave. In the early days we just stood in a line and played.
TECHNOPOP
    When I listen to Vince’s songs I realise he based them on blues and classic heavy metal riffs. We do nick bits from pop styles, from girl groups and surf music.
    It isn’t as political as some people make out, nor are we solely interested in electronic music. I like German bands – D.A.F., Kraftwerk, Tangerine Dream – but I’m not keen on the Howard Jones approach where everything sounds very nice but too easy and familiar.
    With a Depeche Mode song the first thing we decide upon is atmosphere. After that we might add sampled sounds. They could be anything. Pebbles in a can or industrial noises using oil cans, skips, concrete…
    All the technology we use is computer based but our interest is in what you can do with that, not how it works. There’s no reason to be scared of computer technology. People blame technology for musical sterility but that’s rubbish. It comes down to ideas.
    We record in Hansa, West Berlin because it’s ideal for what we need. It’s become more popular since we’ve been there. It used to be an empty four-storey block of studios – now Killing Joke use it and David Sylvian.
    Everything is computerised, which is what we’ve come to rely on. There’s a good working atmosphere in the city. Martin lives nearby in Heerstrasse.
    There’s plenty to do in Berlin. When you finish working at 4.00 a.m. you never feel like going to bed and so you end up in a bar or a club. DNC is a favourite, there’s a couple of good gay clubs, Corelles is alright, the Jungle…
    We don’t get bothered when we go out in Berlin – or anywhere else particularly. We are still quite a faceless band. I think that’s fairly healthy.
[1] - This is what I was referring to in the summary. As for 'struggling' to fit in, there is one paragraph where Alan states the others held back from taking him on as they wanted to prove they weren't helpless without Vince - something the other three have consistently acknowledged. It's hardly the battle of wills implied in the opening. In fact, Alan seems quite out of character in several places in this interview, coming across as a bit of a victim. Going by other interviews of his this is something he just doesn't tend to do, so I can't help but think his original words have been clumsily or irresponsibly edited. While heavy editing is always going to happen with pieces like this, it's usually - the other interviews in this series included - done less obtrusively.
[2] - Thanks to the excellent Recoil website www.recoil19.net I can tell you it was called Misbehavin'.
[3] - Alan has cut to the chase a bit here: at some point circa 1980 Alan was a session musician for The Korgis, and was a member of another band in 1980-1981, Real To Real.
[4] - Funnily enough, I've got a video of ancient DM clips taken from various TV programmes, including one early home video of Martin singing with a banjo. Now, I just wonder...
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #34 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:34:27 »
1985-05-28 - SFB (Germany) - Mitten Drin und Voll Daneben

Shake The Disease: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NWZXsNmfby8

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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #35 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:35:25 »
1985-05-30 - Bravo (Germany) - Martin Gore von Depeche Mode: Drunter trägt er Strapse!

[Taken from the now-defunct website dave-gahan.net. I typed out the text:]



Martin Gore von Depeche Mode: Drunter trägt er Strapse!

Die Fans stürzten sich natürlich wieder nur auf Martin Gore. Wo immer das britische Synthi-Quartett Depeche Mode jetzt auch auftaucht, der blonde Songschreiber der Gruppe ist sofort eingekesselt. Nicht nur, weil Martin sich mit seinen Bewunderern perfekt auf Deutsch unterhalten kann, sondern weil der Wahl-Berliner auch klamottenmäßig ständig heiße Gags auf Lager hat. Seine Mädchenklamotten stammten anfangs von Freundin Christine. Inzwischen nicht mehr. "Ich habe in USA jede Menge Fotos von Billy Idol gesehen", verrät der Keyboarder, "das hat mich richtig angemacht." Also besorgte sich Martin sofort im nächsten Laden ein ganzes Sortiment künstlicher Perlenketten, hängte sich ein Straß-Kreuz um den Hals und kaufte sich noch einen schwarzen abgeschnittenen Handschuh dazu. Mit dem knappen Lederwestchen und dem hochgeschorenen Blondschopf wäre das schon fast perfekt gewesen, aber Martin treibt es noch weiter: Seine Füße stecken in schwarzen Knobelbecher-Stiefeln, anstatt Hose trägt er einen geschlitzten Lederrock und drunter eine rote Strumpfhose. "Ich finde es einfach langweilig, so rumzulaufen wie alle anderen", kommentiert er gelassen sein Outfit, "außerdem habe ich mir sagen lassen, daß Röcke für Männer jetzt modern werden." Die schärfste Szene von Martins Klamotten-Arie sehen aber nur Freunde und Eingeweihte, wenn der 23jährige manchmal aus Spaß sein Röckchen hebt. Drunter trägt er nämlich einen weißen Tanga und schwarze Rüschen-Strapse. Übrigens: Schwul ist er garantiert nicht!

[Translated by me:]

Martin Gore of Depeche Mode: Underneath he is wearing suspenders!

Of course, the fans rushed only towards Martin Gore. Wherever the British synth quartet Depeche Mode shows up, the blond songwriter of the group is immediately surrounded. Not just because Martin can speak fluent German with his admirers, but because the converted Berliner constantly has hot tricks up his sleeve, clothingwise. His girl-clothes initially came from girlfriend Christine. But not anymore. "In the U.S. I saw many photos of Billy Idol", says the keyboardist, "which I really liked." So Martin immediately entered the nearest store to buy a whole range of fake pearl necklaces, and hung a Strasbourg cross around his neck and even bought a cut, black glove. With the tight leather jacket and highly cropped blond hair that would have been already perfect, but Martin pushes it even further: His feet have been stuck in black combat boots, and instead of pants he wears a split leather skirt and a red pantyhose underneath. "I just find it boring to walk around like everyone else", he says about his outfit, "besides, I've been told that skirts for men are becoming modern now." The hottest display of Martin's clothing collection can only be seen by friends and insiders, whenever the 23 year old sometimes lifts his skirt for fun. That's because, underneath, he wears a white thong and black, ruffled suspenders. By the way, he is definitely not gay!
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #36 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:35:51 »
1985-05-xx - MTV - MTV Popper (band interview)

Dentez is looking for this in better quality. Only a really tiny clip of it is online.



http://iconosquare.com/p/897406804836066851_345174456

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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #37 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:37:56 »
1985-05-xx - Keyboards magazin (Germany) - Interview Alan Wilder

[I bought it off the magazine's website. Transcribed using OCR:]




DEPECHE MODE
Entscheidend ist die musikalische Idee
Depeche Mode existieren seit ca. 3½ Jahren. In der Zwischenzeit sind vier Alben erschienen, die, wie auch die zwölf Singles, sich allesamt in den Charts placieren konnten. Neun Platten erreichten sogar die Top Twenty, People are People hieß z. B. der letzte Nr. 1-Hit in den bundesdeutschen Hit-Paraden.
Mittlerweile arbeitet die Band ausschließlich mit Synthesizern, als sie begannen, waren noch Zwei Gitarren mit von der Partie.
Ich kann mich noch schwach an einen Auftritt der damaligen Formation im Bridgehouse in Canning Town, das liegt im Londoner East-End, erinnern.
Dies ist auch deswegen ein bemerkenswerter Club, da er über ein eigenes Schallplatten-Label erfügt. So war er ein Sprungbrett für viele der heutigen englischen Topgruppen.
Es ist schade, daß der Club vor ca. zwei Jahren seine Pforten schloß…
K: Nach Aussagen der Platenfirma kann man Dich, Alan Wilder, als den Hauptkeyboarder der Gruppe bezeichnen.
AW: Ich bin vielleicht der beste Keyboarder der Band, habe aber deswegen keine Führungsrolle inne.
Dazu muß gesagt werden, daß Keyboardspiel im eigentlichen Sinne bei uns gar nicht stattfindet. Das meiste davon programmieren wir und spielen es über den Computer ab, so daß eine eigene Keyboard-Spieltechnik überhaupt nicht notwendig ist.
K Hast Du eine musikalische Ausbildung erhalten?
AW: Ab dem 8. Lebensjahr erhielt ich klassischen Klavierunterricht, ich habe da auch ein paar Prüfungen bestanden, wobei ich mittlerweile das Interesse daran verloren habe. So war grundsätzlich mein Interesse an klassischer Musik nie sehr groß. Der Klavierunterricht gehörte mehr zur Familientradition. Als Teenager gab ich die Sache auch dran und beschäftigte mich zu Hause am Piano lieber mit Pop-Musik. Dann bekam ich einen Job in einem Tonstudio, spielte bei ein paar unbekannten Bands, bis ich schließlich bei Depeche Mode landete.
K: Du has die Band nicht gegründet?
AW: Ich bin vor ca. drei Jahren eingestiegen, da war die Band schon eineinhalb Jahre zusammen.
K: Hatte die Band schon Charterfolge zu verzeichnen gehabt als Du dazukamst?
AW: Es gab zwei Singles, „New Life und Just Can‘t Get Enough, welche sich beide in den Charts placieren konnten. Als ich einstieg, verließ Vince Clark gerade die Band. Er spielt nun bei The Assembly.
K: Wie arbeitet Ihr mir Synthesizern und computer. Welche Art von Equipment benutzt ihr und warum?
AW: Das hauptsächlich eingesetzte Keyboard im Studiobereich ist das Synclavier, was unserem Co-Produzenten Daniel Miller gehört.
Wir haben noch eine ganze Menge anderer Instrumente, wie z. B. den Emulator II, die wir aber nur live einsetzen. Darüber hinaus benutze ich den Emulator zu Hause, um musikalische Ideen auszuprobieren oder mal ein paar Sounds zu samplen. Im Studio kommt nur das Synclavier in Frage. Die Aufnahmequalität des Synclaviers ist ungleich besser als bei allen anderen Instrumenten.
Darüber hinaus muß man feststellen, daß die Möglichkeiten, die das Synclavier von der Aufnahmetechnik bis hin zur Soundmodifikation bietet, viel größer sind als bei irgendeinem anderen Musikcomputersystem. Es klingt unglaublich naturgetreu. Hinzu kommt, daß die Software laufend weiterentwickelt wird. Wenn wir einen neuen Song aufnehmen wollen, dann gehen wir irgendwo in ein Demostudio und geben ein Großteil der musikalischen und rhythmischen Parts ein, spielen dazu, verändern usw.
Wir überarbeiten und überdenken die Programme so oft wie möglich, klanglich wie musikalisch. Wir wollen im Studio keine Zeit verlieren. Wenn die eigentliche Aufnahme beginnt, ist alles bestens vorbereitet. Die Sache beginnt mit der Aufnahme eines Click-Tracks und eines SMPTE-Codes. Dafür verwenden wir den Synchronizer von Friendchip, ein Gerät, welches verschiedene Drumcomputer, Synthesizer etc. synchronisiert.
An und für sich sollte man erwarten können, daß heutzutage keine Synchronisationsprobleme mehr auftreten. Aber ich muß sagen, daß wir ständig mit Schwierigkeiten in dieser Hinsicht zu kämpfen haben.
Letztendlich sind wir immer froh, wenn alle Probleme gelöst sind.
Nach dem Click-Track nehmen wir ein paar Guide-Parts oder Arbeitsspuren auf, eventuell gekoppelt mit den bereits vorprogrammierten Teilen.
Im Laufe der Produktion wird natürlich vieles verändert, manches auch kurz bevor wir fertig sind. Wie gesagt werden fast alle Parts vom Synclavier übernommen, außer, daß wir einen bestimmten Klang suchen, den ein anderer Synthesizer erzeugen kann. Der ARP 2600 hat ein paar einzigartige Klänge, die kein anderes Instrument hervorbringen kann.
K: So arbeitet Ihr ansonsten ausschließlich mir digitalen Klängen?
AW: Ja, sonst nur Digitalklänge.
K: Ich möchte ja doch mal ganz gerne herausfinden, wie sich manche Keyboarder zu der Diskussion um analoge contra digitale Klänge stellen.
Da gibt es die eine Gruppe von Leuten, die analoge Klänge bevorzugt, weil sie voller klingen und nicht so steril.
Stimmst Du dem zu unter dem Hintergrund, daß Ihr auch den ARP 2600 einsetzt?
AW: Da geht ja das Gerücht um, daß digitale Sounds zu steril seien sollen. Steve Levine, der mit Culture Club zusammenarbeitet, nimmt alles clean und digital auf und so klingt es dann auch. Aber das ist nicht das, was wir wollen. Wenn wir mit digitalen Klängen arbeiten, dann schicken wir sie über Verstärker oder PA-Komponenten und nehmen den Raumklang mit auf.
Wir bearbeiten die Klänge eben so, daß sie absolut nicht mehr steril klingen.
K: Das funktioniert so wie bei den Heavy Metal-Gruppen vor ein paar Jahren, die auf diese Art und Weise den Heavy-Metal-Klang noch „heavier“ gestalten wollten.
AW: Manchmal wird die Diskussion um Klänge und Klangquellen auch überbewertet. Eigentlich ist es doch völlig gleichgültig, ob man analoge oder digitale Klänge benutzt, ob man Gitarre spielt oder Synthesizer.
Entscheidend ist die musikalische Idee und der Song. Der Song ist für uns das Wichtigste und das wird auch so bleiben. Natürlich wollen wir mit ungewöhnlichen Klängen arbeiten und weniger mit konventionellen.
Aber das Argument, daß dieser Anspruch die Musikalität abtötet, ist doch ganz einfach falsch, wenn man bedenkt, daß der Mensch doch diese Ideen programmieren muß. Solange der Computer nicht selbst komponiert, sich selbst programmiert und das Stück auch noch selbst ausführt, solange besteht keine Gefahr, daß die Computer die Musik entmenschlichen.
K: Zurück zu den Keyboards. Siehst Du die Zukunft in einem Instrument, daß alle notwendigen Features in einem Gerät vereint, daß über das Anschlagsgefühl eines Flügels verfügt, digitale, analoge und gesamplte Klänge hervorbringen kann?
AW: Ich glaube so ein Keyboard existiert bereits. Es gibt eine neue Tastatur für das Synclavier, welches ich aber noch nicht gesehen habe, es soll den Anschlag eines Flügels besitzen. Ich weiß nicht, ob es stimmt.
Der neue Emulator II hat einen ganz passablen Anschlag und ist auch dynamisch spielbar...
Ich glaube, daß das, was Du von einem Keyboard verlangst, bereits Wirklichkeit ist.
K: Es läßt sich also festhalten, daß Du mit der Entwicklung im Keyboardbereich zufrieden bist?
AW: Das ist richtig. Nun muß ich dazu sagen, daß wir uns in einem Bereich betätigen, der zu meinem Erstaunen noch nicht von sehr vielen Keyboardern genutzt wird, nämlich das Soundsampling.
Wenn man mal auf die Entwicklung in den letzten 30 Jahren zurückblickt, stellt man fest, daß Gitarre, Baß und Schlagzeug eine dominante Rolle gespielt haben. Die Sampling-Keyboards ermöglichen eine total neue Soundqualität. Klänge, die bis dahin nicht realisierbar waren. Ich finde dies faszinierend und verwunderlich zugleich, daß nicht mehr Bands sich damit befassen. Ein Grund liegt sicherlich darin, daß die Geräte sehr teuer sind und sich nicht jeder Musiker die Anschaffung leisten kann. Aber es gibt trotzdem Musiker, die das Geld dazu haben, aber nicht darauf zurückgreifen. Das finde ich etwas enttäuschend.
K: Hast Du den Computer schon mal als Kompositionsinstrument benutzt, wie z. B. die entsprechenden Möglichkeiten des Fairlight probiert?
AW: Um ehrlich zu sein, ich habe noch nie einen Fairlight gespielt und so kenne ich mich auch mit den Möglichkeiten nicht aus. Soll ein Computer selbst komponieren, dann geht das doch wohl nur über Zufallsfunktionen. Wir haben dies schon häufig ausprobiert, nur um mal zu sehen, was herauskommt, wenn man dann die Taktarten verändert usw. Manchmal entsteht da schon etwas Brauchbares. Dies ist schon eine interessante Variante. Aber ich weiß nicht, ob mehr als nur „Versuch und Irrtum“ möglich ist.
K: Hast du schon einmal daran gedacht, geometrische oder mathematische Vorlagen für Deine Kompositionen zu verwenden?
AW: Nein, daran habe ich noch nie gedacht. Wir haben nur mal damit experimentiert, uns von der abendländischen Harmonielehre zu lösen und auch Vierteltöne einzusetzen. Da erhält die Musik mehr einen asiatischen Charakter.
Da wir aber immer sehr songorientiert arbeiten, können wir nicht zu sehr nach dem Zufallsprinzip arbeiten.
K: Siehst Du die Verwendung traditioneller Songstrukturen als ein Erfolgsrezept an?
AW: Martin, der die meisten unserer Titel schreibt, legt großen Wert auf den Song und die Melodie. Wenn es ins Studio geht, dann geht er in der oben beschriebenen Arbeitsweise vor. Er hat ein Händchen für Melodien. Dies kommt uns natürlich zugute. Es gibt viele Leute, die mit Klängen experimentieren und auch interessante Aufnahmen erstellen können, nach einer gewissen Zeit tritt eine Hörmüdigkeit ein. Wenn dann kein gutes Songkonzept dahinter steht, wird es schnell langweilig. Die Kombination eines guten Songs mit einem guten Text und guter, moderner Sounds ist wohl die richtige Mischung für einen neuen Titel.
K: Wo entstehen Eure Stücke, auf dem Klavier, der Gitarre oder dem Synthesizer?
AW: Unsere Kompositionstechnik ist sehr konventionell. Martin schreibt die Stücke auf einer akustischen Gitarre. Akkorde und Melodie, dann ist das Grundkonzept schon fertig!
Ich gehe ähnlich vor, fange manchmal mit einem rhythmischen Pattern an, es ist an sich kein besonderer oder festgelegter Vorgang.
Milton Reame James

[Translation by me:]

DEPECHE MODE
Decisive is the musical idea
Depeche Mode exist for about 3½ years. In the meantime, four albums were released, which, like the twelve singles, were all placed in the charts. Nine records even reached the top twenty, for instance People are People was the latest No. 1 hit in the West German hit-parades.
Nowadays, the band is working exclusively with synthesizers, but when they began, two guitars were involved.
I can still vaguely remember a performance of that formation at the Bridge House in Canning Town, situated in London's East End.
The club is also remarkable because it included an independent record label. It was a foundation for many of today's English top acts.
It is a pity that the club closed its doors about two years ago...
K: According to the record company, you, Alan Wilder, can be called the principal keyboardist of the group.
AW: I am perhaps the best keyboardist in the band, but I do not hold any role of a leader.
It must be said that keyboard playing does not take place with us in the real sense. We programme most of it and play it from the computer, so your own keyboard performance technique is not necessary.
K Have you had musical education?
AW: Since I was 8, I was taught classical piano lessons, I have passed a few tests, but I have now lost interest. Basically, my interest in classical music was never really that big. The piano belonged more to the family tradition. When I was a teenager, I gave up on the whole thing and at home on the piano I rather occupied myself with pop music. Then I got a job at a recording studio, played with a few unknown bands, until I ended up with Depeche Mode.
K: You have not formed the band?
AW: I joined about three years ago, as the band was already together for one and a half years.
K: Did the band already have chart successes when you joined?
AW: There were two singles, "New Life" and "Just Can't Get Enough", both of which entered the charts. When I joined, Vince Clark had just left the band. He is now playing with The Assembly.
K: How do you work the synthesizers and computer. What kind of equipment do you use and why?
AW: The keyboard that is used mainly in the studio is the Synclavier, which is from our co-producer Daniel Miller.
We still have a lot of other instruments, such as the emulator II, but we only use that live. In addition, I use the emulator at home to try out musical ideas or to just sample some sounds. In the studio, only the Synclavier comes into play. The recording quality of the Synclaviers is far better than any other instruments.
In addition, it should be noted that the possibilities provided by the Synclavier recording technology for sound modification, are much larger than any other musical computer system. It sounds incredibly natural. Moreover, the software is continually evolving. When we want to record a new song, then we'll go somewhere into a demo studio and enter a lot of the musical and rhythmic parts into the computer, play with them, change them, etc.
We revise and rethink the programmes as often as possible, sonically and musically. We don't want to lose any time in the studio. If the actual recording starts, everything is well prepared. It starts with the recording of a click track and a SMPTE code. We use the Synchronizer from Friend Chip, a device which synchronises various drum machines, synths etc..
By now you would think that no more sync problems are to be expected. But I must say that in this regard we are constantly struggling with difficulties.
Ultimately, we are always happy when all problems are solved.
After the click track we take on a few labour tracks or guide parts, possibly coupled with the already pre-programmed parts.
During the production much is changed of course, some just right before we are finished. As I said, almost all parts are taken from the Synclavier, except when we are looking for a certain sound, which another synthesizer can produce. The ARP 2600 has a few unique sounds that no other instrument can produce.
K: So you basically work only with digital sounds?
AW: Yes, usually only digital sounds.
K: I'd like to find out how some keyboardists feel about the discussion of analogue versus digital sound.
Because there is a group of people who prefer the analog sound because it sounds more full and not sterile.
Do you agree with them, considering you use the ARP 2600?
AW: There is indeed the rumour going around that digital sounds are too sterile. Steve Levine, who works with Culture Club, records everything clean and digitally and so then it sounds as such. But that's not what we want. When we work with digital sounds, then we will send them through amplifiers or PA components and also record the surround sound.
We edit the sounds just so that they no longer sound absolutely sterile.
K: This works just like in the heavy metal groups a few years ago, this way they wanted to make the heavy metal sound "heavier".
AW: Sometimes the discussion of sounds and sound sources is also overrated. Actually, it's completely irrelevant whether you use analogue or digital sounds, if you play guitar or synthesizer.
Decisive is the musical idea and the song. The song is the most important thing for us and that will remain so. Of course we want to work more with unusual sounds and less with conventional ones.
But the argument that this approach kills musicality is simply false when you consider that you still have to programme these ideas yourself. As long as the computer itself is not composing, programming and also performing it, then there is no danger that the computer will dehumanise music.
K: Back to Keyboards. Do you see in the future an instrument that combines all necessary features into one unit that has the touch and feel of a grand piano and can produce digital, analogue and sampled sounds?
AW: I think such a keyboard already exists. There is a new keyboard for the Synclavier, which I have not seen it yet, it should have the strike of a piano. I do not know if it's true.
The new emulator II has an almost perfect strike and is also dynamically playable...
I think that what you ask of a keyboard is already reality.
K: It can be stated, therefore, that you are satisfied with the development in the field of keyboards?
AW: That's right. Now I must say that we operate in an area that to my astonishment is not yet used by many keyboardists, namely sound sampling.
If you look back at the development in the last 30 years, you realise that guitar, bass and drums have played a dominant role. The sampling keyboards allow a totally new sound quality. Sounds that were previously not feasible. I find this fascinating and at the same time surprising that bands are not working with it more. One reason is certainly the fact that the devices are very expensive and not every musician can afford to buy it. But there are still musicians who have the money to do so, but do not rely on it. I find that a bit disappointing.
K: Have you ever used the computer as a compositional tool, such as trying the respective capabilities of the Fairlight for example?
AW: To be honest, I've never played a Fairlight and so I am not familiar with its possibilities. If a computer is composing out of its own, then that's surely just random functions. We have already tried this often, just to see what comes out when you change the time signatures and so on. Sometimes something useful arises. This is in itself an interesting variation. But I do not know if more than "trial and error" is possible.
K: Have you ever thought of using geometric or mathematical templates for your compositions?
AW: No, I've never thought of that. We have only experimented sometimes with stepping away from the Western harmony and also with using quarter tones. The music gets more of an Asian character then.
But since we always work very song-oriented, we can not work too much at random.
K: Do you see the use of traditional song structures as a recipe for success?
AW: Martin, who writes most of our tracks, puts great importance to the song and the melody. When it comes to the studio, he's moving in the way as I just described. He has a knack for melodies. This benefits us, of course. There are many people who experiment with sounds and can thus create interesting recordings, but after a certain period there comes a fatigueness of sound. If no good song concept is behind it, it gets boring. The combination of a good song with a good text and good, modern sounds is probably the right mix for a new track.
K: Where are your pieces created? On the piano, the guitar or the synthesiser?
AW: Our composition technique is very conventional. Martin writes the songs on an acoustic guitar. Chords and melody, then the basic concept is already done!
I proceed similarly, sometimes start with a rhythmic pattern, in itself it is no special or fixed process.
Milton Reame James
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #38 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:38:50 »
1985-05-xx - Muziek Express (Netherlands) - Depeche Mode gaat vóór!




[Photo found on eBay.com. Transcribed/translated by me.]

"Wie is er belangrijker," vroegen Martin's makkers, "de groep of je vriendin?"...
Depeche Mode gaat vóór!

Ze moesten hem aan zijn haren meesleuren. Het liefste was de smoorverliefde Martin Gore voor altijd in Berlijn, bij zijn vriendin Christina gebleven. Maar uiteindelijk bezweek de 23-jarige krullebol tòch onder de druk van zijn Depeche Mode-collega's...

"Nee, nee, nee, ik wil niet!", lacht Martin Gore. "Zó moet het ongeveer geklonken hebben, denk ik." Met een rode blos op zijn wangen vertelt de 23-jarige toetsenman van Depeche Mode zijn verhaal. Zijn liefdesverhaal, wel te verstaan. De blonde krullebol staat niet bepaald bekend als een kletsmajoor, maar over de onmoeting met zijn kersverse vriendin Christina praat Martin vrolijk honderd uit. Over hun eerste afscheid is de sympathiek Martin echter een stuk dramatischer: "Ik heb echt gehuild, en mijn hart leek op slag stil te staan, toen Andy me in paniek opbelde. Hij zei dat de jongens al meer dan een uur op me stonden te wachten op het vliegveld van Berlijn. Ik moest onmiddellijk komen, anders zouden ze zonder mij terugvliegen naar London. Maar ik wilde helemaal niet terug naar Engeland. Ik wilde bij Christina blijven, we hadden zo'n fantastische week gehad!" Nee, echt leuk was het ook niet voor de twee tortelduifjes. Vlak voordat Depeche Mode de laatste opname voor hun elpee 'Some Great Reward' beëindigd had, ontmoette de knappe toetsenist zijn grote liefde: Christina! "Toen ik Chris in die Berlijnse discotheek zag staan, was ik meteen smoorverliefd op haar. Ze zag er betoverend uit. Bovendien was ze niet zo opdringering als de meeste meisjes zijn, wanneer ze in de gaten hebben dat er een bekende popgroep in de buurt is." Gelukkig voor Martin was hij niet de enige met vlinders in de buik, want ook Christina liep die avond met hetzelfde gevoel rond. "Nadat we een paar keer uit eten waren geweest, en ik al een paar avonden in Christina's kleine flatje had doorgebracht, wist ik het gewoon helemaal zeker: Christina is het helemaal voor mij!" Maar na een week kwam er abrupt een einde aan het sprookje van Martin en Christina. De opnamen waren afgerond, en Depeche Mode had niets meer in Berlijn te zoeken. Althans Andy, David en Alan niet. "Ik had er juist álles te zoeken. Maar ja, natuurlijk moest ik ook mee terug naar Londen, want daar zouden we de elpee afmixen. Het afscheid deed echt verschrikkelijk veel pijn maar we beloofden elkaar zo snel mogelijk weer te zien", zegt Martin zichtbaar geëmotioneerd. "Het heeft uiteindelijk meer dan vier maanden geduurd voordat ik Chris weer zag. Toen we met de groep overlegden waar onze nieuwe single zou worden opgenomen, heb ik gesmeekt om dat in Berlijn te laten gebeuren. En je ziet het, hè? Eindelijk zit ik weer hier. Ik heb al mijn spullen meegenomen, en ik ben niet van plan óóit nog afscheid van Christina te nemen. Als we op toernee gaan, neem ik Chris gewoon mee. Maar voorlopig blijf ik hier in Berlijn. Al wachten de jongens een maand op het vliegveld! Sterker nog: en al dreigen ze me uit de groep te zetten, hahaha..."

Foto's:
"Chris en ik houden van mooie, strakke dingen", vertelt Martin.
"We hebben ons flatje samen ingericht. Functioneel en toch sfeervol!"
Martin Gore is smoorverliefd op zijn Christina. Voor háár verhuisde hij naar het verre Berlijn.


Translation:

"Who is more important," Martin's buddies asked, "the group or your girlfriend?"...
Depeche Mode comes first!

They were dragging him by the hair. The lovesick Martin Gore would have preferred to stay with his girlfriend Christina in Berlin forever. But eventually the 23-year-old curlyhead succumbed to the pressure of his Depeche Mode colleagues...

"No, no, no, I don't want to!", laughs Martin Gore. "This is how it probably sounded, I think." With a red blush on his cheeks, the 23-year-old keyboardist of Depeche Mode tells his story. His love story, to be precise. The blonde curly head is not exactly known as a chatterbox, but Martin talks eleboratedly and cheerfully about the encounter with his new girlfriend Christina. The sympathetic Martin turns more dramatic, however, when talking about their first farewell: "I really had to cry, and my heart immediately seemed to stop when Andy phoned me in a panic. He said the boys had been waiting for me at the airport in Berlin for over an hour. I had to appear immediately, otherwise they would fly back to London without me. But I did not want to return to England. I wanted to stay with Christina, we had such a great week!" No, it wasn't really fun for the two lovebirds. Right before Depeche Mode had ended the last recording of their LP 'Some Great Reward', the handsome keyboardist met his great love: Christina! "When I saw Chris in that Berlin discotheque, I was immediately smitten by her​. She looked magical. Moreover, she was not as pushy like most girls who notice that there's a well-known rock band around." Fortunately for Martin, he was not the only one having butterflies in their stomach, because Christina was having the same feeling that night. "After we had been out for dinner a few times and I had already spent a few nights in Christina's tiny apartment, I just knew for certain: Christina is the one for me!" But, after a week, an abrupt ending came to the story of Martin and Christina. The recordings had been finished, and Depeche Mode had no business to do in Berlin anymore. At least not Andy, David and Alan. "I had an absolute whole lot of business to do there. But then again, of course I had to go back to London, because we were mixing the album there. Bidding farewell really brought us terrible pain but we promised to see each other as soon as possible," says Martin, visibly moved. "It ultimately took more than four months before I could see Chris again. When we were discussing in the group where to record our new single, I begged them to have it happen in Berlin. And you can see the result, don't you? Finally I'm staying over here again. I already brought over all my stuff, and I'm not planning to ever say goodbye to Christina. When we will go on tour, I'll take Chris with me. But for now, I'll stay here in Berlin. Even if that means the boys are waiting for me at the airport for a month! Better yet: even if they threaten to kick me out of the group, hahaha..."

Photos:
"Chris and I love beautiful, neat things," says Martin.
"We have decorated our apartment together. Functional yet stylish!"
Martin Gore is madly in love with his Christina. He moved to faraway Berlin for her.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #39 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:39:38 »
1985-05-xx - Poppis (Sweden) - Depeche Mode

[Thanks to Rome for sending a photo of this article! Rome only had the first page. The second page was shown on eBay, http://www.ebay.com/itm/Depeche-Mode-Yngwie-Malmsteen-Eddie-Van-Halen-Gary-Moore-clippings-Sweden-/111956068673, in two different sizes.]


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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #40 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:39:57 »
1985-05-xx - Unknown (??) - the Red hot club: Dave & Fletch (30 min)

[We don't have this audio interview.]



1985-05-xx - Rock Show (Japan) - Depeche Mode

[Photos found on eBay.]


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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #41 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:41:16 »
1985-05-xx - MTV (U.S.) - I.R.S. Records' The Cutting Edge

http://www.depechemode.com/video/television/thecuttingedge.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ii1N_5nWOiE



I.R.S. Records ran a one hour TV show on MTV in the 80's, hosted by Peter Zaremba. This particular episode of the monthly show featured an interview with the members of Depeche Mode. The graffiti artist (Chas) at the beginning of the clip was from the previous show segment.
Please excuse the time code (the numbers at the bottom of the screen) on the video clip. This is how the clip was supplied from MTV.

[I transcribed it:]

Dave: When you use electronics, you don't have to be technically, an excellent musician. You don't have to be able to technically play a guitar, and be a great guitar player, as in a lot of groups it's a battle of "who's the best", you know, and stuff like that, with musicians. With electronics, you can have good ideas.
Alan: I'll never understand the attitude that synthesisers don't produce real music as any instrument produces music. It's the people that produce the music, anyway. It's not the instrument, it's how you use the instrument, so, that's what important.
Andy: We don't use many synthesisers anymore, really. We use a lot of computers, which is different. Because with computers, you can make your own sounds, and with synths, it's just really electronically formulated sounds.
Martin: We still feel that the songs are the most important thing. Even though we used this Synclavier, and are doing things in a very sort of modern way, on our last album for instance, one of the tracks was just, like, an acoustic piano and vocal, because we felt that that song needed that sort of treatment. You know, we wouldn't like to restrict ourselves and say "We've got to record this song in this way". We're just interested in interpreting the songs in the best way possible.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #42 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:42:29 »
1985-05-xx - No.1 (UK) - STD Review

http://tiptopwebsite.com/websites/index2.php?username=depechemodefile&page=12

Depeche Mode's move from brittle electro-pop to lovingly crafted, haunting tracks has been quiet but sure. Though they never seemed to court mass popularity that's the position they've now found themselves in, but it hasn't stopped them making classic records.
'Shake The Disease' (a weird title which hardly appears in the lyrics) is a moody, melancholy track with a haunting chorus - it's deceptively simple but completely charming.
Unknown reviewer
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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #43 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:43:48 »
1985-05-xx - Unknown (Italy) - Domenica In (Shake The Disease)

Dentez has this in good quality. Not hosted online.

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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 1985: The Singles 81>85
« Reply #44 on: 20 June 2012 - 01:45:18 »
1985-06-01 - No.1 (UK) - Meanwhile back in Montreux...

http://www.zttaat.com/article.php?title=945



(...)

Still in Montreux, Frankie’s Nasher and Depeche Mode’s Martin Gore were intercepted running round hotel corridors, drinking Schnapps and throwing up next to fire extinguishers. And all this after various Frankies had been heard to say that they wouldn’t be seen dead with “the eye-line red ones” (Modey).

(...)
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