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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #15 on: 06 May 2013 - 23:27:11 »
2013-05-06 - Electronic Beats (Germany) - An interview with Dennis Burmeister

http://www.electronicbeats.net/2013/05/06/modekollector-an-interview-with-dennis-burmeister-depeche-superfan/

ModeKollector: An interview with Dennis Burmeister, Depeche superfan
Monday, May 06, 2013 in Interviews by EB Team about Depeche Mode

Dennis Burmeister is the über-collector of Depeche Mode memorabilia whose vast collection contains over 10,000 pieces and makes up the majority of our Depeche Mode Fan Exhibition. Growing up in East Germany, where DM had a huge and intensely loyal following, his access to editions and oddities particular to the territory formed the base of a 30-year accidental obsession culminating in exhibitions in four cities across Europe and a monograph book. We spoke with Dennis about the origins of the collection, his experiences as a Depeche Mode devotee, and get details of the exhibition from him and curator Martin Hossbach.

 

When did you first hear Depeche Mode? What song was it?

It’s hard to say exactly how and when I came to be a fan, but I do remember hearing “Pipeline” on the radio and thinking what an unusual song it was with all these sounds and samples—like the table tennis ball and the chanting sounds—and these crazy mixing effects. That was probably my first ‘lightbulb’ moment, although at that point I knew nothing about the band. It must have been 1983 or ’84.

Was that on East German radio?

I’m not sure, but I think it was on Western radio. At that time, we were listening to all sorts of music and recording it ourselves directly from the radio. There was this really big recording culture going on at that time.

But at that time it was illegal to listen to West German radio, right?

I can’t remember whether there were any regulations about the radio. We were doing all sorts of things at that time. A friend of mine used to go into the copy shop and photocopy pages out of Bravo magazine in postcard format, and then sell them openly around the city and no one gave him problems. There was also this TV program called Ronny’s Pop Show with a monkey with the voice of Otto Waalkes where I first saw video for “A Question Of Time”. That was in 1986 and probably my second lightbulb moment.

Would you say that the third lightbulb moment was when the Berlin Wall fell and you could finally buy all this stuff?

No. I was already buying things before. In mid-1987 there was a greatest hits album released in the East because they couldn’t agree on which studio album to release. The AMIGA compilation was a huge thing and I loved listen to songs like “Shake The Disease”, “It’s Called A Heart” or “Everything Counts”.

Was the greatest hits album put together just for East Germany or was it also released elsewhere?

I think the tracklist on that one was different and just for East Germany. They used the cover from The Singles 1981-85 but they changed around some of the songs. As I said, originally there were plans to release a studio album but there were financial limits to what they could do, and eventually it was decided to release a best of album. That was around April, 1987. I got a tape copy of that album at the time and I still have it. I actually stole it from the city library along with an Elvis tape.

You have a collection which now totals around 10,000 pieces. How did you manage to amass so much?

It grew over time. My friends and I used to swap tapes and things that like. I wasn’t just listening to Depeche Mode either. My dad was kind of a hippie and I grew up listening to the Stones and Beatles and Black Sabbath. He really tried to influence me musically. I had Shakin’ Stevens posters on my walls, but I didn’t put them up—he did! My dad was also really into music, so that sparked my interest, although my taste was different to his. I collected what I could get my hands on and what I couldn’t find in the East, I bought later after the fall of the Wall.

How did you find and buy things before eBay?

I just bought what I could find in record stores. There were record stores such as Cadillac that had pretty decent collections of electronic music, and that’s where I got a lot of my stuff. With the fall of the Wall, there was a massive surge in sales in the Eastern Bloc countries and you could see that in the stores. You could find everything back in those days. There wasn’t really any knowledge or interest in whether certain releases or pressings were rare, people were really just concerned about the quality of the music.

Did you also go to flea markets or things like that?

No. Sometimes there was a fun-fair in town, that had little stalls and was kind of like a flea market where you could find books and lot of second-hand items. They also sold records from the West there, but they were very expensive. A Stones record would cost 200 or 300 East German marks and that was just crazy when you look back at it today.

You have built up your collection because you’re intrigued by the music, but it’s more than just that. You’re also interested in pop culture beyond the music, correct?

Personally, it really annoys me that the same stories about the band get transported from one press article to another. They all seem to use the same ideas and same tone. Since 1996, there was this increased focus on the whole drug story and then it was all about gossip and grubby stories about the band, and I just wasn’t interested in any of that at all. For me, it was about more than just four musicians—there was the whole team at Mute Records. You could write a whole book about Daniel Miller, and the whole Mute or Intercord story. Today’s mp3 generation probably can’t imagine what Daniel Miller did with Mute in UK or Intercord records in Germany and then everything else that surrounded it. These sorts of stories were what really interested me and got me involved as a kind of music historian. The whole success story of Depeche Mode lies in so many fields, like Martin Gore’s texts or the awesome sleeve designs that the band produced.

Let’s talk a little about the book and then the exhibition. People are saying that this is the first extensive monograph about Depeche Mode. How did you come up with the idea for this project and who did you work with?

With regards to the idea, I have a pretty good relationship with Anne Haffmans from Mute Germany. Around 2000, I was working on a website with people who had close links to Mute, and that was all really nice and interesting having a direct view of how it all works. Anne is someone who has a genuine interest in fan stories and how fans create cultures around certain bands and build up collections. She was the first person to say to me that I should make a book out of all the information that I had gathered over the years.

I made the book together with an author and historian from Leipzig called Sascha Lange. In 2008, for the 20th anniversary, he tried to get a documentary about the concert in East Berlin on March 7th, 1988 off the ground. I met him in the offices of Mute, and he wanted to get a bit of material and information from me. He was also doing interviews, and he wanted me to be there when he interviewed the then-tour manager of Depeche Mode. So, Sascha and I quickly become friends and that’s how the whole thing started. We spoke about it for ages before actually getting our act together, and after speaking with friends eventually settled on the idea of putting it out through [publishers] Aufbau Verlag.

Would you say this exhibition is important and necessary because of the passion of Depeche Mode fans? There really isn’t any other pop phenomenon quite like it, particularly with relation to East Germany.

There had been ideas previously to put together such an exhibition, but the band had resisted anything like this because they didn’t see themselves as a band that should have an exhibition in a museum or anything like that.

I’d like to talk to about Depeche Mode on the internet. From the end of the 1990s, when the internet really took off, fan forums started to appear bringing together people from all over the world. Did this really give the fan community a new thrust?

Definitely. I first really noticed it when Exciter came out in 2001— on the official website, fans were being enticed with little snippets from songs, particularly the first single “Dream On”. That was the first time that I can think of where the internet was really used to promote a Depeche Mode album. The culture then grew really quickly. Today there are hardly any secrets anymore. Whenever anything happens, the band is in the studio or something like that, there are people who see them and take photos and put them on the internet straight away.

Do you have any explanation for why that is with Depeche Mode, even today? People who are constantly posting on the internet are likely to be younger than 40, and it sounds like these fan groups are really continuing to grow—writing blogs in different languages and everything. It kind of sounds like a popular football team where fans are constantly speculating about every injury and every potential new player that the club might buy.

The band members themselves don’t really say that much, so they’ve kind of left all of the space for discussion about the band to the fan community. There are smaller bands that don’t really do much promotion or anything like that and just let it happen over the internet, and it’s the same with Depeche Mode even though there is such a great interest in them. I have no idea why that is.

I’d be interested to know how you were able to choose the 500 pieces for the exhibition from a collection of 10,000 pieces.

Martin Hossbach: Funnily enough, Dennis wasn’t really much of a help, because it’s actually quite difficult when you’ve spent so much of your life collecting all this stuff to pick out a selection that gives a good reflection of the broader picture. That’s why you need someone like me to come in any make some decisions. I am personally a collector of Pet Shop Boys items and, although I have much less stuff than Dennis, I know that I would have difficulty knowing where to begin if I had to put on such an exhibition. We worked together with exhibition architects, who suggested that we do a mixed layout—with some sections like in a classic natural history museum with cabinets that allow people to take a closer look at individual items, and then have other sections as ‘scenes’, which would be built like film sets where items would be arranged as they would have been used. The scenes will only be at the Berlin exhibition on the ground floor. Due to financial and logistical issues we’ll only have the natural history style sections in the other cities of the tour. In Berlin, there will be two scenes; the first will be in a recording studio and the second will be in a record store. The record store is modelled on the legendary Rough Trade store in London and the studio is modelled on the Hansa Studios in Berlin, where Depeche Mode actually recorded. In the studio you can see an original Emulator, a sampler, one of Martin Gore’s guitars, and a range of other machines and other things that the band used. There are also listening stations where you can listen to Depeche Mode songs, including the first demo tape that the band recorded. The record store is put together to give an impression of how the marketing of the band and other behind-the-scenes work was done by the label.

After it was decided to do the exhibition in this format it was easier to decide what items to use from the collection, because we knew what the restrictions were. Dennis and I sat down for two days and thought about how we could narrow down this selection that includes everything from Russian bootleg flexi-discs to fanzines from various countries, remixes, tour programs, promo material, everything possible. In the end, it also came down to a question of taste—really just choosing certain items based on how they look aesthetically.

DB: The exhibition isn’t just aimed at hardcore fans and collectors; that’s why it was important to get Martin involved because he’s not so deep in this whole scene and could pick out items that would appeal to more people.

MH: I think that the quality and the real strength of the exhibition lies in the fact that even if you’re not interested in the music, you can still learn a lot about pop culture, marketing, promotion, graphic design, photography, and much more.

DB: It’s also really interesting to look at how many opportunities the band were given that new bands these days wouldn’t get. These days if one or two albums flop, then bands get chucked out the window. With Depeche Mode it was different, the record label believed in them and stuck with them. It was a typically Daniel Miller thing, understanding the basic idea of the band and its potential. You can really see how much love went into it all. It’s also, in parts, an intensely colorful journey back in time, which helps dispel this image of the band as being somehow gloomy. For me, Daniel Miller has been one of the most important people in the music business for decades.~

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #16 on: 09 May 2013 - 01:58:47 »
2013-05-08 - Zeit (Germany) - "Good evening, East Börlin"

http://www.zeit.de/2013/20/depeche-mode-ddr-fans

 Depeche Mode
"Good evening, East Börlin"

Als die DDR-Jugend Megafone stahl: Depeche Mode, die britische Band von Weltrang, hatte die treuesten Fans ausgerechnet hinter der Mauer.

Es gab nicht eine, sondern zwei Mauern für die Fans von Depeche Mode in der DDR. Denn die Band war doppelt unerreichbar. Sie waren Popstars, abgeschirmt von Bodyguards und getönten Autoscheiben, aber was viel schlimmer war: Sie lebten jenseits des Eisernen Vorhangs, und es gab keine Hoffnung, sie jemals auf einem Konzert zu sehen.

In der Regel kannten Jugendliche damals, Anfang der achtziger Jahre, höchstens zwei, drei Songs einer Band und das Outfit, den Style, bevor sie sich für ihre Lieblingsband entschieden. Besonders Frisuren und Kleidung kamen im Jahrzehnt des Pop entscheidende Bedeutung zu, und Depeche Mode mit ihren vier markanten Frisuren und schwarzen Lederklamotten waren allen einen Schritt voraus. Allerdings hätte der Stil nie überzeugt, wenn er nicht in einer so kongenialen Kombination mit der Musik gestanden hätte. Der poppige, großflächige Industrie-Sample-Sound erschuf eine völlig neue Klangwelt und war zu der Zeit absolutes Alleinstellungsmerkmal.

Auf vielen Fotos posierte die Band zu dieser Zeit vor Industrieanlagen, stellenweise mit schweren Vorschlaghämmern. Die graue Industrieästhetik war im Leben vieler Lehrlinge im Osten die tägliche Wirklichkeit. Denn sie schufteten in einem der vielen schmutzigen und heruntergekommenen metallverarbeitenden Betriebe. So entstand ein von der Band sicherlich nie beabsichtigter besonderer Bezug zwischen ihrer Ästhetik und den Lebensumständen der Jugendlichen in der DDR. Das half, sich die graue Realität im Osten bunter zu denken. "Im Industriegebiet von Leipzig-Plagwitz hatten wir unsere London Docks wie im Video von Shake The Disease", erinnert sich Depeche-Mode-Fan Stefan Kopielski aus Leipzig.

 Auf den Plattencovern von A Broken Frame und Construction Time Again arbeitete die Band mit Zeichen und Symbolen, die an die Kunstform des Sozialistischen Realismus der fünfziger und sechziger Jahre angelehnt waren: der arbeitende Mensch als Mittelpunkt und ästhetische Projektionsfläche. Den Fans in der DDR war klar, dass Depeche Mode damit keine Sympathien für stalinistischen Kulturschick zeigen wollten, sondern dies ein Verfahren der Pop-Art war: Im neuen Kontext verloren die Symbole den ideologischen Ballast und waren nun zuallererst Symbole von Depeche Mode. Aber das Beste war: Genau solche Bilder fanden sich im Osten zuhauf. Als 1987 auf Music For The Masses diese typischen Propaganda-Megafone abgebildet wurden und dann auch im Video zu Strangelove zu sehen waren, empfanden die Fans in der DDR dies erneut als Verweis auf die DDR-Realität. Als Folge wurden überall, in Betrieben und sogar auf Bahnhöfen, von Depeche-Mode-Fans Megafone geklaut, und diese, knallig rotorange angemalt, schmückten daraufhin diverse Jugendzimmer. In einem Fall in Leipzig ermittelte 1988 die Staatssicherheit gegen den Diebstahl, weil sie in ihrer grenzenlosen Paranoia den Missbrauch dieser Geräte für staatsfeindliche Propaganda befürchtete. Glücklicherweise wurden die "Täter" nie ermittelt.

Depeche Mode haben sich in der Öffentlichkeit stets als unpolitisch dargestellt. Doch ihre Alben von 1983 und 1984 setzten sich auch mit den zu dieser Zeit drängenden politischen Fragen der Umweltverschmutzung, Kapitalismuskritik und der Gefahr eines atomaren Krieges zwischen Ost und West auseinander. Die DDR-Jugendlichen, die eine der wenigen Ausstrahlungen des People Are People- Videos in der West-Musiksendung Formel Eins sahen, entdeckten dort Aufnahmen vom Roten Platz und eine künstlerische Beschäftigung mit dem Kalten Krieg.

Hier sang nicht die Propagandaabteilung des Klassenfeindes, sondern Depeche Mode als brothers in mind, und sie machten damit klar, dass sie, obwohl sie so weit entfernt waren, dieselben Ängste teilten. Besonders das Video zu Stripped hatte – von der Band und vom Regisseur Peter Care nicht gewollt – mit etwas Fantasie mehrere Anspielungen auf die DDR: den Blick auf die Berliner Mauer, die Zerstörung eines russischen Lada-Kombis mit Vorschlaghämmern und vernebelte Industriebrachen, die im Osten in jedem Ort zu finden waren. Ohne es zu beabsichtigen, lieferten Depeche Mode auf diese Weise den DDR-Fans sowohl einen lebensnahen Soundtrack als auch die Projektionsfläche für Sehnsüchte einer ganzen Generation.

Das Zusammenstellen des Outfits war eine anspruchsvolle Herausforderung. Es gab in der DDR keine Szenegeschäfte mit entsprechenden Klamotten. Do-it-Yourself war das Gebot der Zeit, obgleich kaum jemand im Osten diese vom Punk geprägte Parole kannte. Das Auftauchen von neuen Bildern der Band oder Auftritte in westlichen TV-Shows lösten regelmäßig Stürme auf DDR-Kleidungsstücke aus, die denen der Band irgendwie ähnelten. Die Kleiderschränke der Großväter wurden nach langen Sechziger-Jahre-Mänteln und alten Lederjacken durchforstet, die eigenen Klamotten schwarz gefärbt, billige schwarze Arbeitsschutzschuhe mit Profilsohlen auf Hochglanz poliert, damit sie wie Doc Martens aussahen. Trug Dave auf einem Poster ein graues Jackett, stibitzten Hunderte Dave-Klone in der DDR im nächsten Moment den Vätern ein farbgleiches aus dem Schrank. Schmückte Martin seine Lederjacke mit einem Lenin-Anstecker, trugen eine Woche später Dutzende Jugendliche freiwillig die bislang völlig verschmähten Symbole.

Das Wichtigste an Depeche Mode war natürlich auch für Fans im Osten die Musik. Aus Mangel an Möglichkeiten, westliche Tonträger legal und erschwinglich zu erwerben, blieb lange Zeit das Radio die einzige Quelle. Dort konnte man die Songs auf Kassette mitschneiden. Im Radio wurden in der zweiten Hälfte der achtziger Jahre zumeist nur die aktuellen Singles gespielt. Man musste sich also durchfragen, welcher Kumpel und welcher Kumpel des Kumpels welche LP von Depeche Mode auf Kassette hatte und auch noch bereit wäre, diese zu überspielen. Dabei bestand eine zusätzliche Herausforderung im Kampf mit den Schwächen der analogen Technik. Schon die dritte Überspielung von Tape zu Tape war mit einem großen Qualitätsverlust und starkem Rauschen verbunden. Das Ziel vieler Fans war deshalb, möglichst an die Originalschallplatten heranzukommen. Wer das Glück hatte, eine Oma im Westen zu haben, wünschte sich nun zu Weihnachten Vinyl. Manchmal gab es Westplatten auch auf dem Schwarzmarkt, wo sie mehrere Hundert Ostmark kosteten und einige Lehrlingsgehälter auffraßen.

Ende der Achtziger war auch zu den DDR-Oberen durchgedrungen, was für eine große Fangemeinde Depeche Mode unter den Jugendlichen hatte, und man entschied sich in Kooperation mit der westdeutschen Plattenfirma Intercord, im Herbst 1986 auf dem staatlichen Amiga-Label eine Depeche-Mode-Platte herauszubringen. Die Auflage betrug aufgrund begrenzter Materialzuteilung in der Planwirtschaft nur 15.000 offizielle Exemplare.

Konnten sich die Ostfans mit Outfit, Musik und Postern irgendwie behelfen, so fehlte doch allen der wichtigste Baustein im Dasein eines Fans: ein Livekonzert. Depeche-Mode-Tourmanager JD Fanger hatte im Frühling 1987 einen neuen Anlauf gestartet, ob die Band in der DDR spielen könnte, nachdem es 1985 noch nicht geklappt hatte. Die Reaktionen aus Ostberlin waren zunächst verhalten, und viele Telexe (eine Art Fax) gingen hin und her. Gleichzeitig konnte er Konzerte in Prag und Warschau festmachen. Depeche Mode wussten durch Briefe, dass es jenseits des Eisernen Vorhangs zahlreiche Fans gab, wenn dies auch nicht anhand von Plattenverkaufszahlen nachweisbar war. Schließlich setzte sich auch der Kultursekretär der Ostberliner FDJ-Bezirksleitung Rainer Börner dafür ein, Depeche Mode einzuladen. Da die Funktionäre der mittleren Leitungsebene – im Gegensatz zur DDR-Regierung – keine Rentner waren, wussten sie von der Popularität der Band in der DDR und welchen Imagegewinn man dadurch erzielen könnte.

Für Konzerte in dieser Größenordnung stand in Ostberlin nur die Werner-Seelenbinder-Halle zur Verfügung mit Platz für insgesamt 6.481 Zuschauer. Kaum vorstellbar, was passieren könnte, wenn Zehntausende Fans ohne Karten nach Ostberlin fahren würden, um zu versuchen, doch noch ein Ticket zu bekommen. Daher überging die FDJ den Wunsch des Bandmanagements nach einem freien Kartenvorverkauf und hielt das Konzert zunächst geheim. Um aus der Veranstaltung trotzdem einen möglichst hohen ideologischen Nutzen gegenüber der Ostberliner Jugend zu erzielen, deklarierte die FDJ den Gig als "Geburtstagskonzert" anlässlich des 42. Jahrestages ihrer Gründung. Hierzu wurden alle Eintrittkarten kurz vor dem 7. März in den Ostberliner Schulen verteilt, pro Klasse zwei Karten. Der Platz vor der Werner-Seelenbinder-Halle war für das Konzert am Montag, dem 7. März 1988, weiträumig mit 500 FDJ-Ordnern, Polizisten in Uniform und in Zivil sowie massiven Zäunen abgesperrt. Selbst Armeekräfte in den berühmten hässlich-braunen Trainingsanzügen standen im Hintergrund bereit, sollten die Tausende ticketloser Fans aufmucken, die seit dem Nachmittag vor der Halle warteten. Insgesamt musste man fünf Ordnerketten passieren und jedes Mal sein Ticket vorzeigen, bis man schließlich in der Halle stand.

Die Schwarzmarktpreise für Eintrittskarten lagen je nach Geschäftstüchtigkeit des Verkäufers in den Seitenstraßen zwischen 150 und 800 Ostmark. Manche zahlten noch mehr oder tauschten gleich ihr Moped und sogar einen Trabant gegen eine Karte. Zum Vergleich: Ein älterer Schüler bekam damals von seinen Eltern etwa 10, maximal 20 Mark Taschengeld im Monat, Lehrlinge verdienten 120 Mark rutto im Monat. Der auf dem Ticket aufgedruckte Preis betrug 15 Mark. Auf einen Pkw wartete man etwa 15 Jahre. Aber Geld und materielle Dinge spielten wirklich keine Rolle, wenn es darum ging, seine Lieblingsband wenigstens einmal im Leben live zu erleben. Denn niemand glaubte damals, eine zweite Gelegenheit zu bekommen.

Montag, 7. März 1988, kurz nach 20 Uhr: Nicht wenige hatten Tränen in den Augen, als Dave Gahan "Good evening, East Börlin!" ins Mikro rief.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #17 on: 09 May 2013 - 04:48:14 »
2013-05-08 - manschoolshow (US) - Daniel "BRAT" Barassi interview

http://manschoolshow.com/blog/2013/5/8/class-15-i-work-for-my-favorite-band

Daniel Barassi has worked for his favorite band (and my own) -- Depeche Mode -- since 1998.  He's the web guy who handles all of their digital media.  Daniel also produces music under the monicker The Brat and does some work for the band The Bird and The Bee.

In this episode we talk about:

    The fan site he ran before he was hired.
    How he faxed a nasty letter that lead to him getting the job.
    Growing closer to band members Dave Gahan, Martin L. Gore, and Andy "Fletch" Fletcher.
    Joking around with frontman Dave Gahan.
    Visiting Martin Gore's house in Santa Barbara and seeing the keyboard room.
    Building DepecheMode.com from nothing to one of the best band sites out there.
    Going on tour with the band and filming shows and shooting photographs.
    Dealing with nerves around the band.
    Proving to the band he was a great employee and good guy -- and not just some fanboy.
    Advice for being around people you admire.
    Going record shopping with Martin at Amoeba in Hollywood.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #18 on: 10 May 2013 - 03:34:46 »
2013-05-09 - T Portal (Croatia) - Otvorena izložba 'Depeche Mode Fan Exhibition'

http://www.tportal.hr/showtime/glazba/260707/Otvorena-izlozba-Depeche-Mode-Fan-Exhibition.html

ZBIRKA BURMEISTER
Otvorena izložba 'Depeche Mode Fan Exhibition'

Najveću privatnu zbirku Depeche Modea možete u organizaciji Hrvatskog Telekoma pogledati na izložbi 'Depeche Mode Fan Exhibition' u Galeriji Klovićevi dvori

U sklopu ljetne turneje Depeche Modea, DT predstavlja jedinstvenu izložbu na kojoj je izloženo više od 100 rariteta i memorabilija iz najveće privatne zbirke Depeche Modea u svijetu - zbirke Burmeister. Izložba će se održati u samo tri odabrana grada - Berlinu, Budimpešti i Zagrebu.

Najbolji kolekcionarski primjerci uključuju jedinstvene artefakte iz zbirke Burmeister kao što je prva demo snimka benda, master ploče benda koje je izdala legendarna istočnonjemačka diskografska kuća Amiga, jedinstveni EMU-2 sampler koji je bend koristio, kao i službene dokumente policijske obavještajne službe o nadzoru nad klubovima fanova grupe Depeche Mode u nekadašnjem DDR-u.

Također, izlošci uključuju rane demo snimke, plakate za koncerte i fotografije, autograme, osobne predmete članova benda, rijetke ploče, nagrade, CD nosače zvuka i drugo.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #19 on: 10 May 2013 - 23:18:33 »
2013-05-10 - 24 sata (Croatia) - Otvorena izložba Depeche Mode Fan Exhibition

http://www.24sata.tv/tag/depeche-mode-26975

Otvorena izložba Depeche Mode Fan Exhibition

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #20 on: 20 May 2013 - 01:01:36 »
2013-05-14 - TV2 (Hungary) - Aktiv

http://tv2.hu/musoraink/aktiv/127511_azurak_csaba_kedvenceiben_gyonyorkodott.html

Azurák Csaba kedvenceiben gyönyörködött

A riport vágatlan verzióját – számos más exkluzív felvétel mellett – megtalálod az Aktív Extra vágatlan csatornánkban.

Hamarosan koncertezik nálunk a Depeche Mode! Addig is, míg a fiúk megérkeznek, egy német férfi tízezer darabos gyűjteményében gyönyörködhetnek a rajongók. A különleges relikviákra sok sztár is kíváncsi volt, a kiállítás megnyitóján ott volt a Tények nagy Depeche Mode-rajongó műsorvezetője, Azurák Csaba is, de Kovács Ákos és Hujber Feri is felbukkant…

Nézd meg az Aktív videóját!

A TV2 szórakoztató bulvármagazinjában a sztárhírek, a bulvárszenzációk, az erotika és különleges emberi történetek mellett aktualitások, valamint a mindennapok bosszantó, megoldásra váró ügyei is terítékre kerülnek. Az Aktív olyan sztorikat mutat be, melyek beszédtémát adnak az embereknek.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #21 on: 20 May 2013 - 01:11:46 »
2013-05-15 - Depechemode.de (Germany) - Neues Buch über Depeche Mode wiegt 2,5 Kilogramm

http://www.depechemode.de/neues-buch-ueber-depeche-mode-wiegt-25-kilogramm-25841

Monument
Neues Buch über Depeche Mode wiegt 2,5 Kilogramm
15. Mai 2013 von Sven Plaggemeier

Ein neues Buch über Depeche Mode findet bereits vor Verkaufsstart nicht nur in Fankreisen große Aufmerksamkeit: “Depeche Mode – Monument” (jetzt bei Amazon vorbestellen) erzählt die Bandgeschichte erstmalig auf 425 großformatigen Seiten und anhand von 2.500 Abbildungen. Vom ersten Demotape der Band aus dem Jahr 1980 bis zum aktuellen Album “Delta Machine” arbeiteten sich die Autoren Dennis Burmeister und Sascha Lange durch den kreativen Output von Depeche Mode und etlicher Soloprojekte und fassen damit die komplette Bandhistorie in einem 2,5 Kilogramm schwerem Wälzer zusammen.

So finden sich im Buch u.a. eine ausführliche Diskografie, seltene und bislang unveröffentlichte Fotos, Presse-Erklärungen, Tourdaten, Tour-Poster, Tickets, alte Autogrammkarten und ausgefallenes Promo-Material aus 30 Jahren Bandgeschichte wieder. Auch wird zum erstmals die Geschichte der Fan-Szene vorgestellt, die Depeche Mode seit ihren Anfangstagen begleitet und die zu einer der treuesten Gemeinschaften einer Band überhaupt zählt. Die Autoren gehen im Buch detailliert auf den Depeche-Mode-Informationservice ein, erzählen die Geschichte der Black-Monument-Asocciation (BMA), über die Fankultur in der DDR sowie heutige Fan-Events und Internetcommunitys.

Begleitend dazu gibt es exklusive Interviews u.a. mit Anne Haffmans (Mute Records), Götz Alsmann, Harald Bullerjahn (Tourmanager bis 1990), der Radio-Legende Olaf Zimmermann (dt64, radioEINS), früheren Intercord-Mitarbeitern wie Hans Derer und Erik Van Kassen sowie mit vielen Fans. Für Monument konnte man außerdem auf exklusives Material von Alan Wilder, Daryl Bamonte, Herbert R. Kollisch (früherer Geschäftsführer der Intercord), Jo Gahan, Deb Danahay, Tim Williams sowie zahlreicher Fans zurückgreifen.

Die Autoren des Buches sind in Fankreisen keine Unbekannten: Dennis Burmeister hat für Depeche Mode Monument seine Archive geöffnet, die zu einer der weltweit größten Sammlungen zählt. Die Texte kommen von Buchautor Sascha Lange.

Die Buchpremiere findet am 30. Mai im Kino Babylon in Berlin-Mitte statt. Harfenist Michael Matejcik, der bereits in Wien im Vorprogramm von Depeche Mode spielte, wird an diesem live zu Gast sein und im Anschluss gibt es dann den Videomitschnitt des Depeche-Mode-Gigs vom März 2013 in Wien letztmalig öffentlich zu sehen.

Mehr Infos zum Buch und Lesungen: www.facebook.com/DepecheModeMonument

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #22 on: 24 May 2013 - 02:21:44 »
2013-05-19 - glassrbije (Serbia) - Fan exhibition (video footage)

http://glassrbije.org/kultura/%C4%8Dlanak/izlo%C5%BEba-posve%C4%87ena-grupi-depeche-mode

Izložba posvećena grupi Depeche Mode
Ned, 19/05/2013 - 14:05 -- MRS

BEOGRAD - Izložba "World in My Eyes", posvećena bendu "Depeche Mode", predstavljena je u Ustanovi kulture "Parobrod" u okviru 10. "Noći muzeja", dan uoči nastupa čuvene grupe na beogradskom Ušću.

Izložba je zamišljena kao zajednički poduhvat organizatora "Noći muzeja" i obožavalaca benda "Depeche Mode".

Specijalni gost izložbe bio je jedan od najpoznatijih svetskih muzičkih fotografa Branislav Brajan Rašić.

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #23 on: 24 May 2013 - 04:16:56 »
2013-05-23 - The Poster Came From The Walls - Full version

https://vimeo.com/66832588


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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #24 on: 27 May 2013 - 03:34:03 »
2013-05-27 - Electronic Beats (Germany) - Tim Simenon shares his Depeche Moment

http://www.electronicbeats.net/2013/05/27/tim-simenon-shares-his-depeche-moment/

Tim Simenon shares his Depeche Moment
Monday, May 27, 2013 in Recommendations by Tim Simenon about Depeche Mode

In the next part of our series assessing the impact of Depeche Mode through personal narratives, British electronic music producer Tim Simenon, best known for his work as Bomb the Bas, remembers working with the band during their most tumultuous period. Photo by Luci Lux.

I grew up pretty quickly as a kid because, from a very young age, I didn’t live with my family. Growing up in London, I started buying music around the age of ten. I was just fascinated with sound. Eventually I started knocking about with people who really got me into music, to the point where I was DJing by the time I was 14 or 15; I was “the kid with the records”. By the time I’d finished my A-levels, I knew that music was something I would be heavily involved in during my life. That evolved three years into college courses at SAE in North London. One day I met up with James Horrocks, who was running a label called Rhythm King. He knew I was DJing, and also that at the time my technology skills were limited—I had two bags of records and an idea, basically. So he gave me two days in a studio with the producer Pascal Gabriel, and he helped me realize my idea. The success was an amazing surprise. I was a waiter at a restaurant when that first Bomb The Bass record went in the charts at number five, and I remember telling the owner the next day that I thought I had a new job.

From 1988-onwards, it felt like everything I was doing was leading up to working with Depeche Mode. I’d been a massive fan ever since picking up a copy of Some Bizzare with their photograph, and with Rhythm King being part of Mute and in the same offices at the time, it all just fell in to place. I knew Daniel Miller, and I’d always see Dave and Martin knocking about. One day in ’88, Miller asked me if I wanted to do a remix of “Strangelove”; my first-ever remix, actually. When Alan Wilder left and they were looking for a new producer, my name was already in the mix. I think Martin and Dave had enjoyed the Gavin Friday album I’d finished a year ago. So, I get another call from Miller telling me that the band wanted to meet with me and play me some demos they’d just written. I went to their offices and had a listen, and even though the structure was bare bones—guitar, voice, a simple beat—the melodies were all there as well, and I was blown away.

I remember being nervous as well; Dave’s health was fragile at the time, and there wasn’t any certainty that the band would carry on. Daniel said to me, “Oh, let’s just give it a go, maybe work on three of the tracks,” and there was always that kind of feeling; it wasn’t like we felt we were making an album. It wasn’t necessarily where the band was at either; Martin had only written the three songs, so there wasn’t an album’s worth of material anyway. The studio we were working was very comfortable but not flashy or anything; you could just walk in there and lounge, and the band liked that. As time went on, Martin grew more convinced that our chemistry together worked. We had a break over Christmas period while he wrote three more songs, and we just continued in this fashion. Eventually we ended up in LA, where Dave was based at the time, to record vocals. I was staying at a hotel, and I remember going out for a walk and coming back, and the hotel manager telling me, “Your mate Dave has just been taken to the hospital.”

Amazingly, he bounced right back and we were in the studio two weeks later. He was there with a sponsor and we were just recording vocals like nothing happened! He was actually clinically dead at one point, and suddenly he’s singing “Barrel of a Gun” like nothing happened! We were able to finish the rest of the album with a minimum amount of fuss, really. It was bonkers, but it was an amazing time as well. It was really one of the best years of my life, really. The album was made feeling like it would never be made, so to look back on what we did is just phenomenal.

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #25 on: 31 May 2013 - 03:55:35 »
2013-05-27 - Monument - First chapter online

http://issuu.com/marcusthie/docs/9783351050030

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #26 on: 08 June 2013 - 02:57:20 »
2013-05-30 - stuttgarter zeitung (Germany) - Wir waren die Krachverstärker

http://www.stuttgarter-zeitung.de/inhalt.der-depeche-mode-promoter-wir-waren-die-krachverstaerker.f1611729-ce1d-487d-a076-91ed086ddf16.html

 Der Depeche-Mode-Promoter „Wir waren die Krachverstärker“
Thomas Schwarz, 30.05.2013 16:36 Uhr

Winnenden - Mensch, das ist wie eine Zeitreise.“ Vor Hans Derer in seinem Büro in Winnenden liegt ein großformatiger Bildband, mehr als 400 Seiten stark. „Depeche Mode – Monument“ heißt das Buch, geschrieben von zwei langjährigen Fans der britischen Band, die darin nicht nur deren Geschichte wiedergeben, sondern eine unglaubliche Sammlung an Fotos, Fanartikeln, Schallplatten, Konzertplakaten und Sammlerstücken zeigen. Darunter das erste Demotape der Musiker oder handgeschriebene Konzertplakate aus den Gründerzeiten von Depeche Mode. Dennis Burmeister, der das Buch zusammen mit Sascha Lange geschrieben hat, sammelt seit 25 Jahren alles, was mit der Band zu tun hat. Darunter sind auch Pressemitteilungen der legendären Stuttgarter Plattenfirma Intercord. Geschrieben hat diese Hans Derer, der von 1981 bis 1989 Chef der Presseabteilung des kleinen, aber feinen Musikverlags in Sillenbuch war und Depeche Mode in Deutschland betreute.

Vier schüchterne Jungs in der Hamburger Markthalle

„Ich kann mich noch daran erinnern, wie vier schüchterne junge Musiker in der Hamburger Markthalle aufgetreten sind“, sagt Derer, der selbst als Schlagzeuger mit seinen Bands Anyone’s Daughter und Pancake spielte. „Als Musiker, Kaufmann und Journalist gab es für mich eigentlich nichts Besseres, als bei Intercord die Pressearbeit zu machen“, erinnert er sich. 1981 heuerte er dort an, in dem Jahr, als Martin Gore, Andrew Fletcher und Vince Clarke aus dem tristen Städtchen Basildon bei London ihre Band namens Composition of Sound gründeten. Dave Gahan stieß als Sänger dazu, fand den Namen zu sperrig und schlug stattdessen Depeche Mode vor, inspiriert von einer französischen Modezeitschrift. Mit Daniel Miller fanden sie kurz darauf einen Produzenten, dem es nicht in erster Linie um den Kommerz, sondern vor allem um gute Musik ging.

Millers Independent-Verlag Mute Records wurde zu Depeche Modes Label, dem sie auch treu blieben, als ihre ersten Titel in die britischen Charts kamen. „Das war mit ein Grund für ihren Erfolg. Bei Mute Records konnten sie ihre Musik so machen, wie sie wollten. Und wir haben sie auch immer machen lassen und nicht dazwischen geredet“, sagt Hans Derer.

Ein denkwürdiges Konzert im Oz

Über den Produzenten Rod Buckle, der die Platten seines Sonet-Labels bereits über Intercord in Deutschland vertrieb, kam nun auch Mute Records mit Depeche Mode nach Sillenbuch. „Intercord war eigentlich die Plattenfirma für Liedermacher“, erinnert sich Derer. Reinhard Mey veröffentlichte bei Intercord, Stephan Sulke, André Heller oder Herbert Grönemeyer. Der Intercord-Manager Jürgen Kramar verstand sich sofort sehr gut mit den „ Jungs“ von Depeche Mode und setzte Hans Derer mit ins Boot. „Ich brachte zwei wichtige Dinge mit: Mein Englisch war nicht schlecht, und ich war Musiker“, erinnert er sich. „Depeche Mode war ein ganz großes Ding. Damals ging es Intercord nicht sehr gut. Wir hatten gerade Mal einen Marktanteil von 0,5 Prozent.“

Das änderte sich mit der britischen Band, wenn auch nicht sofort. 600 Zuhörer kamen zu jenem Konzert in Hamburg. „Heute füllen sie Stadien.“ Trotz des Erfolgs in England wollten deutsche Medien nicht mitziehen. „Die Arroganz in dem Geschäft war ziemlich frustrierend“, sagt Hans Derer. „Im Musikexpress hieß es ,Kraftwerk meets Bay City Rollers’, was die Jungs auf die Palme gebracht hat. Wir sind doch keine Teenie-Band, haben die gesagt.“

„Kraftwerk meets Bay City Rollers“

Über Stadtmagazine, die Anfang der 80er-Jahre entstanden, ging jedoch mehr, die Zahl der deutschen Fans stieg. „Wir waren die Krachverstärker. Die USA, Japan, Westdeutschland waren die wichtigsten Märkte für Pop- und Rockmusik.“ Der Nimbus der Teenie-Band hing weiterhin über Depeche Mode. „Die haben mich ständig bekniet, nicht zu viel mit Bravo, Popcorn oder Pop-Rocky zu machen, weil sie befürchteten, dass sie dann nicht von den Musikzeitschriften ernst genommen werden.“

Mit „I just can’t get enough“ kam 1982 schließlich der erste Fernseh-Auftritt in Deutschland und der erste Schritt zum Erfolg. Im Dezember jenes Jahres trat Depeche Mode im Stuttgarter Club Oz auf, ein Eindruck, der Derer bis heute verfolgt. „Das Publikum hat erst am Ende geklatscht und Zugabe geschrien. Ich musste den Jungs erklären, dass das normal für Stuttgart ist. Die waren ziemlich frustriert“, sagt er lachend. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war Vince Clarke bereits nicht mehr bei Depeche Mode. Zusammen mit Alison Moyet, die ebenfalls aus Basildon stammt, gründete er Yazoo, später Erasure, die wie Moby, The KLF, Right said Fred oder Nick Cave bei Intercord von Derer betreut wurden.

Vor jeder Tournee ein Fußballmatch

Neben der Musik teilen sich Derer und Depeche Mode die Leidenschaft für Fußball. „Vor jeder Tournee gab es ein Match zwischen uns und der Band.“ Verstärkung bekam Intercord durch Presse- und Rundfunkleute. „Wolfgang Heim stand bei uns im Tor, Stefan Siller war Rechtsaußen“, erinnert sich Derer. Beim Match 1987 wurde er von zwei Depeche-Mode-Spielern so in die Zange genommen, dass er einen Kreuzbandriss davon trug. „Als ich am nächsten Tag aus der Narkose erwachte, stand ein Bäumchen neben meinem Bett mit einem Zettel dran: 1945, 1966, 1987 – poor old Germany, stand darauf. Das ist halt der berühmte britische Humor.“

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #27 on: 18 June 2013 - 21:02:54 »
2013-06-08 - Süddeutsche Zeitung (Germany) - Fan-Ausstellung in Berlin Depeche Mode im Museum

http://www.sueddeutsche.de/kultur/depeche-mode-im-museum-1.1690786

Fan-Ausstellung in Berlin Depeche Mode im Museum

Direkt aus dem dpa-Videokanal

Depeche Mode und ihre Fans - zwischen ihnen gibt es seit über drei Jahrzehnten eine ganz besonders enge Beziehung. In der "Depeche Mode Fan Exhibition" wird diese vom 7. bis 20. Juni in Berlin gezeigt.

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #28 on: 01 July 2013 - 05:30:13 »
2013-06-18 - KROQ (US) - Depeche Mode’s ‘Concert For The Masses’ Rose Bowl Show, 25 Years Later

http://kroq.cbslocal.com/2013/06/18/depeche-modes-concert-for-the-masses-rose-bowl-show-25-years-later/

Depeche Mode’s ‘Concert For The Masses’ Rose Bowl Show, 25 Years Later
June 18, 2013 10:45 AM

Today marks a historic day in Depeche Mode’s career. Twenty five years ago, on June 18, 1988, the British synth-pop band played the 101st show of their Music For The Masses Tour to more than 65,000 fans at the famed Rose Bowl in Pasadena, Calif. But this show proved to be more special than any of the 100 before it. This show would be dubbed the “Concert for the Masses,” and go down as the band’s most indelible performance.

Thanks to Depeche Mode fan site DM TV Archives, an 18-minute short film was assembled from television news and personal footage boasting several never-before-seen and behind-the-scenes clips from the day of the Rose Bowl concert, which you can watch here.

“This will be a very big occasion for us,” said former member Alan Wilder in a pre-concert press conference (shown in the video). “Not only being the largest but also the most prestigious concert we’ve ever played as a headline act.”

Interviewed just prior to taking the stage, Martin Gore, the band’s chief songwriter admitted, “We’re quite nervous. It’s the biggest event… Biggest crowd we’ve ever played to.” But it is the 101st show [on the tour]. We’re quite rehearsed. We’re quite ready for it.”

According to keyboardist Andrew Fletcher, the band’s biggest audience to date had been 40,000. The Rose Bowl audience would dwarf that number by at least 25,000. The show coincided with the 10th anniversary of KROQ, which had been a longtime Depeche Mode supporter.

“Every other radio station in SoCal mocked us on the air saying, ‘Depeche Mode should be at the Palladium not at a stadium’ and in truth behind the scenes we were all nervous,” Richard Blade, a KROQ DJ at the time of the show, recounted to Radio.com. “I drove into the vast empty arena with Depeche Mode on an overcast February morning to announce the concert and the tickets on sale, and after the live broadcast had concluded I had breakfast with the band and Martin Gore confided in me that he was nervous and hoped they could at least sell out the floor seats – just 10,000 tickets.”

The concert went on sale as planned and was widely considered a sellout.

The concert also featured ’80s alt icons O.M.D., Wire and Thomas Dolby. Interviewed just minutes before they were set to go on stage, Andy McCluskey and Paul Humphreys of O.M.D. admitted that they were rather nervous. “This is the largest gig we’ve done in America,” Humphreys added.

At the close of the show, the enthusiastic crowd sung the chorus to “Everything Counts” for nearly ten minutes after the band said their goodbyes.

“I sang ‘Everything Counts’ with 65,000 other people as the concert ended, and I felt like I was part of something unique and special, something that would never happen again,” recalled actor Wil Wheaton (best known for his role on Star Trek: The Next Generation) on his blog. “Over the years, I’ve run into other people who were at the same show, and even the ones who weren’t fifteen and given to over-romanticizing things tell me that they felt the same thing.”

“They knew this was a milestone for them and for KROQ, and for two hours they pulled out all the stops and left everything on the stage,” Blade explained. “Backstage, after their amazing performance, I chatted with [singer] Dave Gahan as he cried from pure happiness. He told me that the tears were because he didn’t know if the group could ever pull off anything this great again and for him it was the most emotional concert of his career.”

Blade met up with Gahan a year later in Florida and reminisced about the show. “Dave said, ‘It wasn’t just an important show for D’Mode it was an important show for new music in America.’”

A live album of Depeche Mode’s historic Rose Bowl performance, titled 101, was released in 1989 and available on iTunes. The performance was made into a concert film, also titled 101, which is now a bit hard to find but available here (or in full on YouTube, surprisingly).

Depeche Mode is currently touring the world in support of their 13th album, Delta Machine. The band is scheduled to play 20 U.S. dates beginning with in Detroit’s DTE Energy Theatre on August 13.

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Re: 2013: Other News
« Reply #29 on: 06 July 2013 - 01:01:23 »
2013-06-xx - Depechemodebiographie.de (Germany) - Interview with Steve Lyon

http://www.depechemodebiographie.de/einterviewslyon.php

Interview with Steve Lyon

In June 2013 I had the opportunity to chat with Steve Lyon.
He started his career as engineer and producer in the late 1980's under Rolling Stones/ The Who producer Glyn Johns. He got involved with Depeche Mode as an engineer at Violator, worked on Death's Door and Songs of Faith and Devotion (SOFAD) and was co-producer of SOFAD Live and Devotional (DVD). He was also involved when Alan co-produced Nitzer Ebb's album Ebbhead in 1991 and at the Recoil-records Bloodline (1992) and Unsound Methods (1997).
Later Steve Lyon worked as producer for bands like e.g. Ampliflier, The Cure, Reamonn, Reinvented, Paradise Lost or Neo. He was involved in productions of e.g. Dave Stewart, Suzanne Vega and Paul McCartney.
Since 2007 he is producing and managing the band Suzerain.

Note: The following interview parts don't follow a strict question-answer-construct but were taken from a larger context. The questions referred to special context of the biography. You should read the referring chapter to see the context.

Depechemodebiographie.de: I'm mainly interested in the team work. The band members said they had a very organised team work. Martin wrote the songs and then left it to Alan to work out the music and the sounds, and he himself sometimes told what he liked or didn't like. It is said that Fletch was at the organising front and that he was some kind of spokesman for Martin. But no one ever said something about the role Dave had in this team.

Steve Lyon: "I came in to the production of Violator when there was one song finished and the rest of the songs were kind of half way through but had no vocals. I didn't see Dave really much involved in the creation of the sounds or the directions of the songs. He would come in and sing and did a fantastic job but wasn't really involved in the creativity of the material. I think he was very positive on his part and very supportive in what we were doing. I think the team work really worked. There weren't many conflicts. Because they had developed a style and a sound and they knew it had functioned previously on different albums like Black Celebration and Music for the Masses. They had proven that the team worked and there weren't any reasons to change it. In other scenarios I worked in this wasn't the case. Other bands operate very differently and that's why Depeche functioned so very well in the studio. There were never any doors closed. It was quite the opposite. The more you could bring in ... you know, I could turn to Alan and Flood saying 'What about this? What about this sound?' ... the more excited the whole crew became."

"Sometimes Martin would come in saying, 'I don't like this' and 'I don't really like that', and then we would work on things to get a different version but he would trust a lot in the three of us, Alan, Flood and myself. And Fletch as well, y'know. Fletch would come in, say his thing but leave it to us because he knew something good would come out."

Depechemodebiographie.de: Alan once spoke about the two different sides in the band - the conservative and the adventurous sides. I think he meant Martin and Fletch to be the conservative side and Dave and himself to be the adventurous side. And when it became difficult during the recordings of SOFAD it came to my mind if Dave's role might have been more important than anyone would have expected. That he was important for the team spirit and bringing in some balance into the group itself, y'know.

Steve Lyon: "Well, a band is a balance. And when the balance becomes difficult ... unfortunately the band fell apart ... but, yeah, Dave and Alan were the more adventurous in the material. I can remember sitting in Spain and chatting with Dave about the Red Hot Chili Peppers in which Alan also was very much into, the stuff coming from Seattle, American rock bands, hearing Nirvana on MTV the first time, Perry Farrell's band Jane's Addiction. Their album came out when we were recording SOFAD. Dave was a big fan and I sat down and listened to together with Dave, and that was something Martin and Fletch never listened to. Flood also was influenced by many things. It was a pretty impressive team I have to say. My job was to make the sounds more adventurous and creating a platform for Alan and Flood to work on. I think it was a very creative time. Fletch can be a very negative person about what can happen next and I think he was worried a bit about the change from Violator to SOFAD, Alan, Flood and myself were not and nor was Dave. I think Martin was kind of middle ground ... but we all knew there's was something good in what we were doing. Later they were very much surprised by the success of SOFAD considering what had been spoken about during the making of the album. Like 'Is it too far away from Violator?' But if you ask any Depeche fan about his favourite albums he will probably say Violator and SOFAD. When I started working with them I was completely unaware of the back catalogue. I knew some old singles and old songs but I really didn't know them at all. And I remember we took a break at the recording in London and I got a delivery from Mute with the whole back catalogue of Depeche stuff and I sat down at the weekend and I was completely blown away. I was like, 'Wow, why I never knew this?' And I remember I was talking to Alan and Flood about it, and for them this was a good thing. On a creative side this is a good thing because you are not afraid to propose ideas or change sounds and do things. When you are aware of the band's history and their success you can get scared and on a creative side that can be bad. You can always get backwards. The step forward is the most difficult thing."

Depechemodebiographie.de: What I'm trying to do with this biography is to take out some of the myth about all the pain and suffering. Most biographies and articles are about the dark sides, drugs, drugs and drugs ...

Steve Lyon: "Well, certainly towards the end of the time I was working with them or during the time in Spain and then a little bit in Germany it was quite obvious that Dave was having a bad time. He had a lot of support from everyone, from the band, certainly from me, certainly from Flood, from Daniel Miller. Everyone could realise that he was having a difficult time. But it didn't really stop the creative work. When I look back at this time, Violator, Violation-Tour, pre-production of SOFAD ... I wouldn't say it was a dark, difficult period. Completely opposite, I had a great time. They are really nice guys, they are brilliant to hang out with. I can remember walking around the Reeperbahn in Germany, with the band and the whole crew, having a great time! We weren't worried about fans or anything, just having a good time. Going back to the hotel where we stayed there in Hamburg, sitting around the piano, playing, singing, fans coming in, watching ... it was a very happy, creative period. Unfortunately Dave had a difficult time but it hadn't an influence on what we were doing."

Depechemodebiographie.de: I think that there were really two different sides. When you read the statements of the band members carefully you see that they had their problems but also had fun. But ... I'm also trying to understand why their working relationships didn't work so well anymore. I think maybe Alan and Martin simply developed into different directions in their musical approach.

Steve Lyon: "Their musical tastes were quite different. And I think that this blend of what they were doing made it work to be honest. I remember being in the studio in Spain and I went to see Martin in his room and he was listening to soul music, gospel, Elvis, 80's electronic music, he had a very wide taste. And the same was with Alan. When you listen to Recoil stuff ... the track we did with Moby, [Curse], when you listen to Moby's solo records they are almost identical to what he did with Alan. I don't think they had really a different musical approach. It wasn't too much of a problem."
(See in context -> 1992) "I don't know really why Alan decided to leave the band. I knew before it became a common knowledge. I don't know if he told anyone else but I knew that he was going to leave. I really think it's really unfortunate because the working relationships and the success that they had were good. When we were working together it was incredible. It's a real shame that he left. Sometimes things have to break and then go together again. So let's wait and see. They had been together in the band for a long time. And he took a very, very lead role in the band and it's a shame that they are not working together again."

Depechemodebiographie.de: You also worked together with Alan on Nitzer Ebb's album Ebbhead. He was the producer, wasn't he?

Steve Lyon: "He was the co-producer together with Flood. Then Flood left because he went on working with U2 and then I finished it with Alan."

Depechemodebiographie.de: Was the way of working with Alan on other projects different in comparison with working on Depeche Mode-projects?

Steve Lyon: "Not really. It was a very similar method actually. There were a couple of songs that were born at this time, at Nitzer Ebb, he had a very strong opinion about but it was not his band. He took a step back. He wouldn't necessary do this with Depeche. But it was quite similar to work with Depeche. Over the course of time Alan certainly had developed some kind of style like everyone does."

Depechemodebiographie.de: I'm a huge fan of Paradise Lost's album Host, their so-called Depeche Mode-album. I never saw it that way although many people say it sounds like Depeche. I always saw it as a try to record Goth Metal with strings and synthesizers. But then I noticed recently for the first time that you produced it. Did you take over some of Alan's style to your own work?

Steve Lyon: "Oh very much. The thing with Paradise Lost is ... That wasn't the first time they asked me. They asked me about four or three times to work with them and I always said 'no'. Then I spoke to Greg and Nick from Paradise Lost and they said to me that they wanted to make a very different kind of album. And I said: 'Okay, and what kind of album do you want to make?' And they said: 'We don't want to make a heavy rock album, we want to make something completely different.' And I said: 'Okay, let's see how we get on. Let's get together.' And at this time ... I just finished working with The Cure I think, y'know, I finished Depeche, then working with The Cure and then with Paradise Lost. I heard people talking about this album but at the end of the day it's their record. This is what they wanted and this is what they got. It was a very different kind of record for them. It was quite successful. They were successful before this album and after it but it was a different success they had with this album. If you had listened to the demos to this album the final result wasn't so different. So, that's the album they wanted to make. A band always knows what they want. A producer is the person in the middle to bring in an external voice. I think it's quite a compliment. I heard people saying it a few times but it just shows you what they wanted. I think the Nitzer Ebb album is a bit like a Depeche Mode album as well but maybe this is why they wanted Alan and Flood to produce it."

Later, when I showed the interview to him to make sure that all quotations are correct and in the right context, and he was reading the part with Alan telling about preparing the backing tapes for Devotional when the system crashed, Steve Lyon says: "Alan and I had finished our time at Olympic [in London] but still had an enormous amount of work to do, Alan also wanted to play some live drums, so we went to his house. I remember on our last Olympic Studio evening we said, 'ok Pub!' But I said, 'Wait, I'm going to record from the Roland samplers onto 32 Mitsubishi as a back up.' So, I set it up, hit record and we went for a beer. Thankfully that saved us as the system crashed a week later and we would have lost everything, 2 months of work."

steve-lyon.com