Depeche Mode Television Archives Forum

Author Topic: 2015: Other News  (Read 3453 times)

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
2015: Other News
« on: 19 January 2015 - 08:26:31 »
This thread contains all news items about Depeche Mode which have been published in 2015 but are not regarding Delta Machine or its tour or any other specific DM/solo project.

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #1 on: 21 March 2015 - 23:57:20 »
2015-02-26 - Record Collector (UK) - Everything Counts

[Scanned by me.]







http://recordcollectormag.com/articles/everything-counts

From electro upstarts to rock legends, Depeche Mode’s journey has been long and at times tough. Collecting them is as demanding, with formats galore. But it’s also rewarding, as Evangelos Zaoutsos explains in this guide to their global rarities

EVERYTHING COUNTS
by Evangelos Zaoutsos

Arguably the best of the electro-pop outfits to emerge in the wake of the new wave, and certainly the only one of the 80s to translate their early success in the singles market to worldwide superstar band status, becoming heroes and touring icons on both sides of the Atlantic, Depeche Mode retain a huge allure for collectors. Built around a core of Dave Gahan (vocals), Martin Gore (keyboards, guitar) and Andy Fletcher (keyboards), they’ve released an impressive body of great music, with many of their records trailing a series of curios and rarities behind them.

Their international fame means that anyone who seeks to gather everything by the band is in it for the long haul, and rare gems have been uncovered as far and wide as the Philippines and Peru. Add the ephemera that collectors crave – press sheets, stickers and one-off sleeves, everything counts! – and you’ve got enough fascination in the band to keep you going for a lifetime. New material is being discovered on a regular basis – like so many bands who made it in the 80s, theirs was a career formed during the “Great Format Wars”, when records were pressed in different mixes, issued on various formats, and promo items sometimes offered variants that were not commercially available at all. This is both a collector’s paradise – and …

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #2 on: 22 March 2015 - 21:18:39 »
2015-03-20 - Anton Corbijn 1-2-3-4 - Dave Gahan and Martin Gore texts

[Anton Corbijn is having an exhibition in the Fotomuseum and the Gemeentemuseum, from March 21 till June 21. For this exhibition, a book is also being released. This book (and exhibition) contains never-before-seen photos, including six of DM, as well as texts by many artists, including Dave Gahan and Martin Gore. The text by Martin Gore can be found online and is transcribed by me:]

https://www.behance.net/gallery/24818731/Anton-Corbijn-1-2-3-4




As anyone viewing this exhibition will see, we have been working with Anton for many decades. Our first encounter was for a front cover shot for the NME in 1981, but maybe we should forget that. Anton hated our music at the time and it was just a brief encounter - a job.

In 1986 we asked him if he would be interested in working on a video for our single 'A Question Of Time.' He keenly agreed. We should have been suspicious! He later admitted that his enthusiasm had nothing to do with us our the song - he fancied shooting a video in America!

That video and the photographs that were taken around the same time were our first real work together. I think that Anton realised that we weren't so bad and we realised that our perception of him was completely misconceived! We spent most of the time laughing. How did this happen? Anton was supposed to be serious, black and white and grainy, and we were supposed to be be doomy and mysterious!

We have had a lot of fun together over the years and through that laughter Anton has managed to bring out the best in us, give us an identity. People talk about having their souls stolen by a photographer. I think that with every photograph Anton takes, a little piece of his soul is imparted into the image. There is an undeniable yet indefinable element to all of his work. An inherent seriousness behind the laughter. A spirituality lurking beneath the sensuality. Yet there is so much more. Something that is impossible to describe. This is the mark of great art. It touches us in ways that are subtle, almost imperceptible. It attacks us on a subconscious level.

That is enough of my bullshit! Now look at some of the ridiculous outfits Anton has persuaded us to wear over the years! Believe me, it took a lot of love and trust! He deserves it!

- Martin Gore (Depeche Mode)

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #3 on: 28 March 2015 - 18:56:31 »
2015-03-22 - Avrotros (Netherlands) - Kunstuur

[Anton Corbijn is having an exhibition in the Fotomuseum and the Gemeentemuseum, from March 21 till June 21. In this report, popjournalist Hester Carvalho explains Corbijn's influence on Depeche Mode.]

http://web.avrotros.nl/kunstuur/uitzendingen/nieuweaflevering.aspx



"Mag ik een foto van je maken?”. Fotograaf Anton Corbijn heeft veel beroemdheden vastgelegd en wat begon als het simpelweg fotograferen van muzikanten die hij interessant vond, breidde zich uit tot een professie. Al snel werd hij overal gevraagd om portretfoto’s te maken, waardoor hij exclusieve toegang kreeg tot de privélevens van bekendheden. Voor de muziekliefhebber een droom die uitkomt.

Hollands Deep
In deze uitzending van Kunstuur heeft presentator Lucas De Man een openhartig interview met Anton Corbijn. De internationaal beroemde fotograaf en filmmaker leidt De Man rond in het Haagse Fotomuseum en het Gemeentemuseum Den Haag en vertelt uitgebreid over zijn retrospectief Hollands Deep dat daar momenteel te zien is. Corbijns tentoonstelling bestaat uit twee delen: zijn grofkorrelige popfoto's uit de jaren 70 en 80 en zijn 'best of' waarin de kunstenaar nieuwe thema's kiest en experimenteert met techniek en materiaal.

Het kiezen van het juiste moment
Aanvankelijk wilde Corbijn muzikant worden. De wereld van de punk- en rockmuziek trok hem sterk en hoewel hij uiteindelijk geen muzikant is geworden, heeft hij wel degelijk optimaal van de muziekwereld kunnen genieten. Met de camera kon hij dichter bij zijn idolen komen. Corbijn begon zijn carrière als hoofdfotograaf van het Nederlandse muziektijdschrift OOR. Al snel kreeg hij internationale faam en reisde hij de wereld af om portretfoto’s van beroemdheden te maken. Zo heeft hij onder andere Bob Dylan, David Bowie en Clint Eastwood voor eeuwig vastgelegd. Tevens ontwierp hij platenhoezen, regisseerde hij videoclips en alsof dat nog niet genoeg was ging hij later zelfs nog films maken. “Het is ook niet zo moeilijk, fotografie”, zegt Corbijn. “Het is gewoon momenten kiezen”.

Rocklegendes voor de lens
In deze uitzending spreekt Lucas De Man ook met popjournalist Hester Carvalho over de rocklegendes die Anton Corbijn gedurende de jaren voor zijn lens heeft gehad.

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #4 on: 17 May 2015 - 04:00:41 »
2015-05-13 - Charitybuzz (US) - Signed Depeche Mode Guitar & Complete CD Collection



https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=999790523374187&id=112221498797765
https://www.charitybuzz.com/catalog_items/804523?fb_action_ids=10152724461746249

Ultimate Depeche Mode fan package incl. a signed guitar, complete DVD set, TShirts and more donated by ‪#‎martingore‬ was just added to our auction!

Signed Depeche Mode Guitar & Complete CD Collection
ESTIMATED VALUE $1,000

The ultimate Depeche Mode fan package!
This package includes:
    Depeche Mode Signed Guitar
    Complete CD collection
    T-shirts
Donated by: Martin Gore

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #5 on: 20 May 2015 - 22:05:52 »
2015-05-19 - DMTour.de (Germany) - Interview with Gareth Jones

http://www.dmtour.de/interview-gareth-jones.htm

Depeche Mode - Behind the Scenes

Interview Nr. 3
Mit Gareth Jones, Produzent der Berliner Depeche-Mode-Alben “Construktion Time Again”, "Some Great Reward“ und “Black Celebration”.
Christian Haase

DM-Tour:
Hallo Gareth, vielen Dank, dass Du Dir die Zeit für ein Interview genommen hast.

Gareth Jones:
Hi Christian!

DM-Tour:
Zwischen 1983 und 1986 hast Du Depeche Mode als Produzent in den Berliner Hansa-Studios begleitet. Wie lange hast Du selbst in Berlin gelebt?

Gareth Jones:
Ich habe etwa von 1983 bis 1992 in Berlin gelebt, unter anderem in der Nähe des Potsdamer Platzes.

DM-Tour:
Wie sieht es mit Deinen Deutschkenntnissen aus?

Gareth Jones (antwortet auf Deutsch):
„Für die Frage ich möchte sagen, mein Deutsch ist nicht so schlecht und ich spreche sehr gern Deutsch.“

DM-Tour:
Wann genau hast Du Depeche Mode zum ersten Mal getroffen?

Gareth Jones:
Zum ersten Mal traf ich die Band vor den Aufnahmen zum Album “Construction Time Again”. Das war im Büro von „Mute Records“, am Londoner Kensington Square, wo wir zu einem Vorstellungsgespräch verabredet waren.

DM-Tour:
Waren die Jungs, als sie 1983 nach Berlin kamen, fasziniert von der Atmosphäre in der geteilten Stadt?

Gareth Jones:
Wir alle fanden es inspirierend, in Berlin zu arbeiten und mochten die Atmosphäre – und die Menschen. Berlin ist eine wundervolle Stadt.

DM-Tour:
Welche Erinnerungen verbindest Du mit den Studioaufnahmen von 1984 bis 1986?

Gareth Jones:
Wenn ich an die Aufnahmen mit Depeche Mode zurückdenke, fallen mir in erster Linie die Begeisterung und Experimentierfreude ein. Wir haben im Studio stets versucht, Neues zu schaffen – experimentelle Popmusik eben.

DM-Tour:
Wer war, neben Daniel Miller, Dein Hauptansprechpartner bei Depeche Mode?

Gareth Jones:
Wir haben alle sehr eng zusammengearbeitet – und die Beziehungen untereinander waren gleichermaßen wichtig. Eigentlich haben wir während der meisten Zeit sehr gut miteinander harmoniert.

DM-Tour:
Hast Du die Band in ihrer Berliner Zeit eher als Freunde – oder als funktionierendes Team wahrgenommen?

Gareth Jones:
Im Großen und Ganzen hatten alle ein gut funktionierendes Arbeitsverhältnis. Hin und wieder gingen wir zwar gemeinsam ein Bier trinken oder etwas essen. Aber da wir fast jeden Tag im Studio waren, hieß es immer „arbeiten, arbeiten, arbeiten“ – „You’ve got to work hard“!

DM-Tour:
Zu welcher Uhrzeit haben die Arbeiten in den Hansa-Tonstudios regulär begonnen bzw. geendet?

Gareth Jones:
Die Studiosessions starteten in der Regel zwischen 11 und 12 Uhr. Manchmal war ich schon etwas früher da, um das Equipment zu checken und aufzubauen. Wir haben teilweise sehr lange gearbeitet, manchmal bis 1 Uhr, 2 Uhr oder sogar 3 Uhr morgens. Und wenn wir einen engen Zeitplan hatten, haben wir auch mal die ganze Nacht durchgearbeitet.

DM-Tour:
Gab es während der Aufnahmen in Berlin auch freie Tage? Und was hat die Band an solchen Tagen unternommen?

Gareth Jones:
Ich habe keine Ahnung, was die Band an freien Tagen gemacht hat – wahrscheinlich entspannen oder Schlaf nachholen. Als wir das Album „Black Celebration“ produziert haben, gab es vom Beginn der Aufnahmen bis zur Fertigstellung des Endmixes keinen einzigen freien Tag. Wir haben absolut jeden Tag im Studio verbracht.

DM-Tour:
Wann hast Du die von Martin Gore geschriebenen Demos in der Regel zum ersten Mal gehört?

Gareth Jones:
Normalerweise hat mir Daniel Miller die Demos, kurz bevor wir ins Studio gingen, zugeschickt. Da habe ich die Songs dann auch zum ersten Mal gehört.

DM-Tour:
Habt Ihr sämtliche Demos von Martin produziert? Oder hat sich die Band gelegentlich dafür entschieden, Songs „auszusortieren“?

Gareth Jones:
Martin schrieb keine “überschüssigen” Songs. Soweit ich weiß, landeten nahezu all seine Demos auf dem kommenden Album. Er gehört nicht zu der Sorte Songwriter, die 50 Stücke schreiben und daraus dann 10 fürs Album auswählen. Vielmehr hat er 12 Songs geschrieben, wovon 10 aufs Album und 2 auf die Single-B-Seiten kamen.

DM-Tour:
Was meinst Du – wie viele unveröffentlichte Depeche-Mode-Songs liegen irgendwo im Safe? Und wie lautet das Passwort?

Gareth Jones:
Ich glaube nicht, dass es unveröffentlichte Songs von Depeche Mode gibt.

DM-Tour:
Was hat Dave Gahan während der Instrumentalaufnahmen für gewöhnlich getan?

Gareth Jones:
Dave war, so wie alle anderen auch, extrem wichtig für die Atmosphäre bei der Entstehung einer Platte. Während wir in Berlin die Backing-Tracks produzierten, hat er uns oft ermutigt oder unsere Arbeit kritisch unter die Lupe genommen.

DM-Tour:
Wo hat der Sänger seine Gesangsparts eingeübt?

Gareth Jones:
In den Hansa-Tonstudios gab es jede Menge Platz – und somit auch viele Ecken, wo Dave sich zurückziehen und seine Stimme aufwärmen bzw. Gesangsparts einstudieren konnte.

DM-Tour:
Hast Du damals einen großen Unterschied zwischen Alan Wilder und den Jungs aus Basildon empfunden?

Gareth Jones:
Als ich anfing, mit Depeche Mode zu arbeiten, war Alan offensichtlich “der Neue”. Als wir dann Jahre später die „Black Celebration“ abgeschlossen haben, war er ein kompletter Teil des Teams.

DM-Tour:
Hattet Ihr ein gemeinsames Ritual, wenn die Arbeit an einer Single oder einem Album abgeschlossen war?

Gareth Jones:
Nach dem Fertigstellen eines Projekts gingen wir erst mal schlafen – denn wir waren wirklich sehr müde.

DM-Tour:
Das Video von “Everything Counts” wurde in West-Berlin aufgenommen. Hat die Band hierfür persönliche Ideen beigesteuert?

Gareth Jones:
Ich war nicht in die Arbeiten zum Video von „Everything Counts“ involviert, bin mir aber ziemlich sicher, dass die Band zusammen mit dem Regisseur geeignete Drehorte ausgewählt hat.

DM-Tour:
Als Pionier in Sachen digitales Equipment warst Du maßgeblich daran beteiligt, dass das Sampling Einzug in die Musik hielt. Haben Depeche Mode in Berlin viele Samples, z. B. auf der Straße oder in leerstehenden Fabrikhallen, aufgenommen?

Gareth Jones:
Wir haben häufig Samples aufgenommen, fast überall. Insbesondere kann ich mich noch an eine Session auf dem Dach der Hansa-Studios erinnern – genauer gesagt auf der Terrasse, außerhalb des Mixrooms.

DM-Tour:
Könntest Du mir die damalige Fan-Situation vor den Hansa-Tonstudios beschreiben?

Gareth Jones:
Nach dem Erfolg des Albums “Construction Time Again” hatten wir jede Menge Fans, die zum Studio gepilgert kamen und vor dem Gebäude oder auf den Treppen warteten. Es war eine tolle Atmosphäre.

DM-Tour:
Wo hat die Band während der Aufnahmen in den Hansa-Studios gegessen? Gab es einige spezielle Orte in der Nähe des Potsdamer Platzes? Oder habt Ihr Euch lieber Essen bestellt?

Gareth Jones:
Es gab ein italienisches Restaurant im Erdgeschoss der Hansa-Studios in der Köthener Straße. Dort haben wir oft gegessen. Oder wir sind in der Gegend herumgelaufen und haben uns ein Restaurant gesucht. Einen Lieferservice haben wir eher selten genutzt.

DM-Tour:
Wie sah Euer Nachtleben aus? Seid ihr oft ausgegangen?

Gareth Jones:
Besonders oft weggegangen sind wir nicht, weil wir immer sehr lange gearbeitet haben. Dafür hatten wir aber jede Menge Spaß im Studio. Und natürlich sind wir hin und wieder um die Ecke gegangen, ein Bier trinken. An viele Partys erinnere ich mich allerdings nicht.

DM-Tour:
Welche Location hast Du in Berlin gern besucht?

Gareth Jones:
Meine Lieblingsbar in Berlin war das „Dina“ (Anmerkung der Redaktion: Schreibweise des Namens kann variieren). Besonders mochte ich, dass dort keine Musik gespielt wurde.

DM-Tour:
Welche Rolle spielte für die Jungs von Depeche Mode zur damaligen Zeit Alkohol, sowohl im Studio als auch in der Freizeit?

Gareth Jones:
Während der Aufnahmen haben wir eigentlich überhaupt keinen Alkohol getrunken. Und, soweit ich mich erinnere, auch nicht besonders viel außerhalb des Studios.

DM-Tour:
Durch die Erfolge In den Achtzigerjahren wurden die Bandmitglieder bald zu Millionären. Hat sich das irgendwie bemerkbar gemacht?

Gareth Jones:
Ich habe mit der Band nie über Geld gesprochen. Wir sprachen über Musik.

DM-Tour:
Mal was ganz Alltägliches: Welche Verkehrsmittel haben Depeche Mode in Berlin vorzugsweise genutzt?

Gareth Jones:
Es kann durchaus sein, dass die Bandmitglieder des Öfteren die U-Bahn benutzt haben. Hauptsächlich erinnere ich mich aber daran, dass wir im Taxi unterwegs waren.

DM-Tour:
Martin lebte ja bekanntlich zeitweise bei seiner Berliner Freundin. Wo haben Dave, Andy und Alan während der Aufnahmen gewohnt?

Gareth Jones:
Während der Aufnahmen zu „Construction Time Again“ waren Depeche Mode im Hotel InterContinental untergebracht. Eventuell sind sie dort auch in den darauffolgenden Jahren wieder abgestiegen.

DM-Tour:
Hatte Daniel Miller während der Berlin-Periode eine eigene Wohnung bezogen?

Gareth Jones:
Nein, Daniel hatte keine Wohnung in Berlin.

DM-Tour:
Vielleicht noch eine Frage zum Abschluss: Bist Du traurig, dass die Zeit in Berlin vorüber ist?

Gareth Jones:
Ich bin nicht traurig. Das Leben geht weiter und ich besuche Berlin nach wie vor – ich liebe Berlin!

DM-Tour:
Das ist doch ein gutes Schlusswort – herzlichen Dank für das tolle Interview!

Gareth Jones:
Gern geschehen, viel Glück!

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #6 on: 28 July 2015 - 02:01:16 »
2015-07-09 - Sky Arts (UK) - Discovering Depeche Mode

http://www.sky.com/tv/show/discovering-depeche-mode

Discovering Depeche Mode
Enjoy The Silence

This fascinating look at the rise of English electronic band Depeche Mode follows David Gahan, Martin Gore and Andrew Fletcher from the band's formation in 1980 through to the creation of their hit  compositions which would influence much of the electronic music that followed.

Their early sound was defined by the synthesiser with hits such as Everything Counts 1983), People are People (1985) and Strangelove (1987).

However it was the release of singles Personal Jesus and Enjoy The Silence followed by the album Violator (1990) that propelled Depeche Mode to global superstardom. Three years later their status as one of the biggest groups in the world was sealed when the LP Songs of Faith of Devotion secured the number one slot on both sides of the Atlantic.

But the subsequent 14-month long 'Devotion Tour' would take its toll on the band.

Here is a clip from Enjoy The Silence, a track that sits at number 15 in Pitchfork Media's Top 200 Tracks of the 90s.

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #7 on: 28 July 2015 - 17:01:39 »
2015-07-23 - Mojo (UK) - How To Buy: Depeche Mode

[Bought by me in digital format from Zinio.]

http://gb.zinio.com/magazine/MOJO/pr-501039052/cat-cat1960020


Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #8 on: 11 August 2015 - 23:47:20 »
2015-08-11 - Rolling Stone (US) - Are Depeche Mode Metal's Biggest Secret Influence?

http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/are-depeche-mode-metals-biggest-secret-influence-20150811

Are Depeche Mode Metal's Biggest Secret Influence?
Inside heavy music's strange, surprising cult of Depeche Mode faithful with Marilyn Manson, Deftones, Rammstein and others
By Kory Grow

When Depeche Mode titled their 1990 album Violator, it was supposed to be taken ironically. The previous year had seen smarmy hair-mongers like Bon Jovi, Bad English and Poison scoring Number Ones with saccharine power balladry, and the leather-clad, synth-pop group had understandably "gotten enough." So they exacted vengeance on their album sleeve. "We wanted to come up with the most extreme, ridiculously heavy-metal title that we could," the band's chief songwriter, Martin Gore, told NME at the time. "I'll be surprised if people will get the joke." His skepticism was warranted.

In the 25 years since Depeche Mode officially became a phenomenon with a string of Violator singles like "Personal Jesus," "Enjoy the Silence" and "Policy of Truth," the band has inspired a strange, surprising cult following among headbangers and hard rockers. Marilyn Manson, Rammstein, Converge and even Mr. Power Ballad Himself, Sammy Hagar, have tackled Depeche Mode covers – most of which cull from Violator. Their love of the band is genuine. Singer Chino Moreno, who alternates between throat-shredding screams and Dave Gahan–like crooning with alt-metal group Deftones, even has Violator's cover flower tattooed on his bicep.

In hindsight, though, Depeche Mode's influence on the most extreme of music genres makes some sense. When the group formed in Basildon, about 30 miles east of London, in 1980, it played light-hearted new-wave pop songs like "Just Can't Get Enough" and "Dreaming of You" with keyboard parts that the band's Alan Wilder nonetheless later likened to blues and heavy-metal riffs. When founding member and original chief songwriter Vince Clarke left that year to form Yazoo, Gore took over songwriting duties and brought a darker sensibility to the group. "Rock musicians say you can't express yourself with a synthesizer," he told Sounds in 1981. "'Soulless' is the word. But what is there in whacking a guitar? Every heavy-metal riff sounds the same anyway." He proved his naysayers wrong.

Within the next couple of years, Depeche Mode became a force to be reckoned with on the pop charts, eventually making an impact in the U.S. with 1984's urgent-sounding plea for peace "People Are People." But in the U.K., they'd been putting out one high-charting single after another, many of which carry controversial themes including survival of the fittest ("Everything Counts"), bondage and discipline ("Master and Servant") and breaking free of groupthink ("Stripped"). Deeper cuts like "Fly on the Windscreen – Final" – which begins with the very metal line, "Death is everywheeerrre!" – tackle inevitable mortality.

Most chilling, though, was their 1984 single "Blasphemous Rumours," which tackled teenage suicide and mortality in the verses, which were bolstered by the chorus, "I don't want to start any blasphemous rumours/But I think that God's got a sick sense of humour/And when I die I expect to find Him laughing." That sentiment predates Slayer's "God Hates Us All" by almost two decades and the song bore the sort of scrutiny reserved for metal bands at the time. The BBC reportedly told the group's label that it couldn't play every single it got (though the song later reached Number 16 in the U.K.) and the tune got a good shaming in the band's hometown. "If we can say God so loved the world that He sent His only son, if He did that, He cannot have a sick sense of humor," a Basildon priest told the press at the time, according to the 1994 book Depeche Mode: Some Great Reward. It seemed the group's world-wary ethos threatened mainstream sensibilities and it mattered not a jot.

But while headbangers were singing about the same things and filling midsize venues with sweaty mosh-pit warriors, Depeche Mode were packing arenas and stadiums with screaming teenage girls singing their hits (even "Blasphemous Rumours"). Moreover, a reported 20,000 fans, many of whom had been waiting for days, showed up for a Depeche Mode record signing in Los Angeles when Violator came out, and the roar of the fans captured on the band's 1989 live album and video 101 is still echoing around the Pasadena Rose Bowl.

Their impact stretched far and wide during the lead-up to Violator's release, and it was around that time that it settled into the psyches of hard-rock and metal bands. The first notable hard rocker to sing their praises was Axl Rose, who in 1989, reportedly attempted to curry the band's favor by reciting the lyrics to their tender, hopeful love ballad "Somebody" to them at the 101 Hollywood premiere. Later that night, he brought them to the L.A. metal club the Cathouse but he soon lost their friendship. After the party, the Guns N' Roses singer reportedly attended a Beverly Hills barbecue where he allegedly shot a pig. Depeche Mode then released a statement to the U.K. press that, as vegetarians, they were "appalled" with him and did not want to be associated with him.

It was also around that time that people who would come to define metal over the next couple of decades became fans of the synth-pop group. Marilyn Manson fondly recalls seeing Depeche Mode in L.A. on their World Violation Tour, and Deftones' Moreno proudly says that that was the first concert he ever saw. "I fought my way to the front to be against the barricade," he tells Rolling Stone. "I have a feeling it's what launched me into wanting to make music, just by seeing the energy. It was just something else, one of my fondest and greatest memories of coming of age."

"Dave Gahan's voice was always attractive to me," says Burton Bell, who peppers industro-metal growls with full-throated, Depeche-y singing when fronting Fear Factory and identifies himself as a Mode fan from even before Violator. "He did not have a 'whiny' voice, which was popular for that genre of music during that time. He has a voice that resonated deep emotion and commitment. It's not really about what he was singing, but more about how he was singing it, that really made me a fan."

"It was different from anything that was going on at that time, and that's what drew me in," offers Ville Valo, frontman of the brooding Finnish "love-metal" group HIM, which once covered "Enjoy the Silence." "The uniqueness of Depeche Mode was similar to Black Sabbath. They gave us hope that you don't have to do exactly what the rest of the people are doing. They reinvented the wheel."

As with like-minded groups the Cure and New Order, Depeche Mode's mid-Eighties appeal to Future Metal Leaders of the World lied in an almost morbid, matter-of-fact gothy iconoclasm. What set them apart from their peers, though – other than a sparing use of guitar – were the ornate lattices of synthesizer counterpoints and clanging rhythms that defined their albums beginning with 1985's Some Great Reward (and its hit "People Are People") onward. It's a sound that has gone on to inspire many industrial bands, notably Nine Inch Nails and Ministry (though the latter, who started out sounding like Depeche Mode, would later disavow them). That sound would become increasingly sexually charged and trance-inducing on albums like 1986's Black Celebration, the following year's Music for the Masses and their masterpiece Violator.

"I don't know about what appeals to other bands, but for me, I think it's just music that you put on because it's got sex appeal to it," says Marilyn Manson, who covered "Personal Jesus" in 2004. "That's what inspired me about it. That and it has a hypnotic feel." The singer, who also cites a time he received "oral sex with a rosary bead around my dick" as inspiration for the cover, still plays "Personal Jesus" with a "southern Baptist bible-pulpit" approach. (It's worth noting that Gore drew inspiration not from Jesus Christ for the song but from Priscilla Presley's almost religious admiration for her onetime husband Elvis in her book Elvis & Me.)

Another artist who covered "Personal Jesus" but for a different reason is former Van Halen belter Sammy Hagar, who included a bluesy, hard-rock rendition of the tune on his 2013 solo covers comp Sammy Hagar & Friends. "A lot of people find it hard to believe I'm a fan," he says. "My oldest son, Aaron, actually turned me onto the band when he was little but it wasn't until I heard 'Personal Jesus' that I became a fan. It hit me how cool it sounded for an electronic band to play such a heavy blues groove. That riff always gets me."

Beyond the feel of the group's music, Depeche Mode's allure for modern heavy music artists also stems from Gore's cutting, moody, often personal lyrics. In metal's first two decades, the most successful bands had, by and large, lived out their fantasies in their lyrics, but at the start of the Nineties – as punk- and hardcore-influenced grunge bands threatened the futures of puffed-chest pop-metal groups with songs about (gasp!) their emotions – an influx of harder-edged bands, too, started singing about real life.

"Depeche Mode records are all a little bit personal and extremely powerful," says Converge frontman Jacob Bannon, whose histrionic hardcore-metal crossover group once covered Violator's Pink Floyd–referencing "Clean." "On Violator specifically, maybe it's the aesthetic, the character, the sort of battle between human darkness and temptation that's in there, I think those things just relate to a lot of artists that are making heavy music. The subject matters are essentially the same."

Similarly, the appeal of doing a "fully heavy" version of "Clean," to use Bannon's words, was the song's message. "It's talking about somebody trying to get emotionally, physically and spiritually clean," he says. "At least that's the interpretation and narrative that I wanted to explore with the song."

"My favorite music from them is a little unsettling," Moreno says. "It's darker-themed and there is a lot of love- and relationship-type things, but it's not happy music." With Deftones, Moreno has covered Music for the Masses' "To Have and to Hold" and Violator's "Sweetest Perfection." In 2013 he also sang Music for the Masses' "Behind the Wheel" with math-metal troupe Dillinger Escape Plan. "You never really know what they're singing about, they're never really just so open and out front about it," the Deftones singer says. "When you listened to them, you sort of ran with the mood of it and you connected it to wherever you were in your life at the time."

Moreno recalls attempting a version of Black Celebration's "Fly on the Windscreen" with Deftones when they were making their 1995 debut album, Adrenaline, but they never finished it or put it out. "It was our first try at doing something not so typical for a heavy band," he says. "Now we're known for doing covers that are not so typical of a hard-rock band."

The singer still recalls surprise that his bandmates would be open to trying something so outside of the heavy paradigm, saying that Deftones guitarist Stephen Carpenter had never heard of the group prior to meeting Moreno. That goes, too, for singer Cristina Scabbia and her bandmates in goth-metal  outfit Lacuna Coil, who scored a hit in the U.K. with their cover of Violator's "Enjoy the Silence," the most verbose song extoling the virtues of quietude since Simon and Garfunkel's "Sounds of Silence." "Marco [Biazzi], our bass player, who arranged the music was not a big fan of them," she says. "He respects them but he wasn't a fan to start with. But the alchemy worked out perfectly.

"With some songs you get that special feeling," she continues, explaining why she picked "Enjoy the Silence." "Depeche Mode write songs with notes that just hit you right in the heart. They are sometimes melancholic. I don't know if it's part of human nature to like to suffer a little bit but to me it's like that when I listen to music, because I like to listen to the heart of every song."

"'Enjoy the Silence' is one of those songs that sounds so overwhelming that your heart seems to burst when you hear it," says HIM's Valo, who covered the song in part "to get the girls interested" in his band. "It has very simple melodies and lyrics, too."

Another artist who recalls getting resistance initially to covering Depeche Mode is Rammstein guitarist Richard Kruspe. He discovered the synth-pop group while growing in the former East Germany where it was difficult to find records by his favorite bands; nevertheless he became a fan after seeing them perform "People Are People" on TV and, in 1998, he convinced his industrial-metal group to take on Black Celebration's "Stripped." "I even paid them money to do it," he jokes.

But even once the rest of Rammstein were on board, he had to make a concession with the way the song was recorded. "I remember going into the studio and Till [Lindemann, vocals] was trying to sing 'Stripped down to the bone' and for hours he couldn't get rid of this thick, German accent," Kruspe says. "So we eliminated the 'down to the bone part.'"

For his part, Lindemann says he has come around to Depeche Mode, save one thing. "They don't have guitars and when you play metal, you want to hear a guitar, so it demands a cover version," he says. "But Depeche Mode are the best band without guitars where it's still working."

The fact that Depeche Mode's sound is so delicate and malleable is also why the theatrical heavy-metal group Ghost attempted Violator's tender "Waiting for the Night" on their 2013 covers EP, If You Have Ghost, which featured Dave Grohl on rhythm guitar. "It had a lot of body to explore, since it's very ambient and sonically sparse," one of the group's so-called Nameless Ghouls says. "When we got into the studio with Dave Grohl, we toyed with the idea to sludge it out to a really doomy metal song, and I think we did rather well. The original though has a unique, nocturnal 'listen in bed in the dark before you go to sleep' quality to it, though, that we never achieved. It's a very beautiful song."

"Depeche Mode's music is not tied to a certain period of time or fad," Valo says. "That's the magic of the band, to be able to cater to a unique world and existence. Whenever you can open a door by listening to music, you're sucked in, and often, you go from this everyday dreary, gray existence, and that's the beauty of Depeche Mode."

Despite the admiration Depeche Mode have received from hard-rock and metal fans, the group's Martin Gore remains ambivalent about the appeal of their music to a genre that seems so diametrically opposite of his own. Earlier this year, the singer told Rolling Stone he's amazed with the number of requests in general he gets from artists wanting to cover his songs. "The majority of them, I have to say, I don't particularly like," he said. "But I usually approve them, because they're my fans. Nobody's going to want to cover something unless they're actually a fan. To say, 'No, you can't release that because I don't like it,' I think, is just a bit unfair so I always approve them.

"Metal bands and Susan Boyle," Gore said with a laugh. "When people ask us about our influence, the thing I'm most proud of is the fact we seem to have influenced people right across the board in all different genres of music."

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #9 on: 02 September 2015 - 01:05:57 »
2015-08-31 - Muzikus.cz (Czech Republic) - Interview with Steve Lyon

http://www.muzikus.cz/pro-muzikanty-clanky/Steve-Lyon-producent-nejen-Depeche-Mode-a-Davida-Kollera~31~srpen~2015/

(...)

Když si vezmeme The Cure, zrovna byli ve fázi, kdy se sestava prakticky rozpadla a byla zde touha po změně. Jaký přístup jsi zvolil v jejich případě, když ti dávali najevo otevřenost vůči novému pracovnímu přístupu?
Když jsme šli tehdy s frontmanem Robertem Smithem na pivo, byli tehdy v kapele jen dva. (smích) Dokonce tehdy uvažoval o sólové desce a název Wild Mood Swings si schovával přesně pro tyhle účely. S kluky z Depeche Mode se potkal v New Yorku a ptal se po mně. Měl jsem z The Cure pocit, že se znovu hledají, protože z kapely se stala směska starých a nových členů. Robert v jednu chvíli dokonce přizval mého kamaráda Alana Wildera, který zrovna opustil Depeche Mode. K naší spolupráci jsem přinesl mnoho nápadů, ale Robert je mozek kapely a písně jsou jeho. Přistoupil jsem dokonce na postup, že se mixu ujme více lidí a pak budeme porovnávat výsledky. Dalo by se říct, že se dalo album stihnout mnohem rychleji, ale postup si volí autor.

(...)

Podmínky jsou vždy odlišné a umělec není schopen ovlivnit názory na muziku, jakmile vyjde. Tak proč se stresovat?
Tvé jméno je však nejvíce spojováno s Depeche Mode. Jak se ti podařilo s nimi vybudovat tak dlouhotrvající vztah? Pokud se nemýlím, vůbec jsi je neznal, dokud se ti neozvali...
Přesně tak. Neměl jsem ponětí, s kým mám tu čest, dokud jsme nezačali pracovat na albu Violator. Abych byl přesný, Alan Wilder a producent Flood mě požádali, abych nahrál zpěvy a dělal technika přibližně na měsíc. Nakonec se naše první spolupráce protáhla na tři měsíce a několik bonusových skladeb. Následně mě Alan požádal, abych se postaral o produkci zvuku na nadcházejícím turné. Něco jsem od nich zaslechl už dříve, ale moc dobře si pamatuju na to, jak jsem poprvé zaslechl píseň Personal Jesus. Alan mi poslal singl, a když jsem si ho pustil, úplně mě to odrovnalo. Ty skladby jsou neskutečné a hrozně mě zaujal jejich inovátorský přístup, ze kterého jsem se moc naučil. Následující deska Songs of Faith and Devotion byla ve své podstatě úplně jiná. Flood a Alan mi takhle jednou zavolali a zajímali se, zdali bychom mohli natáčet mimo tradiční studiové prostory. Hodně jsme improvizovali, ale všechno nakonec vyšlo. Jistě, všechno nebylo napsané včas a občas jsme nestíhali, ale lidé se mění a stejně tak hudba. Velmi rád jsem s nimi pracoval a byla to sice velmi náročná, ale také zábavná zkušenost. Jak jistě víš, pracoval jsem s nimi šest let ve studiu i naživo, ale také i na sólové desce Alana a v neposlední řadě s Alanem a Floodem na projektu Nitzer Ebb. Jsem na to období, nebál bych se říct nejslavnější v jejich kariéře, velmi hrdý.

Fanouškem Depeche Mode ses stal, jako i mnozí jiní, velmi rychle. Jak se ti daří udržovat si od svých oblíbenců profesionální odstup?
To je pro mě překvapivě snadné. Základem je nemyslet na předchozí úspěchy ve své kariéře nebo aktuálního klienta. Podmínky jsou vždy odlišné a umělec není schopen ovlivnit názory na muziku, jakmile deska vyjde. Tak proč se stresovat? Fanouškovství je podle mě jen další přísun motivace a ke všem svým spolupracím přistupuju stejně.

Skladbu Personal Jesus jsme již zmínili, ale mohl bys, prosím, přiblížit našim čtenářům vznik dalšího legendárního hitu, a to Enjoy the Silence?
Když jsme se seznámili, většina skladeb již byla v zárodku. Každá byla v různých fázích produkce, ale k cíli to bylo ještě hodně daleko. S Alanem a Floodem jsme fungovali pod dohledem kapely jako výborný tým. Osobně jsem přinesl trochu odlišný přístup, a hlavně zrychlení pracovního procesu, kdy jsme fungovali v různém složení. Těžko se to vysvětluje, ale já se při práci nestresuju. Prostě jedu v tempu, protože miluju zvukový design, který mi nabízí spektrum možností ve velmi krátkém čase. Pro každou spolupráci připravím spektrum možností na svém ovládacím pultu, od efektů přes zesilovače až po snadný přechod mezi digitálním nahráváním a analogem. Když kapela zrovna touží po nových zvukových možnostech a nápadech, jsem schopen jim jich nabídnout hned celou řadu. Veškerá vina tak poté padá na mě. (smích)

(...)

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #10 on: 29 September 2015 - 03:01:08 »
2015-09-27 - PIAS (Belgium) - DANIEL MILLER: ‘I WAS DETERMINED TO MAKE MUTE A SUCCESS’

(...)

How did you meet Depeche Mode?

Fad Gadget’s single came out in 1979 and we started working with a couple of other artists – D.A.F, significantly, which was the first album release on Mute.
Fad Gadget made our second album, and he was promoting it doing gigs around London. He was booked to play The Bridge House in Canning Town.
The guy who booked it, Terry Murphy, was a real East End guy, who liked to support East End musicians; he knew Frank’s father, who was a big East End figure working in Smithfield’s market.
Terry booked Depeche Mode to support because they were from Basildon, Essex, which was an East End overspill town. I saw them during the soundcheck and they looked really dodgy, in homemade New Romantic clothes. They also looked really young.
They had three little synths supported on beer crates, and the lead singer had a light that he shone upwards to make himself look gothic. But when they came on stage that night, I watched the first song and just thought: ‘What?! That’s fucking incredible! What the hell’s that? I’m sure it will go downhill from here.’
But it didn’t – it just got better and better.
Most of the songs they played in their 30-minute set ended up on the first album. I couldn’t believe what I’d heard; great songs, unbelievably well-arranged. I went backstage and said: ‘Hi, I’m Daniel from Mute. I really enjoyed it.’
They were being all cool, but said: ‘We’re playing here again next week supporting someone else.’ So I told them I’d come down. I took a couple of people with me including NON – Boyd Rice – who was a big pop fan, and my first employee, Hildi Svengard.
They both said: ‘Daniel, you’ve got to do this.’ I went back and said to the band: ‘Do you fancy doing a single?’ They said yes, and it was Dreaming Of Me.

You were early to sign them…

I remember, typical of the British press, that there was an article [on the next wave of supposed New Romantics]. Depeche did a gig at The Hope & Anchor in Islington: Roger Ames came down, so did Chris Briggs – all these major label A&Rs were there, all trying to sign the band.
At the end of the gig, I went back stage and all these people were already in the dressing room saying: ‘Mute’s a nice little label, but they’ll never get you any success. There’s only two people working for it.’
The band just said: ‘Yeah, but we’re going to stick with them for the moment, see how it goes.’
They put their trust in me and I wanted to return that trust by doing the best that we could do. I was determined to make it a success… I was convinced we could do it on our own. The majors were so arrogant and condescending, I thought: ‘Fuck you.’
The band were offered quite big advances [which they turned down to stay with Mute]. We didn’t have a contract, no lawyers, no managers: we sold a fuck of a lot of records and they made a good amount of money without any of them.

(...)

What’s the biggest-selling Mute album of all time?

It must be Violator. That sold around 10m or 11m.
[Moby’s] Play worldwide was the same, but we didn’t have the rights for north America.

(...)

Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #11 on: 12 November 2015 - 21:37:24 »
2015-11-11 - GoodTimes Edition The 80s (Germany) - Der Aufstieg aus der Sub-Kultur zu Superstars

[Bought by me, scanned by Stay Depeched.]







Offline Angelinda

  • Assistant
  • Damaged People
  • ****
  • Posts: 12817
  • Gender: Female
Re: 2015: Other News
« Reply #12 on: 11 December 2015 - 19:55:44 »
2015-12-03 - Synthetics magazine (Germany) - Depeche Mode: The Synthetics Years 7

[Thanks to Anne for scanning this for this forum!]