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Author Topic: 1991: Depeche Mode - Death's Door (Until the End of the World soundtrack)  (Read 4174 times)

Offline Angelinda

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This thread contains all known news items regarding Depeche Mode's contribution to the star-studded soundtrack "Until the End of the World", which was a soundtrack for Wim Wenders's eponymous film.

Please let me know if you have more news items.
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Offline Angelinda

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1991-03-31 - Depeche Mode - Bong Convention Greetings

http://www.depechemode.com/video/exclusives/1991conventionvideo.html

[In this video, Alan is explaining all about the process of making Death's Door.]

Bong Convention Greetings (1991)
Video Recorded: 1991
Video Director: n/a
Video Source: PAL VHS

This video was originally shown only one time, during the Third Annual Bong Convention. The greetings of the band were shown to those fans attending the official convention. This video has not been seen since.
 
The clip is made up of four parts:
 
- Alan, in the studio, working on "Death's Door".
- Martin, in front of a pool table.
- Andy, at his new truck driving job.
- David, at his home, walking through his house with the camcorder.
 
An extra special thanks to JD Fanger for finding this tape (and to Lynn and Michaela of Bong as well).

 View Video

Bong Convention Greetings (1991)
(running time: 7:33 | file size: 25.744 meg)
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Offline Angelinda

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1991-06-23 - MTV (U.S.) - 120 Minutes

http://www.depechemode.com/video/television/120minutes_062391.html

[In clip 4, Martin and Andy talk about the Death's Door track.]


120 Minutes (MTV/USA - June 23rd, 1991)
Video Broadcast Date: June 23rd, 1991
Video Broadcast Network: MTV (U.S.A.)
Video Director: n/a
Video Source: NTSC VHS tape

MTV ran a contest (see the commercial for the Naked Power Grab contest here) back in 1991. The winner (Kirk Demoruelle) got the chance to run Mute Records for a week.
 
This was the third 120 Minutes show that showed what Kirk was doing. In this show, you will see interviews with Martin and Andy at Mute, and Alan (with Nitzer Ebb) at Konk Studios in London.
 
The show has been broken up into seven section to ease in web viewing. Those sections are:
 
Clip 1 - Introduction
Clip 2 - Interview with Martin and Andy (segment one)
Clip 3 - Interview with Martin and Andy (segment two)
Clip 4 - Interview with Martin and Andy (segment three)
Clip 5 - Interview with Douglas and Bon (Nitzer Ebb)
Clip 6 - Interview with Alan Wilder
Clip 7 - Ending

 View Videos

120 Minutes (MTV/USA - June 23rd, 1991) - Part 1
(running time: 2:24 | file size: 7.056 meg)
120 Minutes (MTV/USA - June 23rd, 1991) - Part 2
(running time: 2:13 | file size: 6.622 meg)
120 Minutes (MTV/USA - June 23rd, 1991) - Part 3
(running time: 1:04 | file size: 3.268 meg)
120 Minutes (MTV/USA - June 23rd, 1991) - Part 4
(running time: 2:33 | file size: 7.6 meg)
120 Minutes (MTV/USA - June 23rd, 1991) - Part 5
(running time: 3:02 | file size: 8.966 meg)
120 Minutes (MTV/USA - June 23rd, 1991) - Part 6
(running time: 2:51 | file size: 8.466 meg)
120 Minutes (MTV/USA - June 23rd, 1991) - Part 7
(running time: 0:32 | file size: 1.636 meg)
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Offline Angelinda

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1991-07-28 - LA Times (US) - Rock Stars Celebrate 'End of the World'

http://articles.latimes.com/1991-07-28/entertainment/ca-310_1_stars-world-rock

Rock Stars Celebrate 'End of the World'
POP EYE July 28, 1991|PATRICK GOLDSTEIN

When we first heard the roll call, we thought for sure someone had already booked the talent for next year's Rock and Roll Hall of Fame dinner. Where else could you find U2, Talking Heads, R.E.M., Peter Gabriel, Elvis Costello, Neneh Cherry, Depeche Mode, Patti Smith, k.d. lang and Jane Siberry and Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds all on the same package?

That's the superstar congregation you'll hear in Wim Wenders' upcoming film, "Until the End of the World," due this November from Warner Bros. With a few possible exceptions, the same lineup will be on the soundtrack album, tentatively scheduled for release in late October.

So how did Wenders, best known as director of such films as "Wings of Desire" and "Paris, Texas," attract such an all-star cast?

"Frankly, a lot of the songs came about simply because Wim was already good friends with a lot of the artists," explains Sharon Boyle, the film's music supervisor. "R.E.M. and Wim are old friends, as are David Byrne and Wim . . . and Bono . . . and Peter Gabriel and. . . ."

As it turns out, the soundtrack project hinged on a lot more than Wenders' personal relationships. Many artists he hadn't met agreed to contribute songs, either because they appreciated his films or because they were impressed by his obvious enthusiasm for pop music.

Eager to have Depeche Mode involved, Wenders followed the group around Europe, finally catching a concert somewhere in Germany. He enjoyed the show, but never met the band--with all the pandemonium, he couldn't get backstage to see them.

Impressed by such gestures, a host of gifted artists not only committed to the project but willingly crafted their songs to fit Wenders' film. Many artists, including Smith, Cherry and Cave, recorded several optional mixes. Depeche Mode cut five different versions of their song, "Death's Door," including separate acoustic and electric renditions.

"Wim has really involved the music in the film--it's not an afterthought," says Boyle, who did the music for such soundtracks as "Something Wild," "The Hot Spot" and "The Silence of the Lambs." "Most of the songs are used more than once in the film, often once with vocals and once as instrumentals. They fit so closely with the mood of each scene that it's as if the songs are miniature theme music for each part of the picture."

Many of the songs, which include the U2 title track, R.E.M.'s "Fretless" and Cherry's "Move With Me," are originals (the lone cover song is Costello's remake of the Kinks' "Days"). Most were submitted, in rough-mix form, to Wenders, who would suggest changes or steer the song in a direction more appropriate for the movie.

Better still, many artists worked for what Boyle termed "considerably less" than their customary pay scale. At normal rates, a superstar-studded soundtrack could have easily cost more than $1 million--but "World" came in at slightly under $500,000.

The biggest headache, as always, has been scheduling. Pop stars will contribute a new song to a soundtrack, but only as long as it comes out after their own album is released. Because of such contractual stipulations, Wenders lost several key artists, most notably Peter Gabriel and Robbie Robertson, whose albums have been delayed until next year. (Wenders can still use their songs in the film, just not on the album.)


Right now, the filmmakers' biggest concern involves the U2 title track, which can only be used if the soundtrack is released after U2's album is released. U2 now says its the album will be out Oct. 8, but Boyle has her fingers crossed.

"I keep saying, 'Come on, U2! Let's go!' " she says with a laugh. "It's really going to make our life easier if it comes out on time."

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Offline Angelinda

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1992-03-xx - BONG (UK) - BONG 16

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]

[The track Death's Door was already announced in BONG 13, and in BONG 16 a flexidisc containing this track was included, as can be see on this page from this issue:]

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Offline Angelinda

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1992-04-17 - KROQ (US) - Radio interview with Alan Wilder

[Taken from the now-defunct website www.sacreddm.net.]

[We don't have the audio file, but a transcript appeared in BONG 17:]

(...)

RB: Okay, and the final Depeche question: Were you involved with “Death’s Door” on the soundtrack of “Until The End Of The World” and what did you think of the single?

AW: Yes, we recorded that but it wasn’t really a single, Richard.

RB: Well, we played it like one.

AW: Yes, I know you did. We recorded that back in April or March last year, and we were pleased with it. We did it quite quickly and eventually it ended up on the soundtrack album which didn’t come out until a lot later. I haven’t even seen the film yet, but I’d be interested to see it.

RB: Well, from what we’ve been reading about the reviews, the soundtrack is by far better than the movie, which is a shame because Wim Wenders has done some great stuff in the past such as Wings [Of Desire], etc…

AW: I hear it’s a very long film.



(...)
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Offline Angelinda

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1993-03-xx - KROQ (US) - Dave & Martin interview with Richard Blade and Jed the Fish

This radio interview is not hosted online, but in it Martin says:
"We literally did nothing for a whole year apart from the song for the Wim Wenders film, which only took us about 2 days to do, so we really had about 363 days off (laughs).
I think that was actually the first showing of a gospel direction, I think it had a real sort of gospel feel to it that pointed the way to this album [SOFAD]."
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Offline Angelinda

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1993-05-xx - Video Pulse! Magazine (U.S.) - Depeche Mode Discovers Guitars

http://www.tuug.utu.fi/~jaakko/dm/dmtekstit/fashion.txt

(...)

Even pop-culture's intelligentsia have caught the bug.  Producer Brian Eno, whose '92 Never Net album shows him to be more comfortable than Gore with the 'Godfather of Rave' title, contributed two resoundingly ambient remixes of the otherwise pile-driving 'I feel you,' the first single off the new album. And last year, film director Wim Wenders (Paris, Texas, Wings of
Desire), who had worked previously with Depeche Mode fellow Mute Records compatriots Nike Cave and Bliza Bargeld, struggled for months to tempt the band from a year's sabbatical to contribute a song to his movie, Until the End of The World. He received 'Death's Door,' one of the band's best, a Kurt Weill-flavord firge whose bluesy flavor and acoustic sensibility heralded
the band's new direction on Songs of Faith and Devotion, with its hallmark gospel, blues and swaggering guitars.

(...)
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Offline Angelinda

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2011-11-15 - Movieline (US) - Interview with Wim Wenders

http://movieline.com/2011/11/15/wim-wenders-on-until-the-end-of-the-world-at-20-its-amazing-soundtrack-and-loving-lulu/

Interviews || By: S.T. VanAirsdale || November 15, 2011 10:30 AM EDT
Wim Wenders on Until the End of the World at 20, Its Amazing Soundtrack, and Loving LuLu

Director Wim Wenders has made his best-received film in years with Pina, a bold, beautiful 3-D tribute to his late friend and collaborator, the German choreographer Pina Bausch. But 2011 also marks the 20th anniversary of an even more ambitious -- if eminently troubled -- Wenders work loaded with cutting-edge visuals, music and concepts.


Until the End of the World was conceived over most of the '80s, filmed on four continents (including video smuggled out of China), and foresaw a future abetted by such diversions as mobile viewing devices, proto-GPS and a highly sought-after contraption that records images for the blind. Starring William Hurt, Sam Neill, Solveig Dommartin, Jeanne Moreau and Max von Sydow among an international ensemble of actors, the film also skyrocketed to a $23 million budget and found its distributors -- including Warner Bros. in the United States -- requiring cuts that reduced it to barely a quarter of Wenders's original vision. Later locked in at just under five hours, it's the type of material that today would be a shoo-in for a cable miniseries that could probably win Emmys for everyone involved. Twenty years on, however, it's relatively lost to the mainstream, with Wenders's directors cut as yet unreleased outside two territories in Europe.

A handful of screenings over the years have exposed Until the End of the World to contemporary audiences, but at least we'll always have its soundtrack -- a moody pop collage of Lou Reed, U2, R.E.M., Talking Heads, Patti Smith, Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds, Elvis Costello, Depeche Mode and other artists that hasn't aged a bit in 20 years. Talking to Wenders last week about Pina (which opens next month; look for more on the film here at that time), I asked the director to reflect on the epic that remains embattled to this day.

Two decades on, what are your thoughts on the reception and legacy of Until the End of the World?

Well, it is still by far the most ambitious thing I ever did. I look at it like that. It's a work that's very dear to me, though I must that I was forced by the studios worldwide and my co-producers at the time to shorten it down to something that was like a Reader's Digest of the movie. The film that's in distribution ever since 1991 is a far cry away from what was actually shot. The only film that represents that is my director's cut, which is twice as long -- which is five hours. The film has strange insights into the future. If you look at the people running around looking at their little monitors in front of them all the time, that's what you see in the streets today everywhere -- that sort of addiction to the computer image. You'll find that in many young people today. It's a real disease. And the main technology in the film -- to make a blind person see, or to extract images from the brain of a person -- that's what scientists do. It's the very same technology today, in 2011. I've had several scientific reports of the first images drawn out of a person's brain, strictly represented by brainwaves. And they gave imagery that looked exactly like what we'd done in the film. So it's funny how science fiction eventually becomes reality.

Do you feel like that film is underappreciated, or that there's a way you might try to revive that director's cut somehow -- particularly considering what you just mentioned?

I hope that one day that the long version comes out on Blu-ray. I'm not really into reviving the Reader's Digest because of the way I feel about it. I had to do it myself. If I hadn't cut it down to two and a half hours myself, somebody else would have done that. I thought I'd rather kill my own baby then let somebody else slaughter it. I never saw that short version after that. I didn't even go to any screenings when the film was released. I didn't want to see it. It was too painful. So I made the director's cut two years later, but it was hard to impose it because the distributors had the rights to the other one, and there was no director's cut foreseen in the contract. So I could only really release it in the two territories I controlled, which at the time was Germany and Italy. But I hope eventually the film will see the light of day in other territories -- at least on Blu-ray. I don't think a film of five hours realistically has any chance to have theatrical distribution.

There's a beautiful print of it at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. They have the only print of mine, and I'm very grateful that they have it. It's there, and anybody who would want to screen it could get it from the Academy. But realistically a film like this doesn't have any chance to be seen on the screen. But I hope one day for a Blu-ray.

Probably its most enduring legacy is its soundtrack. I've got it represented on almost every playlist of mine. How did that come together?

It sounds like it was 10 times more successful than the movie. If as many people bought the soundtrack had watched the movie, I would have been very happy!
It really is one of the best ever.

It's a beautiful soundtrack. It was made in sort of an adventurous way, because all these bands that I was listening to when I was making the movie, a lot of them were my friends. So that was the music I carried with me during the making of this science-fiction film. And when I was editing it, I figured that was contemporary music. I mean, U2 and R.E.M. and Lou Reed and all the stuff that was in the film that I was looking to, I figured I can't put it into the film if the film takes place in the year 2000. I'd better ask these guys if they could project themselves 10 years into the future and write a song that, like the movie itself, made an effort to look into the future. I asked... Let me think. I asked 18 bands to consider a proposition of writing a song that could represent their music 10 years from then, really thinking that only half of them would respond if I was lucky. But they all responded except two, and I got 16 tracks -- one more beautiful than the other. That was one of the heartbreaking things about the Reader's Digest version: Some of these beautiful songs, in that version, only appear for 10 seconds. So another reason to make the full version of the film was to let the music blossom and finally show what the intention was with all that fantastic music.

That's so weird about envisioning 10 in the future. R.E.M.'s song ("Fretless") doesn't even have drums, and they lost Bill Berry around the end of the decade.

It's funny. And there are some other things like that, where bands actually did something that had something to do with what they were making in 2000. It was adventurous, and I'm eternally grateful to all these guys to take my proposition seriously and really project themselves. Even U2's title track, "Until the End of the World" -- if they released that today, people would say, "Wow." Even today it's a little futuristic.

Have you heard Lou Reed's new collaboration with Metallica?

Oh, yes. I'm listening to it every day! I rented a different car, because I realized... [Laughs] I'm here in L.A., and I'm staying in this hotel, and I don't have a sound system. So I needed a car with a good stereo system to allow me to play LuLu loud, because it's ridiculous to hear LuLu in a regular car. So I rented a much more expensive car so that it would have a good sound system so I could actually listen to LuLu loud. So I'm driving around the city with LuLu very loud! It's fantastic! I love it.

Really?

It is a funky thing. I've never heard Lou Reed sing like this! And I've known him for so long, and I love The Velvet Underground. But Lou Reed was never belting out like that. It's like he finally was carried by another force that let him sing like this. And of course there is a little retro thing to the sound of Metallica. I mean, I like them, but they haven't really changed their sound. But the combination is still really utterly fascinating.

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