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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #720 on: 26 September 2017 - 04:23:34 »
2017-09-26 - Q Magazine (UK) - Exclusive Depeche Mode interview

[Bought in digital format on www.zinio.com, with the text extracted from the digital issue.]











Cover Story: Depeche Mode
The Black Celebration
"We're more than a band. We're a cult."
Exclusive! All their secrets revealed...
We join the band in New York and on tour in Canada to hear how the dysfunctional trio have overcome heroin, alcoholism and breakdowns to become one of the world’s biggest bands.
Photographs: Alex Lake

BACKSTAGE: “I’m standing backstage at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre waiting for Depeche Mode to take to the stage. Earlier I’d photographed the band for the cover of this issue. Now five hours later I’m standing by the stage door and first to appear are Martin and Fletch, relaxed, strolling from the dressing rooms towards me. You hear Dave Gahan long before you see him. The yells and cries of a man hyping himself up for the stage. Suddenly there is a blur of red and a cackle of laughter as he appears in the corridor, illuminated in the overhead strip light where I catch a couple of frames. He really is like a caged animal and the roar from the crowd when they take to the stage is insane. The energy between band and crowd was like nothing I’ve seen. Dave attacks it with the feral energy of a man touring his first album, not the 14th. If you ever want to see a band play each gig like it’s their last, this is it. Incredible.”
Alex Lake, Q Chief Photographer

At the core of every great group, there is a dysfunctional relationship that’s being managed against all odds. Titans of dark electro-pop Depeche Mode epitomise this. They’ve beaten heroin, alcoholism and breakdowns to be bigger now in middle-age than ever. Niall Doherty travels to New York to hear singer Dave Gahan’s key to survival, and then joins the trio on tour. “I’m very placid,” sound architect Martin Gore tells him. “Which comes in handy in Depeche Mode.”

SOON AFTER he’d arrived home in New York from a recent Depeche Mode tour, Dave Gahan received an email from Martin Gore. “I enjoy being onstage with you,” wrote Gore to his bandmate. “You are taking it to another level, I don’t know how you do it.” “I don’t know how I do it either,” the singer replied, “but something comes over me onstage up there. It’s like a Peter Pan thing.” It is almost 40 years since Gahan, Gore, Andy “Fletch” Fletcher and early departee Vince Clarke formed their trailblazing electronic band in Basildon, Essex and the brotherly, often fractious relationship between Gahan and Gore is at the heart of what makes them tick.
Gahan realised long ago that it doesn’t matter whether the band like each other or not, it’s the chemistry that counts. He’s reminded of it every night on tour, greeted by the hysterical faces in the front rows of their sold-out shows. Over nearly four decades and 14 studio albums, Depeche Mode have sold more than 100 million records and their synth sound has helped to reshape modern music. They are the ultimate cult band, pioneers who have left their mark on a range of artists far more recognisable than they ever will be. You can hear them in the communal pop of Lady Gaga, the bombastic rock of Muse, the industrial thud of Nine Inch Nails and the fist-clenched anthems of The Killers. Their fans are diehards who know every word and the band are as popular as they’ve ever been, playing packed arenas and stadiums around the world.
But Dave Gahan knows this can’t go on forever. The singer feels the band are living on borrowed time, and he appreciates it now more than he ever has. Depeche Mode have triumphed over heroin and alcohol addiction, nervous breakdowns, cancer scares, failed marriages and members leaving. Now, at the very top of their game, it feels like they might be reaching the end.

New York, July 2017. It is a scorching summer’s day, and the guests entering the palatial, airconditioned lobby of the Crosby Street Hotel look relieved to be out of the heat. Dave Gahan lives a stroll away with his wife Jennifer, daughter Stella Rose and adopted son Jimmy. He likes sitting in places like this, watching and listening to people, getting ideas for songs. He’s been home for a few days as the band take some time off before resuming the world tour to accompany their latest album Spirit, and he’s still readjusting to life as a mere mortal rather than the flamboyant frontman of Depeche Mode. Life on the road is relatively monastic for the singer these days, his whole day geared towards being in tip-top condition for showtime. “All I really care about when I’m on the road is the show,” he says, settling into a seat in the hotel’s restaurant. Dressed in a white T-shirt and black jeans, he’s as slight as a 55-year-old man could be. He has the frame of a ballerina and the inflection of a cabbie. He keeps his sunglasses on. “It used to be lots of other things, but now it’s all I care about. How can I do the best performance? I’m old now, there are lots of things I have to do.” On tour, he wakes up at 9am, drinks a lot of water, has an omelette for breakfast, does some stretching and yoga, then starts to get his head into gig mode. “You have to be all-in,” he says. “It’s all or nothing. I have a lot of fun with it and let go of any inhibitions I have onstage. I know I’m good at what I do.”
Gahan blagged his way into the band from the beginning. “They were already a band, Vince, Fletch and Martin. They needed a front guy. I was an Essex lad. Vince thought he heard me singing ‘Heroes’ by David Bowie in a rehearsal room next door with this other band.” He says he was technically singing it, but others were too. When Clarke technically asked if it was him, he claimed the glory. “I had nothing else going on,” he says. Clarke was being smart when he invited Gahan to join the band. He knew that Gahan knew the right people in Basildon and Southend-on-Sea to get them gigs.
Propelled by early hits Just Can’t Get Enough and New Life, they were a pop success – Fletcher has described them as “the world’s first boyband” – and spent much of their formative years doing what pop successes were expected to do. There were many awkward appearances on Saturday morning kids shows. “In those early years, we’d do anything,” says Gahan. “If someone said to us, go on Swap Shop, we’d be there. And we always felt uncomfortable. Of course it’s me at the front, like a fish out of water. All the teenybop stuff was weird.” There is one excruciating interview online from 1985, with Gahan interviewing ex-bandmate Clarke on live TV. It’s uncomfortable viewing even before Timmy Mallett turns up and pretends to serve them tea. 
Gahan credits Daniel Miller, the Mute label boss who has acted as a mentor throughout the band’s career, for steering them towards being more creatively daring. “Full respect to Dan,” says Gahan. “If he hadn’t have found us and took us under his wing, God knows what would’ve happened. We would’ve been some awful fucking Spandau Ballet, Duran Duran-type thing.”
Gahan’s voice is a composite of 90 per cent Essex and 10 per cent New York. It’s always a bit of a surprise when his Estuary twang is suddenly ambushed by a New York drawl. Ordering some drinks, he says “can ah’ get a boh’l ah still waugh’a,” in pure East Ender, before switching to a Transatlantic, “and a ka’fee?” His natural speaking voice is like when Ray Winstone tries to do an American accent. There’s a tenderness and slight jitteriness to Gahan. Even when he’s extolling the thrill of playing to 50,000 people, you want to interrupt to check he’s alright.
Suddenly, Nine Inch Nails’ singer Trent Reznor appears in the restaurant and beckons him over to say hello. A few minutes later, Gahan returns and explains the awkward situation that just played out. Reznor had to introduce him to his associate, the producer Alan Moulder, despite the fact Moulder has worked with Depeche Mode on numerous occasions. “I didn’t recognise him,” admits Gahan. It’s not the first time something like this has happened. It is bittersweet for Gahan that the band’s imperial phase came at a time when his heroin addiction was so bad he has trouble recalling much of it.
“There are periods when I bump into people like this and they mention something and I’m like, ‘I don’t remember that.’ There was a period when I was too out there to really appreciate how good it is.”
Gahan went off the deep end for the first half of the ’90s. He remembers leaving the country house in Sussex he lived in with his first wife Jo and son Jack to embark on the tour to support Violator and looking back and thinking, “I’m not coming back here.”
“And that’s what happened,” he said. “Once we went on the [1993 album] Songs Of Faith And Devotion tour, I don’t remember much about it. Once that shift changed for me, where the drugs were more important than anything, I knew I was lost. I knew it, but I couldn’t stop. I tried, but I didn’t care about anything. I don’t even know how I maintained that.”
It’s a testament to Gahan’s constitution that if you search for footage of the Devotional tour shows on YouTube, he’s fantastic. He had transformed from a gawky young frontman into a fully-fledged rock god, the sort of gloriously clichéd showman that Hollywood screenwriters come up with when they write a rock singer. “I’d put everything I had into it,” says Gahan. “There would be problems, definitely. A lot of hospital visits. I didn’t think nothing of it, I thought I was invincible. I soon found out, in the mid-’90s, that that was not the case. I’ve been very lucky. If I didn’t have all this and all the attention and people wanting me to do well, I’d have been dead years ago. No one would give a shit, some guy from Essex, a kid in a council flat.”
A few years ago, Gahan was in London for Gore and Fletcher’s joint 50th birthday party. He had Jimmy and Stella Rose with him and wanted to show them where he grew up, so he took them for a drive to Basildon. “I went back to that little house and the little bit of grass at the front and I was like, ‘How did we all live in that little house?’” His son pointed at the row of terraces and said, “So that’s where you lived?” “No,” said Gahan, “that bit there is another house, it’s not one house.” He looked around the block, across the road, and nodded at the mum sitting out on the lawn with a kid on her lap. No one recognised him.
Recently, he was watching Supersonic, Mat Whitecross’s film about Oasis. He thinks Liam and Noel Gallagher have “just gotta fucking talk. The ego stuff will always be there but the music is more important.” He says it’s like a brother situation with him and Gore. They know each other and yet they don’t. “We’re very similar,” he says. “We’re two drunks trying to do it a little different. He liked booze, I liked drugs. I liked booze too, but I liked drugs more.”
He and Gore have always had a “weird” relationship and there has been extra tension since Gahan began writing songs for inclusion on Depeche Mode albums in 2005. During the making of Spirit, he and chief songwriter Gore “had it out”. “Mart was just like, ‘This is what I do, I write the songs and I can’t do it onstage without you, that’s what you do, we do it together.’ He said, ‘Your songs are really good, but I need this.’” The talk cleared the air. “I love the communication of a musical idea,” says Gahan. “We don’t need to like each other but I like the idea that somehow this musical idea surpasses anything that’s going on between us. It’s beyond personal shit, ego stuff.”
The closest Gahan has come to leaving the band was in the aftermath of his 2003 solo debut Paper Monsters. He’d enjoyed it to the point that he thought to himself, “How can I go back?” But he did, “because they’re my family. I love Martin. He’s given me everything I have. Martin could make records on his own forever, he could do that, but with Depeche Mode, he needs me. And I need him too.”
Dave Gahan says it’s all a bit of a game, life, and he’s enjoying it. “I’m a car thief from Basildon that got lucky. I’m fucking lucky, look at me!” He’s going to give Depeche Mode his all for the next eight months, until the end of the tour, and then he doesn’t know what’s going to happen. “I’m very aware of the fact it’s gonna end,” he says. “When we go onstage together, I feel like, ‘This is it, I’m done, I’m happy.’ But if [Gore] sends me a few songs in a few years that I’m like, ‘Wow’ [about], I’ll get pulled back in. There’s always a couple…”

Toronto, September 2017. Andy Fletcher is sat in the bar of the Four Seasons, a hotel of “unparalleled luxury” according to its website, the sort of opulent accommodation that members of Depeche Mode have got used to. During their ’80s rise, the band were hiring a bigger PA when the man at the rental company said to them, “See you on the way down.” “We never got to that stage,” smiles Fletcher. The 56-year-old is affable company, with a cool-dad vibe about him and an assured matter-of-factness to his conversations. “We’re one of the biggest groups in the world but we lead very normal lives,” he says, as if he’s telling you about a decent house insurance deal he’s just discovered. The synth player is the most musically limited of the trio but has acted as the band’s chief communicator, especially in his de facto role as manager until they got a proper one in the mid-’90s, a mere 15 years into their career. Traditionally, Fletcher and Gahan have never seen “eye-to-eye” but they’ve been getting on better recently. He and Gore, though, have been best friends since school – “he’s quite shy, I’m extroverted,” he says. “I suppose that’s why we make a good couple.”
The band are six dates into a sold-out North American tour and Fletcher is settling into his on-tour routine. He tries to go to the gym as much as possible and plays a lot of online chess. “There’s a lot of dead time on the road,” he says. “That’s why a lot of artists, including ourselves, get into drinking a lot cos there’s nothing to do.” Fletcher is the only member of the band who still drinks. He has a couple of lagers before he goes onstage, and a couple after. “I used to drink a lot before the show, we all did, onstage a lot, and after.” 
He says the partying during the Violator tour was under control, but it was during the 1993 tour to support Songs Of Faith And Devotion where “it all went into the abyss.” “Unfortunately for me, I’d suffered a nervous breakdown during the making of the album,” he says. “I had to do 185 shows on the back of a nervous breakdown. Martin was drinking for England and Dave was, as we know…” During one gig in New Orleans, Gahan had a drug-related heart murmur onstage and they couldn’t do the encore. Gahan was carried off to the hospital while the rest of the band partied on at the aftershow with strippers. Fletcher relays all this with the airy demeanour of a neighbour telling you about his new lawnmower, then comically adds, “but the excess was only for a relatively short period of our career.”
Later that evening, Fletcher sips from a bottle of water onstage at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. It used to be pints of wine but Depeche Mode gigs are a slick operation these days. It’s a spectacular two-hour show and Gahan is pumped-up from the start, with slicked-back hair and a pencil-thin John Waters-style moustache etched across his top lip. He wiggles his arse a lot and stomps around the stage like a Moulin Rouge Mick Jagger. He’s a master at ramping up the crowd. Gore is more of a steady presence, only veering from his stage-right position a few times to take lead vocals on Home, a stripped-back version of A Question Of Lust and the ballad Somebody, while Fletcher embarks on some excellent dance moves from behind his synth. They range from one where he looks like he’s directing traffic and another where he’s an amateur hypnotist. The show concludes with Gore and Gahan laughing manically at each other over the end of Personal Jesus. The stage is their safe place.

Next morning, Martin Gore strolls into a conference room on the third floor of the Four Seasons. There aren’t many things that could pierce the euphoria of playing in front of 20,000 fans, but looking down and seeing the words “conference room” on your itinerary must surely be one of them. Even so, the 56-year-old is bright and cheery, with a schoolboy smile (although they’re possibly not the same teeth he had as a schoolboy) and a Californian tan. He lives in Santa Barbara with his wife and young children. He has an easy manner about him, the sort you’d expect from someone who describes where they live as paradise. Gore says the band don’t see much of Gahan on tour. They all travel together and stay in the same hotel but Gahan, “for good reason, isolates himself a lot.” They travel to the venue at different times and see their frontman in the evening before they go onstage. He says that the singer’s energy during the show is probably pent-up from being in his room for 24 hours. The clear-the-air chat with Gahan during the recording of Spirit set a boundary, he says. “When Dave first started writing, I understood that he had a need to get out his creative side, I understood that. It wasn’t a big deal. But as the years have gone by, Dave is always pushing and pushing and pushing to get more tracks on the record, so it came to a head. James [Ford, producer] said that if the album starts having too many songs written by Dave, it becomes a Dave Gahan solo record and that there’s something unique about my songwriting and if it goes too far towards Dave, it’s not Depeche Mode. We needed to have that discussion because Dave, at the time, was suggesting a new song every day.”
Gore says that his best trait is that he’s non-confrontational. “I’m very placid, which comes in handy in Depeche Mode.” He says there are certain people who seem to love arguments, and Fletcher is one of them. “I think he likes taking contrary positions on virtually anything,” he laughs. Gore was an alcoholic who quit drinking during 2005/’06’s Touring The Angel tour (“I just dealt with it,” he shrugs). These days, the wildest he gets is sloping off for an afternoon nap. “I never thought in a million years I could actually have an afternoon nap. I’ll go back to my room, put on the Tibetan bells, start chanting and then 10 minutes later I’m fast asleep. I feel supercharged for the show!”
Gore has noticed that Depeche Mode’s crowd has been replenishing itself, with a new generation of fans at the gigs and teenagers joining older diehards in waiting outside their hotels. He still feels like an outsider. He says the fact that the band have never been part of the mainstream is an important part of their personality. “It’s why, especially in Europe, we’re seen as being more than just a music band. It’s almost like a cult phenomenon.”
He says Depeche Mode has to be seen as a finite thing, because every band is. “It just depends when that is,” he says, suddenly wondering aloud in a very Depeche Mode way, “will it be because of death? No one can predict the future. We’ve always said we don’t know what’s going to happen.” He can’t guarantee if there will be another Depeche Mode album. But he says he’s been saying that since 1986. Our time is up, and Gore has to get his things together to meet the rest of the band in the lobby. Their private jet awaits to take them to Montreal for tomorrow night’s show.

The Bell Centre is a 21,000-capacity arena in downtown Montreal. Usually home to the Montreal Canadiens ice hockey team, tonight it has been taken over by Depeche Mode and their 100-strong crew. Backstage, there are signs pointing off from the boulevard-style walkways for “Massage Room”, “Wardrobe” and “Catering”. Down another corridor and past “Dave Gahan’s Room”, you enter the “Lads Room”, where Andy Fletcher is sat on an armchair drinking from a big can of Fosters and Martin Gore is hollering from the top of some stairs. It’s close to showtime and excitement is building. The band are in their stage gear – a grey, sleeveless jumpsuit and a handful of eye glitter for Gore and a bomber jacket, black jeans and bright orange trainers for Fletcher. Out of the corner of our eye, we see Gahan being ushered into his dressing room. The singer is like a mythical figure backstage at his own shows: you are more likely to bump into Timmy Mallett than you are the band’s own frontman.
“Do you like my big can?” says Fletcher, holding up his impressively-sized beer. “It’s a pint and a half,” he says, thrusting one leg forward as part of his pre-gig stretch routine. Talk turns to how the band’s early shows in Essex shaped their approach to playing live. “It all comes down to Southend or Rayleigh,” says Fletcher, thrusting the other leg forward, “when we had a residency at Croc’s. We had an audience on a Saturday night where we had to get them to dance, get them to move, to react, so we learnt even in the early days how to get audiences going.” Martin Gore finishes making his Chinese herbal tea and strolls over. He talks about the petition online to get the band back to Croc’s [the club is now called The Pink Toothbrush], wincing over a documentary from the band’s early days that he watched recently. It’s almost time for them to go to the stage so Q grabs a drink out of their fridge (“you can have one of my big cans, if you like!” offers Fletcher), and heads back out.
A few minutes later, Iggy Pop’s I Wanna Be Your Dog blares out of Gahan’s room and the frontman’s guttural roar bounces down the hallway. Fletcher, doing some arm stretches, and Gore await their bandmate alongside touring musicians Christian Eigner and Peter Gordeno. “Fuck yeah!” shouts Gahan, riled-up behind his shades. The band enter into a huddle and the intro tape begins to roll.
It’s another brilliant and celebratory show. The crowd holler along to every word, turning understated tracks such as Wrong and Poison Heart into huge anthems, and the huge anthems into something that feels more joyous and emotional than a roll call of old hits. The end of Enjoy The Silence, in particular, is spine-tingling. Depeche Mode don’t know how to go through the motions. They savour the applause at the end, Gahan staying on last to milk every second, blowing kisses to the crowd. It’s times like this when the singer thinks that, yeah, they could go out on a high and finish the band. He’s happy, he’s good, he’s done. He’s been doing it for nearly 40 years and he knows it has to end at some point. But then maybe they’ll have a break, and maybe Martin Gore will send him some songs, and perhaps Gahan will listen, and he’ll think “wow,” and Depeche Mode will go again.

DEFINITIVE DEPECHE
The Basildon trio’s five greatest albums in their own words.
BLACK CELEBRATION (MUTE, 1986)
Martin Gore was coming into his own as a songwriter by the time of their fifth LP, combining pop hooks with a gloomy intensity. “Black Celebration wasn’t our biggest-selling album, but it was unique,” says Andy Fletcher. “The thing with [our] albums is that they take time, they’re not instant. Tracks like Stripped are now regarded as classics but at the time they weren’t received well.” Dave Gahan says that while making Black Celebration, they realised they weren’t a part of any scene in England. “We were doing our own thing,” says the singer. “Our radio plugger was like, ‘Where’s the song for the radio?’ But it was more important for us to be making a body of work.”
VIOLATOR (MUTE, 1990)
Emboldened by the success of 1987 album Music For The Masses, the band’s next record was their masterpiece. It was a stratospheric success, taking them to a level that only a few bands in a generation reach. “Violator is a Perfect 10 record,” says Fletcher. Gore attributes part of the album’s success to an incident in LA when the police shut down a record store signing and portions of the 17,000-strong crowd began to riot. “That riot made us national news,” he says. “I think that tipped us over the edge in America. All these people in rural areas, places we’d never been, were seeing us on the news and thinking, ‘Who is this band? Maybe I’ll check them out…’”   
SONGS OF FAITH AND DEVOTION (MUTE, 1993)
Enamoured with the prevailing grunge scene, Gahan encouraged the band to add dirgey guitars to the mix on their eighth LP. Despite the singer’s heroin problem, they listened to his advice and the thrilling Songs Of… is their most live-sounding album. The debauchery was starting to take its toll, though. “Bands make great albums on drugs, but you can’t make album after album on drugs,” says Fletcher. “You can make one, maybe a second, but you can’t keep on doing it cos it just combusts.” “We were young and we hit new heights; it went in at Number 1 in 17 countries or something,” says Gore. “I think we kind of went off the deep end a bit with that.”
PLAYING THE ANGEL (MUTE, 2005)
The trio sound reinvigorated on the first of a triptych of albums with producer Ben Hillier. Gahan had considered leaving the band in the wake of his 2003 solo LP Paper Monsters, but was encouraged to return when Gore sent him some tracks. “Mart was still drinking,” he says, “so that’s all he really cared about at that time, but he’d written some good songs and I was up for it.” The first Depeche LP to feature songs written by Gahan, the new dynamic gave them a fresh lease of life. “Depeche Mode is different; it’s Martin, and me, and Fletch too,” says Gahan, “and it’s who we bring into that, whether it’s Ben Hillier, or Flood, or Daniel Miller, or James Ford. That’s what makes it interesting to me.”
SPIRIT (MUTE, 2017)
A stand-off between Gore and Gahan stilted progress on Spirit until producer James Ford made them sit down and work out their issues. “We faced each other and had it out for the first time in 30-odd years,” says Gahan. “It cleared the air.” What emerged was their most vital album in years, Gahan’s songs of confusion and displacement dovetailing with Gore’s state-of-the-union anthems. “I felt the world was in a complete mess and I wanted to address that,” says Gore. It showed the band were still a modern creative force. “We think we’re ‘now’,” says Fletcher. “We don’t feel we’re elders. We’re capable of making great records and better records.”

DEPARTED MODE
The members who jumped ship along the way.
1. VINCE CLARKE, 1980-’81
Depeche Mode were, for all intents and purposes, Vince Clarke’s band. He was the original vocalist and main songwriter in Composition Of Sound, before he invited Dave Gahan to join and the quartet changed their name to Depeche Mode. “Vince was knocking on my door. He knew that I knew the right people to get us gigs and he knew that I could sing, so he got me in,” says Gahan. “Vince was the real driving force. He was writing songs every week and he was desperate to get out of Basildon,” says Andy Fletcher. Clarke, who was born Vince Martin but changed his name when a local paper did a piece on the band and he feared his dole officer would see it, wrote every song but two on the band’s 1981 debut LP, Speak & Spell, including early hits New Life and Just Can’t Get Enough. Clarke left the band soon after its release, wanting to take his music in a poppier direction and, as one rumour goes, because he wasn’t the biggest fan of Gahan’s vocals. He went on to form Yazoo, The Assembly and multi-million-selling pop duo Erasure. 
2. ALAN WILDER, 1982-1995
West Londoner Wilder was 22 when he answered Depeche Mode’s Melody Maker ad looking for Vince Clarke’s replacement. He joined as a touring keyboardist in January 1982, before becoming an official band member shortly after the release of second album, A Broken Frame, later in the year. His influence steadily grew over the next decade and he became an integral part of their sound, particularly in the studio – it was Wilder who transformed Gore’s plaintive demo Enjoy The Silence into a euphoric anthem with a house beat. “I love Al, he did some amazing work with us,” says Gahan. “Violator and Songs Of Faith And Devotion are records that he helped to arrange.” Wilder left in 1995 after the hedonism of the Devotional tour had plunged the band into crisis. “After that, I think he thought it was over. He looked at me, looked at everyone and thought, ‘He’s gonna die, he’s mental, I’m out.’ I don’t blame him.”
2017-06-30: Photobucket has disabled external image hosting, all scans will have to be re-uploaded on another site.

Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #721 on: 29 September 2017 - 21:24:36 »
2017-09-29 - Bolshoi (Belarus) - «Мы не пьем, словно сумасшедшие, как раньше, занимаемся спортом»

http://bolshoi.by/persona/andy-fletcher/

Музыкант Энди Флетчер: «Мы не пьем, словно сумасшедшие, как раньше, занимаемся спортом»
Екатерина Швед

Depeche Mode однозначно входит в число групп, которые не подстраиваются под правила игры, а сами их создают. Жаль, что этим летом Минск так и не дождался нескольких часов живого звука от легенд — из-за недомогания Дэйва Гаана концерт перенесли на 13 февраля 2018 года. В ожидании концерта приходится довольствоваться коротким интервью с одним из старожилов Depeche Mode Энди Флетчером.

— 68 концертов в рамках Global Spirit Tour 2017 за полгода, да еще на разных континентах — не слишком ли большая нагрузка для не самой молодой группы?
— Когда ты становишься старше, находиться в хороших физических кондициях все сложнее, но, знаете, мы сейчас занимаемся собой. Не пьем, словно сумасшедшие, как раньше, занимаемся спортом, следим за здоровьем. Что касается долголетия не физического, а творческого, даже не знаю, в чем наш секрет. Очевидно, в том, что мы написали много хороших песен — вот и гастролируем уже почти 37 лет. И просто невероятен тот факт, что сейчас мы более популярны, чем были раньше: фанов гораздо больше. Сложно понять, как мы этого добились.

— А кто на данный момент ваш слушатель?
— Аудитория очень разная, но в среднем — это парни и девушки (мужчины и женщины) в возрасте от 20 до 40 лет. Смешанная аудитория, но просто фантастическая!

— Лично вы приезжаете в Минск во второй раз. Заметили что-то интересное, кроме чистых улиц, на которые так любят обращать внимание иностранцы?
— К сожалению, почти не бывает времени, чтобы посмотреть города, в которых мы выступаем: у нас обычно очень жесткий график. Мы в основном видим аэропорты, отели, гримерки, оборудование и все такое… Мы видели Минск немного — очень приятный город, с удовольствием возвращаемся к вам с концертом.

— Часто говорят, что в Минске витает советская атмосфера…
— Призрак Советского Союза? Возможно, но мы не обратили на это внимания. Город красивый, интересный.

— А концерты в рамках одного тура чем-нибудь отличаются в зависимости от региона — выбором песен, сценических костюмов?
— Нет, абсолютно не отличаются. Мы привозим свой свет, звук, видеоряд, все. Так что в Минске вы увидите точно такое же шоу, как и, например, в Париже.

— Если вспомнить ваш первый визит в Москву в 1998 году, не страшно было ехать?
— Нет! Совсем нет, а чего было бояться?

— Это же была довольно закрытая территория — бывший СССР…
— Мы про это не думали, мы думали про то, что фанаты любят нас! Не думаю, что были в какой-то опасности, тем более что в 1995-м мы выступали в Восточной Европе: Венгрия, Чехословакия, Польша, Румыния. Так что мы примерно знали, чего ожидать.

— Отслеживаете ли то, что о вас пишут на фанатских сайтах в странах, которые вы посещаете в рамках вашего гастрольного тура? Бывали на сайте depechemode.by?
— Иногда мы бываем на таких страничках. Но знаете, большинство таких страничек — это нытье и причитание, иногда это просто чьи-то депрессивные рассуждения. Это отталкивает.

— Элтона Джона пару лет назад разыграли российские пранкеры, представившиеся президентом России Владимиром Путиным и его пресс-секретарем Дмитрием Песковым. Вы когда-нибудь становились жертвами подобных розыгрышей?
— Да, я слышал про этот розыгрыш; такие ситуации порой случаются со знаменитостями, но нас это пока обошло стороной. Могу вспомнить не смешную, а жуткую историю, однажды случившуюся с нами в Лос Анджелесе: на автограф-сессии в музыкальном магазине было около 25 тысяч человек, и когда мы пришли, началась давка: люди с улицы просто проломили окна внутрь. Были пострадавшие, нас в срочном порядке оттуда вывели. Это было что-то ужасное: люди, крики, полиция…

— У вас, наверное, хорошая охрана…
— Охрана есть, но мы не слишком усердствуем на этот счет. Людям не нравится, когда ты идешь, окруженный пятью телохранителями.

— Ваш коллега по Depeche Mode Дэйв Гаан назвал «Металлику» тяжелой группой, которая пишет поп-хиты. А как можно охарактеризовать ваш стиль?
— Могу сказать просто: наш стиль — это ретрофутуризм.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #722 on: 29 September 2017 - 21:48:05 »
2017-09-29 - Roland (Japan) - Roland KEYBOARD RIGS: ON STAGE WITH DEPECHE MODE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rk-Imacty7Q



Roland KEYBOARD RIGS: ON STAGE WITH DEPECHE MODE

Playing on the Global Spirit tour with Depeche Mode, Peter Gordeno needs a live synth rig that can take him from Personal Jesus to Enjoy The Silence. In this video walkthrough, he reveals the Roland gear behind his stadium-filling sound.

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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #723 on: 30 September 2017 - 01:37:06 »
2017-09-29 - Muzyka i Technologia (Poland) - Wywiady: Depeche Mode „Global Spirit Tour”

http://www.muzykaitechnologia.pl/wywiady/Depeche-Mode-%E2%80%9EGlobal-Spirit-Tour%E2%80%9D-_122461

Depeche Mode „Global Spirit Tour”
Łukasz Kornafel

Depeche Mode cieszy się niesłabnącą popularnością już od ponad trzydziestu pięciu lat i wciąż przybywają im nowe pokolenia słuchaczy. Od wielu lat zespół pracuje w trzyletnich cyklach: rok pracuje nad płytą, kolejny rok trwają nagrania, a w trzecim roku formacja przebywa w trasie.
Szczęśliwie dla fanów zespołu trwa właśnie trasa koncertowa „Global Spirit Tour” – zainaugurowana w maju tego roku, potrwa do marca 2018 roku. Dzięki Live Nation 21 lipca na Stadionie Narodowym w Warszawie w koncercie mogli uczestniczyć również polscy fani.
Przed koncertem spotkaliśmy się z realizatorami dźwięku zespołu – Anthonym Kingiem i Sarne Thorogoodem, by porozmawiać o przygotowaniach do trasy, zastosowanych rozwiązaniach technologicznych i realizacji koncertów.
Przez prawie cztery dekady działalności na scenie muzycznej Depeche Mode stał się jednym z najbardziej rozpoznawalnych zespołów na świecie. Takie utwory jak „Personal Jesus” czy „Enjoy the Silence” stały się częścią naszej kultury, często grane w radiu, chętnie wykorzystywane w filmach i programach telewizyjnych – i to zarówno w oryginale, jak i w postaci chętnie granych coverów.
Wykonywana przez Depechów muzyka nie daje się sklasyfikować w ramach tylko jednego gatunku muzycznego. Komponowane przez zespół utwory, zdaniem specjalistów, czerpią z takich gatunków jak new wave, dance rock, post punk czy alternative dance. Każdy kolejny album jest przygotowywane z bardzo dużą dbałością o szczegóły i to, w jaki sposób nie tylko napisany, ale również wyprodukowany jest każdy utwór, od lat budzi podziw fanów.
Te charakterystyczne brzmienia, które już po kilku dźwiękach sprawiają, że nie da się pomylić Depeche Mode z żadną inną formacją, są nie lada wyzwaniem w trakcie realizacji koncertów grupy. Pomimo tego, że w trakcie koncertów występuje tylko pięciu muzyków, ze sceny na konsolety trafia grubo ponad sto dwadzieścia śladów. Wynika to z faktu, że muzyka, mająca bardzo elektroniczny charakter, w znacznej mierze bazuje na instrumentach klawiszowych, samplerach, loopach i syntetycznych brzmieniach. Kolejnym egzaminem dla realizatorów, a przede wszystkim dla inżyniera stojącego za konsoletą FOH jest taki miks prezentowanych utworów, aby był on interpretacją odwołującą się do brzmienia zawartego na kolejnych albumach grupy, które znają i cenią jej fani. Na końcu realizator FOH musi dbać przede wszystkim o to, aby zapewnić odpowiednie pokrycie dźwiękiem całej nagłaśnianej przestrzeni, a w przypadku tej trasy są to przede wszystkim duże stadiony sportowe z kilkudziesięciotysięczną publicznością. Monitorowiec musi z kolei zapewnić muzykom odpowiedni odsłuch każdego dźwięku.
 
O wszystkich tych wyzwaniach rozmawiałem przed warszawskim koncertem grupy z realizatorem FOH Antonym Kingiem i realizatorem monitorów Sarne Thorogoodem.
 
Łukasz Kornafel, Muzyka i Technologia: Jak zaczęła się twoja przygoda z formacją Depeche Mode?
Antony King: Jak to zwykle bywa, zadzwonił do mnie znajomy z pytaniem, czy chciałbym rozpocząć współpracę z zespołem.
 
Czy współpraca z zespołem o tak ugruntowanej renomie była dla ciebie dużym wyzwaniem?
Tak. Mamy tutaj do czynienia z zespołem o ogromnej historii i dziedzictwie. To bardzo ważne, aby to uszanować i tego nie zmieniać. Wiesz, zespół odnosił sukcesy trzydzieści lat przed moim przyjściem – fajnie byłoby, gdyby odnosił je również po moim pojawieniu się [śmiech].
Zanim zacząłem realizować pierwsze koncerty, odrobiłem bardzo poważną pracę badawczą na temat tego, jak powinien brzmieć ten zespół, jak brzmiał na wcześniejszych albumach, nagraniach live itd.
 
Czy zaproponowałeś swoją wizję brzmienia?
Wspólną wersję. To nie powinna być moja wizja, ale pewien pomysł opracowany wspólnie z zespołem. Moim zadaniem jest przede wszystkim przełożenie tego, co robią, w możliwie najlepszy sposób dla słuchaczy zgormadzonych w hali czy na stadionie. Wiesz, koncert nie może brzmieć tak, jak ja bym sobie to wyobrażał, bo słuchacze zgromadzeni na stadionie mieliby poczucie, że to remiks ich ulubionych numerów [śmiech].
Staram się odtworzyć brzmienia, które znamy z płyt Depeche Mode. Rozmawiam z muzykami, pytam o pewne elementy. Definitywnie koncert ma być interpretacją płyty.
 
Co zdecydowało o wyborze systemu L-Acoustics na trasę Global Spirit Tour?
Gramy z wykorzystaniem systemu L-Acoustics po pierwsze dlatego, że Britannia Row, która jest dostawcą całego systemu audio na tę trasę, jest firmą posiadającą ten właśnie system. Poza tym jest to oczywiście świetny sprzęt, na którym pracowałem już wielokrotnie i który bardzo lubię. Uważam, że to świetny system właśnie na imprezy na stadionie, dzięki temu, że odznacza się świetnym zasięgiem. Nawet na odległości ponad 100 m dźwięk jest wciąż doskonały i niezwykle czysty.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #724 on: 02 October 2017 - 23:15:12 »
2017-10-02 - Depeche Mode on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/depechemode/posts/10156824450705329

Our thoughts are with all of the fans and artists, and their families
and loved ones, who have been affected by last night's horrific attack in Las Vegas. To see this atrocity unfold just a day after our own show in Las Vegas, an incredible, celebratory night of people coming together through music, is just unthinkable. Lots of love from the DM family -- you're in our hearts.
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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #725 on: 04 October 2017 - 23:29:33 »
2017-10-04 - Orange County Register (US) - Depeche Mode readies for its record-setting headlining run at the Hollywood Bowl

http://www.ocregister.com/2017/10/04/depeche-mode-readies-for-its-record-setting-headlining-run-at-the-hollywood-bowl/

Depeche Mode readies for its record-setting headlining run at the Hollywood Bowl
By KELLI SKYE FADROSKI

After wrapping up its lengthy Delta Machine Tour in support of its 13th studio album, “Delta Machine,” in 2014, English electronic band Depeche Mode decided to take a bit of a break.

The trio – including vocalist Dave Gahan, vocalist, guitarist and keys player Martin Gore and bassist and keys player Andrew “Fletch” Fletcher – didn’t stay dormant for long and reemerged in February with their brand new and politically timely single, “Where’s the Revolution.” The group also dropped its 14th studio album, “Spirit,” on March 17.

“You have to remember that Martin wrote these songs two years ago,” Fletcher said during a promotional press day in Los Angeles back in April before the Global Spirit Tour kicked off in Sweden on May 5. “That’s how his mind was thinking back then – things were bad with Brexit and then Trump is president – so Martin was already thinking back then that things were going to be bad.”

Of course the band, which has been an area favorite since the mid-’80s, even selling out the Rose Bowl in Pasadena with a crowd of 65,000 in 1988, wasn’t going to skimp on its shows in the Los Angeles area. At first, Depeche Mode announced two nights at the Hollywood Bowl, Thursday, Oct. 12 and Saturday, Oct. 14. As tickets began to sell out quickly, the band added Monday, Oct. 16 and a few days later, announced a venue record-setting fourth show on Wednesday, Oct. 18. Depeche Mode is the first band to play that many consecutive concerts at the iconic 18,000-capacity Los Angeles venue.

“We’ve always kind of held a special positioning here in Los Angeles,” Fletcher said. “Even from our early gigs in clubs to the Rose Bowl and it was a big deal for us when we played the Hollywood Bowl the very first time. It’s amazing now to be able to do that four times. It’s also fun to play these places with history. I mean, the Beatles played the Hollywood Bowl. That’s enough.”

Depeche Mode chose Los Angeles indie rock band Warpaint to open on the tour through North America and into Canada. Fletcher said he actually first met Warpaint anchor Stella Mozgawa a couple of years ago at his local pub in London.

“We sat down and actually had a meal with her and her friends,” he recalled. “They were just starting out then, they had maybe been around three years. We listened to their music and we just liked it.”

According to Fletcher, the Global Spirit Tour has sold more quickly around the globe than the band’s last two tours.

“We’re not like this high profile band and we haven’t done anything since the last tour and suddenly this tour is more popular than the last two,” he said. “It sort of makes you feel like we’re doing something right? It must be.”

Knowing that the diehard fans have purchased tickets to two, three or possibly all four of the shows at the Hollywood Bowl, Fletcher said that they’d make sure to change the set around a bit.

“We definitely have that in mind,” he said. “We will do something a little different each night, something special just for those fans.”

Back in August, hundreds of Depeche Mode fans got together at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena to watch a screening of the documentary “Depeche Mode 101,” which chronicled the final leg of the tour in support of its album “Music for the Masses” and the band’s sold-out performance at the Rose Bowl on June 18, 1988.

“That was a special time for Depeche Mode,” Fletcher said. “It was a special time for alternative music, it all kind of started around that period of time when all of these wonderful bands started coming out. When we announced it, there was a lot of skeptics that thought we wouldn’t sell many tickets. It was a risk all around and also for KROQ, since they were promoting it. It turned out to be a stand-alone moment that really kicked off some big music in America.”

For the new album, Depeche Mode stepped a bit outside of its comfort zone and tapped the talents of producer James Ford, who had previously worked with artists such as Arctic Monkeys, Peaches and Florence and the Machine. The process, Fletcher said, was incredibly fast for “a notoriously slow band in the studio.”

“We finished the album in three sessions of four or five weeks,” he said. “That’s one of the reasons we’re in quite the good mood at the moment because it gave us literally two months off when normally we’d be slaving away until the end. James is a multi-talented, multi-instrumentalist, a great producer who knows how to get a great sound. We were quite confident because obviously the bands he produced before – Arctic Monkeys and Florence and the Machine – those are good sounding records and in his second guise he’s in a synth pop duo, Simian Mobile Disco, so we knew he was one of us.”

Fletcher said that the band is grateful that the fans have latched on to the new material including the singles “Where’s the Revolution” and “Going Backwards,” despite their clear political tone.

“I was surprised because we did make a similar album, our third album, ‘Construction Time Again,’ which was similar in theme,” he said. “Martin didn’t really like the reaction, the journalists talking about how it was just about politics and things like that. Martin is a brilliant songwriter and Dave is a great songwriter as well. He’s always written songs that make people think. In fact, a lot of those songs are about politics, but he’s done it with a twist with like ‘Personal Jesus.’ He uses analogies like sex and Jesus to get those thoughts across.”

“You have to give Martin credit because we’re releasing this album now and it’s the right time. All of this will lead to loads of other groups trying to scramble to get something together, but as you know those won’t come out for a year or two, but the moment is here. It’s incredible how hip politics is at the moment and that has to be a good thing because most of the time people aren’t interested in politics. Maybe it won’t turn out as doomy as everyone thinks, but who knows?”
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #726 on: 05 October 2017 - 02:56:07 »
2017-10-04 - ABC (US) - Jimmy Kimmel Live

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0X3wECd1olI



Depeche Mode Performs "Cover Me"

https://www.facebook.com/depechemode/posts/10156845662675329
https://www.facebook.com/depechemode/posts/10156846272130329

“Cover Me” is my favorite track from Spirit. It’s a great showcase for Dave’s voice – subtle yet powerful. Last night I experienced just how subtle and powerful his voice could be when I was in the crowd for the band’s performance on "Jimmy Kimmel Live!”
For the taping of the show, the concert crowd stayed in the Green Room until the band was ready to perform. [...] Then there was that brief moment when Peter and Fletch left the dressing room and talked with a few fans while we waited. While I didn't get a chance to talk to them, they spent a good amount of time chatting.
If you’ve never experienced them in such an intimate setting, all I can say is WOW. Unlike large venues where he might need to turn his voice up to 11, Dave smoothly delivered the lyrics as Christian’s booming drums hit us like a hammer. You could practically hear the sound of Martin’s bottleneck sliding across the strings of his guitar and the clacking keys from Peter and Fletch. It was true to the album recording – and it was amazing.

Posted by: Dave Moreno
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #727 on: 10 October 2017 - 22:11:40 »
2017-10-06 - ABC 10 (US) - News

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYlozGTO4Mc



Tight security for Depeche Mode concert
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #728 on: 10 October 2017 - 22:37:19 »
2017-10-06 - Depeche Mode - Cover Me (Behind the Song)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9quy7MfHlk

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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #729 on: 10 October 2017 - 22:42:03 »
2017-10-06 - CBS 8 (US) - News

http://www.cbs8.com/story/36542380/san-diego-stepping-up-concert-security-after-vegas-massacre

San Diego: Stepping up concert security after Vegas massacre
There was an increase in security Friday night as thousands of Depeche Mode fans attended the band's concert in Chula Vista.
News 8's Eric Kahnert spoke to concert-goers and police about the event in this report.
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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #731 on: 11 October 2017 - 17:05:41 »
2017-10-10 - LA Weekly (US) - Depeche Mode Are About to Do Something No Other Band Has Done

http://www.icloudmobilemedia.com/i/886182-october-13-19-2017




http://www.laweekly.com/music/depeche-modes-dave-gahan-and-martin-gore-look-back-on-their-la-history-8736908

Depeche Mode Are About to Do Something No Other Band Has Done
BY LINA LECARO

Depeche Mode frontman Dave Gahan is having a wistful moment of gratitude, gazing out the picturesque window of his Beverly Hills hotel room at the sunshine that radiates like a golden blanket over steadily swaying palm trees and dreamy, magazine-ready homes in the hills beyond.
"L.A. has been there for us from day one, really," he says of his band's Angeleno fan base. "We were playing smaller places, but there was a cult aspect to the way people came to our shows and knew our music, before they even knew who the band was."
It's late April, and Gahan and his longtime partner in Depeche, Martin Gore, are doing interviews in their rooms at the Four Seasons as they gear up for a secret fan show at Hollywood Forever Cemetery's Masonic Lodge, a warm-up gig for an international tour in support of their latest album, Spirit. (The band's third member, Andy Fletcher, was not present.) Both speak enthusiastically about their love of L.A. and their fervent fan base here, which helped them sell out a record-breaking four nights at the Hollywood Bowl, something no other group has ever done.
Much has been made of L.A.'s Morrissey obsession, but it could be argued that Depeche Mode, who play those sold-out Bowl shows starting this week, enjoy an even more fanatical following here. There are club nights devoted to them and a popular DM convention held here every year, and the band's hits have never left rotation on L.A. radio, not just KROQ (where they got their first airplay) but mainstream pop stations as well.
Many Angelenos who came of age in the '80s and '90s feel a kinship with Depeche Mode and their songs' themes of sorrow and struggle, shameless romance and eternal outsider-dom. It's the same reason the goth scene is so popular here. Depeche Mode's music speaks to those of us who have always felt that the stereotypical image of sunny SoCal — wherein everyone is blond and beachy — is false and at odds with our true depth and dark proclivities. In an ironic way, dark music like Depeche's connects in L.A. more than anywhere else in the world. And you can dance to it.
Gore's ability to write emotive yet edgy songs with infectious hooks, and Gahan's visceral interpretations of them, have made them one of the most potent pairs in music. Personality-wise they could hardly be more different — Gahan the outgoing, dramatic frontman, Gore the quiet, sensitive songwriter. But they have much in common, too, including an obvious fondness for L.A. Gore lives with his wife and two baby daughters not far away in Santa Barbara. Gahan, who resides in New York, says his 18-year-old daughter, at the time of our interview, was considering attending USC. Still, their connection to L.A. runs even deeper than most people know.
Gore recalls the band being more of an underground phenomenon when they first came to L.A. during the "Just Can't Get Enough" era circa 1982, and how the crowds swelled when they returned around '85. "That was when it blew up," he says. "It seemed like alternative radio had taken hold of the country, but especially here in L.A. ... We went from playing small theaters to big ones, playing to 15,000 people. That was incredible for us at the time."
Gahan has a soft spot for early days, too, recalling the smaller shows when they were unknowns playing the Roxy and the now-shuttered Perkins Palace. He peers intently out his window once again, this time as if he's looking for something. "When I first came here, I was like, 'I wanna live here!'?" he says, pointing at the skyline.
He ended up doing just that after the band had become a household name with 1987's Music for the Masses, playing bigger venues and wrapping up that tour right here with a now-iconic show at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, captured by filmmaker D.A. Pennebaker in the documentary Depeche Mode: 101; the film last month had a 30th-anniversary screening at the stadium.
In 1989, Gahan left his first wife and moved in with the band's PR director, Teresa Conroy, whom he later married. His second wife is a big link to Gahan's L.A. story, one that many fans don't know much about. (Full disclosure: I have been friends with Conroy since 2008, after I profiled her in L.A. Weekly's 2008 People issue. Gahan brought her up during our interview unprompted.) What little they do know has, for the most part, been negative, with stories painting her as the scapegoat for Gahan's well-documented drug problems. With our conversation spotlighting L.A. and its influence on the band, the frontman seems eager to set the record straight.
"I fell in love with her during tour," he says. "We just connected and at the end, I told my wife in England I was not coming back. ... I showed up on Teresa's doorstep on Sweetzer and Fountain Avenue with my little suitcase and said, 'Hey!'
"We ended up getting married. We lived near Santa Monica, in Nichols Canyon and Benedict Canyon for a while. We moved around, but what brought that all down for me was I just wanted ..."
He pauses for a long moment. "Substances?" I ask.
"Yes. That's what I liked to do most," he admits, "and it tore us apart, so that was the end of it. I moved to New York around '97 and changed my life. My behavior was not gonna change in L.A.
"Some of what people thought about her might have been my doing, just blabbing my mouth off. I realized after being clean 10 years later, it was like, wow ... at the time, as long as I had what I needed, I didn't give a fuck about anybody else. And I didn't think I was that person, but I was that person."
Gahan, now 55 and married to his third wife for 18 years, has been clean and sober for more than two decades. He looks healthy and trim in a black T-shirt and dark-rimmed glasses, with hints of gray on his chin and temples. But back then, he nearly died a few times from heroin overdoses, once at the Sunset Marquis where the band rented a villa on a frequent basis. Today, however, he seems to associate L.A. and his second marriage not so much with his addiction but with inspiration.
"I haven't talked about it enough, but that time in L.A. was wonderful. The few years I did spend here when we were just hanging out and I didn't work for a couple of years, there were all these great bands playing, like Jane's Addiction, Guns N' Roses. Going to clubs like Cathouse. There was this great music coming out of L.A. There was an energy in some of the new music coming up that I was feeling and seeing here."
Gahan's personal style at the time was influenced by the L.A. rock scene (more tattoos, longer hair, leather), and he sought to steer Depeche's music that way, too. When he went back into the studio to make Songs of Faith and Devotion after 1990's Violator, the career-changing album that included worldwide hits "Personal Jesus," "Policy of Truth" and "Enjoy the Silence," Gahan says, "I was like, 'Guys, we've gotta change it up! This is just too clean, too neat!'?" But Gore and the rest of the band "didn't like at all where I was coming from."
Gore, the band's primary songwriter, was the more provocative dresser in Depeche's early days. He fancied lots of guyliner and became a fan of bondage getups — often purchased, he says, at Trashy Lingerie, not far from the Four Seasons. It gave the band an androgynous edge that "the girls seemed to like," and complemented Gore's sensitive lyrics and rhythm-driven compositions. Depeche were huge after Violator, so it's no surprise that Gore didn't want to change the winning formula, even if music in general was having a heavier moment.
Looking tan and content during our conversation (the bondage attire is long gone, replaced by a fitted black ensemble not unlike Gahan's), Gore, 56, concedes that letting go of creative control has always been something of a challenge. He describes how the early dynamics of the band evolved, putting him "behind the wheel" in terms of writing the songs and shaping the band's sound.
"When we first started we were 18 and 19, and the main driving force behind the band was Vince Clarke. He was the main songwriter, and we were just along for the ride, really," Gore says. "And then he announced to us that he was leaving before the first album was released. So because we were young and didn't really think too much about anything, we just booked some studio time and went in and carried on laying down with a three-piece, as you would at 19 and 20. We never expected it to be a huge commercial success, especially at the time. But then we grew up a little bit."
With Clarke moving on to other projects (notably Yazoo with Alison Moyet and Erasure with Andy Bell), Gore just naturally took the reins, and his talent for songwriting grew as he did. "By the time we got to the third album, we'd traveled the world quite a lot and seen a lot more," he says. "I started to get, not exactly dark by the third album [Construction Time Again], but a little bit more worldly, maybe."
Though Gahan felt like he "wanted to take it to another level," after his time in L.A. in the '90s, he didn't officially contribute to actual Depeche songwriting until 2005's Playing the Angel. It was all Gore until then. Still, the edgier aesthetics and more visceral performance style Gahan honed did steer the band into grittier territory, which fans (particularly female fans) found dramatic and sexy.
Both Gore and Gahan admit their relationship has had its tempestuous and trying moments over the years. But Gore says that after working on their latest, highly political album, Spirit, it's "as good as it's ever been."
For this tour and the Hollywood Bowl shows, Gore promises to take lead vocals on the tender numbers fans have come to expect from him, plus lots of groove-driven guitar work on songs both old and new. Depeche's massive catalog of memorable, emotionally charged music aside, their live show is why they continue to sell out stadiums at this point in their career.
I was lucky enough to attend both a rehearsal at SIR Studios in Hollywood before our interviews and the warm-up "secret" show at Hollywood Forever, and the band are as good as they've ever been onstage. With stellar production (including visuals by famed photographer and video director Anton Corbijn) and support from a solid backing band, Depeche Mode are almost certain to deliver the transcendent experience their fans expect. The Global Spirit Tour is aptly named, and Gore and Gahan hold nothing back, complementing each other in the kind of caustic yet comfortable way that only the most iconic duos do.
"Sometimes a band needs to have a bit of friction. ... The best stuff sometimes comes out of this need to be heard," Gahan explains. "Creatively we're old enough to realize that we respect each other's differences, and we know that we need each other. That's what Depeche Mode is. It's a weirdness between the two of us."
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #732 on: 12 October 2017 - 21:44:23 »
2017-10-12 - Atom Entertainment (Belarus) - Dave Gahan message for Belarus

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fULT8KGwVKQ



Dave Gahan message for Belarus

Hello there. This is Dave Gahan, and I am in San Diego. We're doing a show here tonight. And I wanted to say that we're really looking forward to coming back to Minsk next year. So I hope you can all come out and see us and give us a second chance. And it's gonna be a great show, so, please come on down.
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #733 on: 12 October 2017 - 22:19:03 »
2017-10-12 - KCRW (US) - Press Play

https://www.kcrw.com/news-culture/shows/press-play-with-madeleine-brand/depeche-modes-martin-gore-on-spirit-and-getting-more-political
https://www.depechemode-live.com/wiki/2017-10-12_Press_Play,_KCRW_89.9FM,_Los_Angeles,_CA,_USA

Depeche Mode's Martin Gore asks 'where's the revolution?'
It’s been 36 years since Depeche Mode put out their light and poppy debut “Speak & Spell.” After Martin Gore took over as primary songwriter, the band’s catchiest songs became political. Their songs have addressed corporate greed, inequality, and intolerance. Now the band is in the middle of a world tour for their new album “Spirit.”
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Offline Angelinda

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Re: 2017: Spirit and Global Spirit Tour
« Reply #734 on: 13 October 2017 - 21:57:27 »
2017-10-12 - Depeche Mode on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/depechemode/posts/10156873994220329

A note from DM:
Introducing the Spirit Truck. For the next week the truck will be out on the street, with some special stops around LA. Spot the Spirit Truck around LA, take a photo and upload it to Instagram with hashtag #SpiritTruckLA and #SpiritTruckLAGiveaway for a chance to win a signed, limited edition DM Hollywood Bowl poster. Follow Spirit Truck Los Angeles on Facebook, or @SpiritTruckLA on Instagram and Twitter for more information and updates!
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